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Full text of "The Maryland Magazine"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/marmag33univ 



Mumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



magazine 




Volume XXXIII Number Four • July-August 1961 



The Outlook for the West Today 



A Time of Celebration 



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The Cover: Students receive their diplomas ;it Commencemenl Exercises 

in the Cole Field House at College Park. A photograph showing Pre 
Commencement exercises at the School of Medicine is located on the in- 
side front cover. 



the 



IVEairylancL 



magazine 

Volume XXXII 



Number 4 



JULY AUGUST • 1961 



Alumni Publication of 

the University of Maryland 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

C. E. TUTTLE, Assistant Treasurer 
RICHARD W. CASE 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

SHELBY DAVIS WEINGARTEN, Assistant Editor 

JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
DR. REGINALD V. TRUITT, '14, President 
DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '11, Vice-President 
HARRY HASSLINGER, '33, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 

OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ADVERTISING DIRECTORS 
MRS. EDITH A. ROSS 
RICHARD F. ROSS 

6451 Blenheim Road 

Baltimore 12, Md. 

DR 7-7692 



In This Issue- 



FEATURES 

2 


The Alumni Diary 


3 


Alumni and Campus Notes 


5 


The Outlook for the West Today 


14 


A Time of Celebration 


18 


University Sports 


NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 




19 


Agriculture 


20 


Arts and Sciences 


21 


Business and Public Administration 


22 


Dentistry 


23 


Education 


24 


Engineering 


25 


Medicine 


27 


Pharmacy 


29 


University College 


30 


Completed Careers 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 
College Park, Md. as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879.— $3.00 per year— Fifty cents the copy— MemDer of American Alumni Council. 



The General Alumni Council 

school and college 

REPRESENT A Tl VES : 

l'«E 

H. M. Carroll, '20 
Paul M. Galbreath. "39 
Howard L. Stier. '32 

. - 
Charles F. Ellinger, '37 
John L. Lampe, '50 
Dr. Reginald V. Truitt, '14 

S I PUBLIC ADMINISTRA1 

Thomas E. Bourne, Jr., '43 
Ralph W. Frey, Jr., "41 
Chester W. Tawney, '31 

5 T R Y 

Dr. Samuel Bryant. '32 
Dr. Harry Levin, '26 
Dr. Edward D. Stone, '25 

E DUCATION 

Clara Dixon, '34 
Harry Hasslinger, '33 
Loren Lee Lindley, '48 

ENGINEERING 

Emmett Loane, '29 
Robert J. McLeod, '37 
John E. Waldo, '57 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '34 
Mrs. Ruth T. Clarke, '42 
Mrs. Jane M. West, '40 

I. x w 

Emory H. Niles, '17 
Layman J. Redden, '34 
G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Thurston R. Adams, '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 
Dr. William H. Triplett, Tl 

Mis. E. Elizabeth R. Hipp, '29 
Mrs. Norma S. Long, '49 
Mrs. Elizabeth R. Singleton, '47 

PHARMACY 

Hyman Davidov, '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen, '25 
Frank J. Slama, '24 



EXOFFICIO MEMBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Victor Holm, '57, Ass't Secretary 
Harry A. Boswell, Jr., '42, Past President 
Frank Block, '24, Past President 
Joseph H. Deckman, '31, Past President 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
J. Homer Remsberg, '18, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, TO, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19, Past President 

• 
ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES: 
Baltimore — Mrs. Ethel M. Troy, '17 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggett, '30 
Cecil County— Dr. Fred S. Fink, '56 
Cumberland — Reford Aldridge, '25 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley, '21 
Frederick County — 

James F. Zimmerman, '37 
"M" Club — George Knepley, '38 
Montgomery County — 

Robert W. Beall, '31 
New England — George Kerlejza, '25 
New York— Harold McGay, '50 
North Eastern Shore — 

Robert W. Downes, Jr., '46 
Overseas— Col. Ralph I. Williams, '33, '41 
Pittsburgh — Dr. Joseph Finegold, '34 
Prince Georges County — 

Egbert F. Tingley, '27 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Schenectady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, '19 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, '26 
Washington County — 

C. Scott Couchman, '51 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



MY CLOCK HAS STOPPED .... THIS MAY SOUND UNIMPORTANT UNLESS YOU 
too are able to hear the parade of history in the steady tick-tock of a 
grandfather's clock. On the face of the clock are the words Thomas Wagstaff, Lon- 
don. A faded note in my grandmothers handwriting states that the maker first 
produced seven clocks — then entered the ministry. In 1624 he was named Arch- 
bishop of London. 

I looked at the brass works under the rippled glass casing and at the carefully 
whittled wooden pegs. Each obviously has its function whether it be to set off the 
chimes, the hourly gong, or to control the various indications of the passage of 
minutes, hours, days and months. Where to start? 

I thought of my own grandfather and how he had stood before this same clock 
with the same inquisitive desire to see the clock run and hear it strike. As he lis- 
tened to the hesitating strokes of the pendulum and waited for the assuring tick- 
tock that meant the clock was accurately recording the passage of time once again, 
he must have thought, as did I, of the many passing generations whose hands had 
been a part of the craftsmanship of not only this instrument, but of his own life 
and that of so many others. 

Somehow, the big issues of the moment whether personal or international become 
enveloped in the dusty years of history that an old clock has seen parade. Busy 
young feet that develop with minds to make their contribution to life and once 
completed, to march on. Heartaches, frustrations, love, pride and great joy all 
have been expressed in the presence of this clock. 

Where have we been? Where are we going? You can almost hear the clock as 
it keeps pace with your heartbeat say, "I know, do you?" It is reassuring to 
know that a clock has survived all of the weakness and anxiety of man for nearly 
300 years. Is there a better reason for a feeling of certainty that each new genera- 
tion is going to lead the way to greater accomplishments, greater opportunity and 
greater revelation of the many remaining unlocked mysteries of life and environ- 
ment? This then makes us realize that those who have the opportunity to walk 
the educational pathway are the ones who will be the most blessed in their per- 
sonal fortunes, the most capable in discovering new horizons and the best pre- 
pared to serve mankind. This is why parents have such an intense desire to give 
their young folks the opportunities which a college offers. In the same vein, it is 
the reason those dedicated to providing instruction and facilities must be pre- 
pared to expand not only with population demands but with the realistic pressure 
which comes from ever-developing minds. 

The basic ingredients, as simple as they may seem, are still hard work, a sense 
of moral values and a goal of personal excellence. None of these can develop un- 
less there is opportunity to train the existing native intelligence. It is not enough 
to say we will take care of our children, let others look out for theirs. As alumni, 
we know what a college education has done for each of us. As the President of 
Ohio Wesleyan said. "What good will it do to have man-made islands in outer 
space or to send a man to the moon if we cannot finds ways of living together 
in peace on earth?" 

As ever, 




/ fiw^__^ 



David L. Brigham 

Alumni Secretary 



the Maryland Magazine 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



AUGUST 

7-12 4-H Club Week 

30 Golf Club. Scotch Foursome 
Tournament. 9 holes 

31 Football Press Dav 



SEPTEMBER 


1 


Football Practice Begins 


5-8 


Firemen's Short Course 


18-22 


Fall Semester Registration 


23 


Football, Southern Methodist, 




Away 


25 


Instruction Begins 


30 


Football. Clemson. Away 



OCTOBER 

7 Football, Syracuse. Home 

14 Football. North Carolina, Home 

30 Golf Club. All University of 

Maryland Club Tournament 




New Alumni Association Officers Elected 



New chief executive officers of the alumni Asso- 
ciation were elected by members of the Alumni 
Council on July 22 at the Sandy Spring estate of 
David L. Brigham. Executive Secretary of the Association. 

In the photograph on the left are, left to right: Dr. William 
H. Triplett. '11. Medicine, Vice President; Dr. Reginald V. 
Truitt. '14, Arts and Sciences, President; and Mr. Harry 



Hasslinger. '33. Education, Vice President. Mr. Brigham was 
reelected Executive Secretary. 

In the photograph to the right Dr. Truitt, standing, is shown 
addressing members of the Council. 

Brief biographical sketches of each of the new officers are 
presented in the first column o( the following page. 



July-August, J 961 



Dr. Reginald V. Truitt is a resident of 
Stevensville on the Eastern Shore's Kent 
Mand. Dr. Train's first association with 
the University came in 1910 when he 
became an undergraduate of the College 
Park campus. He received an A.B. de- 
gree in 1914. and an M.S. degree in 
1920. His Ph.D. degree was awarded 
In The American University in 1929. 
While working toward his advanced de- 
gree. Dr. Truitt taught at the University 
and attained the rank of full Professor 
in 1926. a position which he held until 
1943. From 1943-1954. he served as 
Director of the Maryland Department 
of Research and Education. An out- 
standing author and expert on the 
Chesapeake Bay and its products, and 
a noted authority on Maryland history, 
Dr. Truitt brings to the Alumni Associa- 
tion a wealth of experience and service. 

Dr. Triplett will be serving his fourth 
term as Vice President. He is Past Presi- 
dent of the Medical Alumni Association, 
Past President of the Alumni Club of 
Baltimore, and presently the Secretary- 
Treasurer; and he is Executive Director 
of the Medical Alumni Association, a 
position he has held since 1954. A vet- 
eran of both world wars, he attained 
the rank of Brigadier General and was 
Surgeon of the 29th Infantry Division 
in World War Two. Associated with the 
University of Maryland faculty since 
1924, Dr. Triplett has also had extensive 
activity in all Masonic Orders and in 
Veterans Organizations. 

Mr. Hasslinger, presently Assistant 
Field Director of the Department of 
Veterans Benefits, Veterans Administra- 
tion, has a long record of alumni activity 
and is an experienced educator. He was 
a member of the Warfield Commission 
which gave consideration to expanding 
educational opportunity in Maryland; 
taught at McDonough from 1936-1940; 
was in the service from 1940-1945, re- 
tiring with the rank of Colonel. He is 
presently Chairman of the Educational 
Committee of the Prince Georges Cham- 
ber of Commerce, a member of the Col- 
lege Park Board of Trade and is a for- 
mer City Councilman for College Park. 
He is Chairman of the local chapter of 
the National Christian Leadership and a 
member of the National Army Affairs 
Committee of the Reserve Officers As- 
sociation of the United States. 

Natural Resources Institute 
Established within University 

A modern research building for the 
study of aquatic biology as it occurs in 
the Chesapeake Bay area was formally 
dedicated recently at the Chesapeake 




Biological Laboratories at Solomons 
Island. 

The $120,000, two-story research 
building, which contains four labora- 
tories and eight offices, houses a salt 
water aquarium for biological studies of 
shell fish and fin fish. 

The same ceremony also marked for- 
mal transfer of the facilities and func- 
tions of the State Department of Re- 
search and Education to the new Natural 
Resources Institute of the University of 
Maryland. 

The Institute will be made up of the 
Crisfield Seafood Processing Labora- 
tories, formerly under the University's 
Department of Zoology, the Chinco- 
teague Bay Station, the Conservation, 
Education and Inland Resources Divi- 
sions at Annapolis and the Chesapeake 
Biological Laboratories. 

The Institute plans to open a new 
facility in Western Maryland July 1, 
probably in the Cumberland or Frost- 
burg areas. The Western Maryland facil- 
ity will be for studies of forestry, fresh 
water fish and wildlife. 

Dr. Orr E. Reynolds, Director of 
Science, Office of the Director of Re- 
search and Engineering, Department of 
Defense, presented the principal address. 
Dr. Reynolds predicted *'a brilliant 
future" for the Natural Resources In- 
stitute within the University. 

"Both institutions," he said, "will be 
enriched and enlivened — the University 
by the facilities of the Institute and even 
more by the spirit of the dedicated re- 
search laboratory which work has an 
important impact on the economy of the 
State, and the Institute by the stimula- 
tion that comes from close association 
with the diverse faculty of the University 
and especially with the eager imagina- 
tion and drive of its students." 

In his remarks of acceptance and in- 
auguration. President Elkins issued a 
cordial welcome to staff members. He 



Chesapeake Biological Laboratories 



said that the University hopes to bring 
its resources to bear on conservation 
problems, to enlist more students in the 
pursuit of biological studies and to re- 
tain and attract highly qualified per- 
sonnel. 

The University, President Elkins con- 
tinued, recognizes the importance of re- 
search and education in the conserva- 
tion of natural resources, particularly 
the assets of the rich Chesapeake Bay 
region. 

Alumnus is Book Publisher 

Jerome S. Hardy, B.P.A. "39, has been 
named publisher of the Time Inc. Book 
Division. He joined the staff of Time, 
Inc. in 1959 as a Director of Special 
Book Projects for Life. He was previ- 
ously associated with Doubleday & Co. 
for 13 years, serving as Trade Adver- 
tising Manager and Director of Adver- 
tising before his appointment as Vice 
President for Advertising in 1956. 

Mr. Hardy is a member of the 
Marketing Committee of the American 
Book Publishers Council and Past Pres- 
ident of the Publishers Adclub. He was 
a regular instructor at New York Uni- 
versity for four years and also served 
as visiting instructor at Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Hardy, a native of Manhattan, Kan- 
sas, is married to the former Betty St. 
Clair of Washington. D. C, and has 
five children. 

Dr. Fey Elected Chairman 

Dr. John T. Fey, '40, President of the 
University of Vermont, has been elected 
Chairman of the New England Board 
of Higher Education at its annual meet- 
ing, June 5. He succeeds President Eldon 
Johnson of the University of New 
Hampshire who had served for three 
terms. 



4 



the Maryland Magazine 



THE 

OUTLOOK 

FOR THE WEST TODAY 

3y Dr. Arnold J. Toynbee 

While I am talking, the outlook will be changing. 
Things may be happening at this moment in France 
or Algeria which might change the course of not 
only Western history, but the history of the human 
race. It's strange to reflect that, if we were still 
living before 1914 — or, for Americans, before the 
entry of the country into the First World War — 
we shouldn't have any question to be discussed. 
Because we shall have assumed that the outlook 
was to be taken for granted — that Western civiliza- 
tion was just civilization, and that it was going 
forward from strength to strength. Now it is 
obvious in our times that the West is passing 
through a great crisis in its history. 

J uly- August, 1961 5 



il the West has lost its previous supremacy in the World . . / 




IT IS NOT THE FIRST CRISIS IN lilt: HISTORY OF THE WEST. 
And passing through a crisis does not necessarily mean 
that we are approaching the crack of doom. It ohviously 
does mean in our case that we are in a situation in which 
we have to exert ourselves to the full — though we are not in a 
military war, or have to live and act as if we are living under 
war conditions. I think there is a double crisis, an internal 
change in the structure of the Western World and a bigger and 
more important change in its relations to the huge, non-Western 
majority of the human race. In the bigger field, the West 
has lost its previous supremacy in the World; and then, inside 
the West, Western Europe has lost its previous supremacy 
in the West as a whole. Let"s put it in a concrete way in 
terms of great powers — rather a hard-boiled way of looking 
at international affairs. In 1914 there were eight great powers 
in the World; and. out of these, six were in the West. They 
were Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Austria-Hungary, and 
of course the United States. Only two were non-western: 
Russia and Japan. Of those six Western great powers, all 
were Western European except the United States. And four 
of those five, all except Austria-Hungary, had colonial empires. 
So had three smaller West European powers: the Nether- 
lands, Belgium, and Portugal. So a very large part of the 
human race in Asia and Africa was under the power of one 
or the other of seven smallish powers in Western Europe. 
Now today all those Western colonial empires have almost 
completely evaporated. I myself think that is an excellent 
thing — something not to be regretted. But it is a big change 
in the political map of the World. There is no power today 
of the first rank in Western Europe. And there are only two 
left in the first rank in the World today. Only one of those 
is a Western country, this country. The other is the Soviet 
Union. It doesn't necessarily follow that there will remain 
always no more than two great powers in the first rank. If 
these two were to be joined by a third, it obviously will not 
be one of the former great powers in Western Europe. It 
will certainly be China. Then there will be two non-Western 
great powers and one Western, namely the United States. 

What I am saying, of course, is that the Western World 
has lost its military and political supremacy in the World. 



And. having said that. I'll say that I don't think lli.it that 
is ;it all the most serious thing that has happened in the West 
in our times. After all. the West's political, economic, and 
military supremacy is something ol a very recent date. It 
one tries to push its beginning as far back in history as one 
can, one can't push it much farther back than the last \ears 
of the Fifteenth Century, when West Europeans discovered 
the New World and discovered the continuous sea route- 
around the Cape of Good Hope to India. As a matter of 
fact that didn't establish the unchallenged supremacy of the 
Western World. Besides its sea frontier, the West had a land 
frontier, and obviously still has today a land frontier, against 
the great Asian continent. And. for the first centUT) or 
century and a half of the Western supremacy on the oceans. 
the West was still being threatened with being conquered 
from the landward side by some great empire based on 
Eastern Europe and Asia. It wasn't until the failure of the 
second Ottoman-Turkish siege of Vienna, in 1682-1683. that 
the Western World became secure from being overwhelmed 
by some superior power on the landward side. After that, 
the West Europeans could turn all their forces to the pursuit 
of the West's expansion overseas and through all the oceans 
of the World and over the face of the Globe. The period. 
between the year 1683 when the Turkish challenge was 
finally defeated, until 1917, when the Russian challenge first 
arose, is a rather short period in history compared with the 
length of the history of civilization, which runs to approxi- 
mately 5,000 years. And it is not surprising that this tempo- 
rary supremacy of the West should have been short-lived, 
because it was, after all, something quite abnormal. It is 
abnormal that any minority of the human race should be 
so dominant. Usually, in the earlier chapters of Western 
history, the West has been on an equality with the other 
civilized societies: with the Eastern Christian world, with the 
Muslim world, with the Hindu world, and with the world 
of Eastern Asia in China and Japan. So for both the West 
and the World, 1 would say that the liquidation that we are 
seeing taking place, under our eyes, of the West's temporary 
supremacy in the sense of material power is a return to 
normality and is not to be regretted. 



"I think the most serious thing that has happened in the 
history of the West since 1914 is our own offenses, . . . 
against our own moral standards." 



J uly- August, 1961 



I THINK THE MOST SERIOUS THING THAT HAS HAPPENED 
in the history of the West since 1914 is our own offenses, 
some very flagrant offenses, against our own moral stand- 
ards. Let me begin with the fact of two great wars, both world 
wars before they were over, but both originating in the 
Western World. They started almost as Civil Wars between 
communities in our Western civilization — two great wars in 
one lifetime fought with immense slaughter. I don't know 
whether the slaughter, the misery, and the destruction caused 
by those two Western-started wars in our times were greater, 
scale for scale, than, say, the corresponding destruction, suf- 
fering, and misery caused by the Civil War in this country. 
But I think there was a moral difference in the attitude 
towards war between the 1860's and '70's and the outbreak of 
World War One in 1914. In most parts of the Western 
World there was a change, at that time, in the attitude 
toward the ancient institution of war. We had come to think 
that war, like slavery, though it was a very old institution 
of the civilized world, was an intolerable one. And since 
we had already abolished slavery, so we ought to abolish war. 
Now I think that the two world wars were fought against 
the consciences of the greater part of the Western World in 
a sense in which previous wars, which had been, pro rata, 
as destructive and as wicked, were not against the consciences 
of our ancestors. 

War is an institution. It is an institution in the sense that 
it has a set of rules which are recognized by all of the belliger- 
ents. And one of the notable advances in Western civilization 
in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries was, first, that a 
network of treaties and international law had been built up, 
introducing some kind of order and decency into the jungle 
of international relations. In the second place, a distinction 
had been drawn between combatants and civilians. In the 
Wars of Religion, everybody was victimized, as everybody 
is today. Massacres of civilians were a normal part of war, 
then, as now again. In the Eighteenth Century, civilians were 
taken out of the combat. It was a kind of game, a very 
grim game — a game played with rules between uniformed 
armed forces. Civilians were supposed to be kept out of the 
horrors of war, and they were, more or less, in the Eighteenth 
and Nineteenth Centuries. Now, from 1914 onwards, these 
advances in civilization have been lost again. Consider the 
breaches of treaties and international law. The World got a 
great shock in 1914 when a supposedly civilized country, 
Germany, violated her treaty obligations to not only respect, 
but maintain, the integrity and independence of Belgium, 
and invaded Belgium on her way to attack France. Since 
the First World War we have gotten so much accustomed to 
breaches of treaties and of international law that we hardly 
notice them. Think of what Hitler's Germany did before and 
during the Second World War — her attacks, contrary to 
treaties and international law, on Austria, Czechoslovakia, 
Denmark, Norway, Belgium, and the Netherlands. Coming 
nearer home (it's always a good thing, if one mentions the 
misdemeanors of some other country, to mention those of 
one's own country), I would mention the attack on Egypt 
in the Fall of 1956 by Britain and France and Israel. If I 
had been speaking last week or the week before last, I could 
have stopped there; but history unfolds, and today I cannot 
stop without also mentioning the attack on Cuba. I would 
say that this is probably a breach of one of your Pan Amer- 
ican treaties — of one of the treaties of the Organization of 
American States — in which the parties bind themselves not 
to try to subvert the government of another American country 
by either direct or indirect means. So we are all of us impli- 
cated in these breaches of international law. 



"It is abnormal and wrong 



Then there have been atrocities on the civilian population: 
for instance, the shooting of civilians by the Germans as they 
marched from Belgium in 1914. When such things happen 
today, we hardly notice them. They hardly make a headline 
in the press. They made a sensation at the time because that 
sort of thing had been rare since the Wars of Religion in 
the Seventeenth Century. Today, unluckily, we are so much 
accustomed to them that they pass unnoticed. And of course, 
we must speak of the atrocities committed by the Nazi 
German regime in the Second World War, which far surpass 
those committed by the Germans in the First World War. 
Before the Second World War broke out, there had been 
the Nazi's atrocities on the civilian population — the genocide 
of the Jews and of other peoples of Europe. And at the present 
time, on our side of the Iron Curtain, there is tyranny and 
repression in many parts of the self-styled 'Free World.' I'm 
thinking particularly of countries where there is a minority 
of Western origin dominant over majorities of African or 
Asian population. Such cases as South Africa, Rhodesia, 
Kenya, and Algeria. 



Dr. Toynbee, distinguished scholar of history and 
author of the monumental, eleven-volume work, A Study 
of History, presented the address, "The Outlook for the 
West Today," at the University on April 25. The occa- 
sion was the annual lecture in philosophy sponsored by 
the Department of Philosophy. More than 1,000 stu- 
dents and faculty crowded the auditorium of the new 
Business and Public Administration and Classroom 
Building to hear Dr. Toynbee. 

Referring occasionally to a small sheaf of notes held 
in his right hand. Dr. Toynbee spoke for exactly one 
hour. At the conclusion of his address, he received a 
standing ovation. 

The article published here was produced by tran- 
scription from a tape recording. 



Dr. Toynbee won international acclaim with the 
publication of A Study of History. A two-volume 
abridgement of the work was widely circulated and read. 
Dr. Toynbee's writings also include several works on 
ancient Greek history: Greek Historical Thought, 1950; 
Greek Civilization and Character, 1950, and Hellenism, 
1959. He has also published two important books on 
religion: An Historian's Approach to Religion, which 
he delivered as the Gifford Lectures in 1952; and 
Christianity Among the Religions of the World, 1957. 
In three separate works he has addressed himself to 
the contemporary crises: Civilization on Trial, 1948; 
Prospects of Western Civilization. 1949; and The World 
and The West. 1953. 

Dr. Toynbee has been Professor of Ancient History 
at Oxford and at the University of London. During the 
crucial years 1939-46, he served as Director of the 
Research Department of the British Foreign Office. He 
has served, since 1925, as Director of Studies of the 
Royal Institute of International Affairs and is co-editor, 
with his wife, of the annual Survey of International 
Affairs. 



s 



the Maryland Magazine 



. that one country should rule another." 




. . . the Russians and the Chinese would never have taken 

i Communism by themselves . . . 

r ou couldn't possibly understand Marxism 

Kcept as something coming out of a Western background." 



July- August, 1961 



"There is one enormously leveling and unifying fore 
personally find formidable, and that is the force c 



Of course, I am not forgetting the similar repression by 
non-Western powers — by the Soviet Union in Eastern Europe 
and to some extent in Central Asia too, and by China of 
Tibet. But the West does claim to stand for freedom and 
righteousness and it claims to stand for these good things 
in contrast to the non-Western communist powers. Now, as 
we have made that claim for ourselves, we must judge our- 
selves — an d whether we do or not, we shall be judged by 
others, and these are the majority, because we are a 
minority under judgment — we must judge ourselves more 
severely than our opponents. And here we want to make 
a point that is painful for us. Our Western atrocities are 
abhorred by a majority of Westerners. Probably there is 
unanimity on this point in this room in condemning all these 
Western breaches of law, Western atrocities, Western aggres- 
sive wars. And yet we are all of us to some extent, even to 
an infinitesimal extent, implicated morally in the offenses 
committed by our fellow Westerners. We Western peoples 
have had a common civilization for at least a thousand years 
past. The spiritual basis of this common civilization is sup- 
posed to be Christianity. And these offenses which many 
Western nations have been guilty of since 1914 are all of 
them contrary to Christian moral principles. Now when we 
play or listen to German music, we don't think of it as 
German. We think of it as music, as Western music. And 
that is quite right. After all, it truly is the common music 
of the Western World. But, if German music is a common 
treasure of the Western World, then German atrocities are a 
common liability of the Western World. Similarly, if the 
countrymen of Shakespeare commit misdemeanors, that im- 
plicates other Western peoples, besides the English. And 
here we come to quite a difficult question: the degrees of 
responsibility for misdemeanors committed by members of 
our community, our society, or our country. Think in terms 
of Germany under the Nazi regime. Now some of the Ger- 
mans resisted the Nazi regime and its crimes, and gave their 
lives for it. They were martyrs. These German martyrs 
couldn't be held in any way morally responsible for what the 
Nazi Germans did. For one cannot do more than give one's 
life in resisting evil. There were other Germans who perhaps 
disapproved just as thoroughly as the Germans who spoke 
out and lost their lives, but who said nothing, did nothing, 
and got by. They haye a greater responsibility. There are 
others who didn't exactly approve, but who willing to take 
part, and who, if Germany had won the war, would have 
profited by Germany's conquering a large part of the World. 
Their guilt is obviously greater. Finally you come to the 
Germans who actually committed those atrocities. They are 
guilty one hundred percent. There are concentric circles of 
responsibility. My real point is, that, even if we are on the 
outermost fringe of the outer circle, we all have some measure 
of responsibility for the ^misdeeds of our common Western 
World. 



NOW I HAVE STARTED PERHAPS ON THE GLOOMY SIDE 
of the moral debit sheet of the West today. Let's 
consider what is on the credit side. While there has 
been a powerful outbreak of evil in our Western World 
since 1914, there has also been an intense struggle in the 
West between incompatible forces of good and evil, and, 
up-to-date, what we in this room would call the good forces — 
meaning the liberal forces, I suppose — have just kept the 
upper hand. I say 'just,' because we don't yet know the 
outcome of the crisis in France. It is a rather sobering thought 
that we haven't by any means done with Fascism yet in the 
Western World. And it is just within the range of possibility 
that it might recapture a part of the Western World. If the 
professional paratroopers and the Foreign Legion were to 
capture and conquer metropolitan France, this would put 
one of the key countries of the Western World in Fascist 
hands. Fascist France, combined with Fascist Spain, would 
be a pretty big hole in the solidity of Western democracy. 
At the same time, in spite of Fascism, I think one can say 
that social injustice has been greatly diminished in the 
greater part of the Western World since 1914. Not in the 
whole of the Western World. If you have traveled in Sicily 
or South Italy or Spain recently, you will not think so. But 
these are outlying and exceptional parts of the present-day 
Western World. 

In the lifetime of someone my age, and I am 72 years 
old, there has been a most remarkable and unexpectedly 
rapid and thorough admission of the formerly underprivileged 
majority of the population of Western countries to a greater 
share in the amenities of civilization. I've seen an extraordi- 
nary peaceful revolution in my own country in my own time. 
Let me illustrate by my own experience when I was a 
student at Oxford in 1907-11. If you were not a scholar 
(and there were few scholarships then) you couldn't go to 
the Universities of Oxford or Cambridge unless your parents 
could pay the very high fees. The privilege was there. This 
opportunity was limited to a tiny privileged section of the 
population. Today I think it is true that three-fifths of the 
students at Oxford and Cambridge are at the University on 
scholarships provided by the local education authorities. This 
has been a tremendous peaceful revolution. Today all the 
ability of the country is able to go to these universities, and 
from these into the most important professions in the country. 
And this is not true of Britain only. It is true of the great 
majority of the countries in the Western World. 

And then consider those former colonial empires of West 
European countries which covered so large a part of the 
inhabited world right down to the Second World War. Since 
the Second World War there has been liberation on a wide- 
spread scale, some part of it only partly voluntarily, some of 
it wholly voluntarily. And here, to balance points that I 
have mentioned to the discredit for my country, Britain does 
deserve credit for this. In 1947 we gave independence to 



10 



the Maryland Magazine 



hick I 
chnology." 




India, Pakistan, Burma, and Ceylon, which between them 
make up, I guess, a sixth of the total population ol the 
World, and a much greater portion of that part of the human 
race that until then had been under colonial rule. I hat was 
so large a part that it meant that inevitably all the other 
territories under colonial rule would very rapidly gain their 
independence, as we have seen happen since 1947. 

And now I come, incidentally, to an extremely important 
point. It is abnormal and wrong, I should say, that one 
country should rule another. It is important that if a country 
has foreign subjects under its rule, it should liberate them. 
It is equally important that, if it decides to liberate them, it 
should help them in advance to gain the experience and 
ability to run their own affairs: not just their political affairs, 
but all of the skills needed to run a country efficiently if it 
is to take its place in the World today. The Parliament in 
Britain decided in 1917 that it was going to give India self- 
government by installments. England had conquered India 
by force without asking the Indians' leave, and by that time 
there was already a very strong Indian national movement. 
Yet the Indian people volunteered by hundreds of thousands 
to fight in the British army against the Germans in the First 
World War, because, in spite of their struggle to get free 
from Britain, they thought that, on the whole, the First World 
War Britain was fighting on the side of freedom and Germany 
was not. This touched the hearts of people in Britain. It also 
touched their consciences, and that made them decide that, 
by installments, they would give independence to India. Now 
thirty years, 1917-47, seems a long time to people who are 
eager for independence. And thirty years is a very long slice 
out of a single lifetime. But a single lifetime is very brief 
when compared to the length of history. And thirty years 
is no more than the minimum time in which a country can, 
by stages, take over the running of itself from a foreign gov- 
ernment. I think you will find that the striking difference 
between some recently liberated countries, which are able 
more or less to handle their own affairs, and others which 
are obviously very much less able, all goes back to how 
far the former colonial power tried to help the people to 
prepare themselves for independence. I think we've nearly 
liquidated the colonial regime, but there remain some coun- 
tries with a mixture of races: Algeria, South Africa, the 
Rhodesias. You know all about that in this country. You 
have your problem of integration in sections of this country 
where there are two races and where the African race is 
in considerable numbers. In countries where the people of 
a European race are in the minority, they are more frightened 
than they seem to be in this country. So there the problem 
is still more difficult. In the present World, I think equality 
is sure to prevail, though not necessarily parliamentary-demo- 
cratic equality. It might be dictatorial equality or some other 
kind of equality. But, in one form or another, the majority 
of the human race is going to insist, and insist successfully. 



11 



on having equality, in spite of the resistance that the colons 
and the French Army in Algeria and the white minority, espe- 
cially the whites of Dutch language, in South Africa and the 
smaller white minority in Rhodesia are making to equality 
with the people under their rule. I think those movements 
to maintain a white minority's supremacy are doomed to 
failure. Of course, they may do enormous damage to the 
Western World as a whole before they do fail. And that is 
why this great unsolved issue must be faced in France today. 
We come now to a rather encouraging point. When the 
peoples under colonial rule were struggling to liberate them- 
selves from colonial rule, there was a great debate, of course, 
in all countries with colonial empires as to whether we should 
meet their wishes, cooperate with them, help them to get 
on their feet, or whether we should resist. Some of the 
diehards wanted to retain colonial rule into perpetuity. And 
some of them argued (perhaps sincerely, though obviously 
not disinterestedly) that it was our moral duty to retain our 
rule because, if we let it go, the pre-colonial regimes would 
come back and these regimes were notorious for having been 
extremely oppressive towards the majority of the population, 
particularly in Asian countries. But the striking point is 
that most of these Asian countries have now been given 
their independence and the former rulers have not come 
back. The people who have come into power have been the 
leaders of the resistance movements against colonialism, and 
these leaders, of course, have been just the people in these 
countries who had been most Westernized. If you are resist- 
ing Western rule in the name of liberty, you do so because 
you have imbibed the Western notion of liberty as put into 
practice in the democratic countries of the Western World. 
Now a foreign government always has to be rather tender- 
handed in dealing with its subjects, because foreign rule is 
always rather explosive. Foreign rulers are sitting on a vol- 
cano. But a national government can be much more drastic 
in making necessary reforms. So we see in all liberated coun- 
tries a movement towards social justice. When I visit one of 
the newly founded countries and go to the capital and am 
being shown around by one of the nationals of that country, 
he will point with pride to the new buildings going up. Then 
I look for the biggest building and say, "That's the income 
tax building, isn't it?" He answers invariably, "Yes, but how 
did you know?" Well, independence and modern life have 
to be paid for in the literal sense, and the income tax is, I 
think, a good form of payment for greater social justice. 
This is happening in all ex-colonial countries. None of them 
have been going back to their pre-Western way of life. 



I WILL MAKE ANOTHER POINT WHICH MAY BE DISAGREE- 
able. We think of the Western way of life as being what 
one might call the liberal-democratic-parliamentary form. 
But Communism is also a Western way of life, though it is 
one which the West itself has rejected. That a way of life 
should be rejected in its birthplace is a commonplace — 
Buddhism arose in India; it was rejected in India and came 
to stay in Eastern Asia. Christianity arose in the Levant; it 
was rejected in its homeland and it came to stay in Western 
Europe and the Americas. Similarly, Communism has been 
rejected in its West European place of origin and has made 
its fortune so far in Russia and China and a few other places 
outside the West. But Marx and Engels were born in the 
Rhineland and did their life-work in my country. Marx 
worked out most of his philosophy in the reading room of 
the British Museum in London, and Engels supported Marx 
and his family by running a small factory in Manchester, 




England. And as you probably know, Marx's bones are buried, 
not in some grand mausoleum in the Kremlin, but in an 
obscure churchyard in London. Between the wars, the Treas- 
ury of the United Kingdom was negotiating with the Russian 
government for purchasing the Codex Sinaiticus, which 
was in Russian possession, and the Russians were naturally 
asking a handsome price for the manuscript. Somebody wrote 
to The London Times saying: Why don't we propose to 
exchange the Codex Sinaiticus for Marx's bones? The Com- 
munists are obviously bound to say that Marx's bones are 
more valuable than a manuscript of the Bible. However, we 
paid money for the Codex Sinaiticus and we kept Marx's 
bones. My serious point is that the Russians and the Chinese 
would never have taken to Communism by themselves if 
they hadn't found it in the West, ready-made and waiting to 
be exploited. You couldn't possibly understand Marxism 
except as something coming out of a Western background. 
It couldn't have been derived from Russia's past or from 
China's past. It is unmistakably Western in character. Now 
at present our liberal form of Westernism and the Communist 
form of Westernism are the only ideologies that are in serious 
competition for the allegiance of the human race. And, 
whichever of the two a non-Western country chooses, it is 
choosing a Western way of life. Suppose that I myself, by 
the accident of birth, had been born in China instead of 
England. I should have been educated until the revolution 
of 1911 in The Confucian classics, and this education would 
have stamped me for life, as I have been stamped by the 
classical education that I have had in Latin and Greek. Then, 
from my traditional Confucian point of view, the arrival of 
liberal democracy under the Kuomintang regime would be 
just one wave of a foreign Western ideological invasion. 
And the Communist wave would have been just a second 
wave of Westernism. From the Confucian point of view, 
what would have struck me would have been the similarity 
between the democratic and the Communist form of the 
Western outlook rather than the difference between them. 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



I SUPPOSE THAT, IF WE MANAGE TO AVOID FIGHTING A 
third World War and therefore allow the human race 
to continue to exist, Liberalism and Communism will be 
likely, bit by bit, to come closer to each other. There is one 
enormously leveling and unifying force which 1 personally 
find formidable, and that is the force of technology. It is 
working all over the World and is forcing all human beings 
into a common mold, making over their social institutions 
and, more than that, their culture, their thoughts, their values. 
It is a thing that is going to diminish the differences between 
the two sides of the Iron Curtain. Then there is a common 
goal which, whether we like it or not and whether the Com- 
munists like it or not, we shall both of us be forced to pursue. 
Fortunately it is a good goal. I think it is the most important 
thing in the World today — far more important than the 
ideological quarrel between the Communists and the Liberals. 
I mean the raising of the standards of the two-thirds or 
three-quarters of the human race that are neither Communists 
or Liberals. These people are not interested in the quarrel 
between us; they are— humanly and naturally — more inter- 
ested in the raising of the standards of living of the peoples 
of the World. It needs raising, not because a material standard 
of living is an end in itself, but because, if your standard is 
just on the border of the starvation-line, the raising of it a 
few inches above the starvation line is an essential condition 
for raising one's spiritual standard. I am thinking of things 
like putting a concrete lip around the village well so that the 
water is not contaminated any more; building a dirt road to 
connect the village with the nearest main road so they may 
have some intercourse with the outer world; finally, building 
the village school. When you get to building a school and 
assigning a piece of land for the school master, you are rais- 
ing the material standard and the spiritual standard too. Now 
those are the things that are the great concern of the human 
race today. And, in so far as we or the Communists help or 
hinder the majority of the human race in its effort to attain 
these obviously good and right goals, we shall be accepted 
or rejected by the human race as a whole. We don't yet know 
what the answer to that question will be. 



CAN i hi v. i si EVER GE1 BACK rO ITS FORMES pom I ion 
oi equality with the resl oi the WorId7 ["hat is the 
real anxiety at the back ol .ill ol our minds .it this 
time. To take an analogs from flying il s pretty hard to get up 
into the air, but the crucial thing aboul flying is getting down 
to the ground again. It was quite a feat foi the Western 
World in the early modern age to win its ascendency over 
the rest of the World. It is going to be a much greatei task 

for us to get down to equality again without some kind ol 
catastrophe. Hut it is. I should say, the common interest Ol 
the Western minority and the oon-Western majority oi the 
human race that we should get back to equality without a 
smash. The West's ascendency Iras started the unification ol 
the World. The World has been united so far as a common 
arena for warfare, for intercontinental missiles. Having been 
unified to that degree, we have either to destroy ourselves 
or else unify ourselves in a more spiritual sense by creating 
one World in which the whole human race can live together 
like a single family. The first stage in the unification of the 
World has been brought about by our Western ascendency 
on the material plane. Western economic and political power 
has established material means of communication. Lor the 
first time, the whole inhabited World has become one society 
for one purpose — the military purpose— but unhappily not 
for all purposes. I think that, as time goes by, this common 
civilization that we now possess in embryo will receive con- 
tributions from all the traditional civilizations of the different 
regions of the planet. But, to begin with, since the unity has 
been brought about initially by the West, certain elements 
of the Western civilization — for instance, Western technology 
and, I hope, to some extent the ideas and institutions of the 
democratic (and not the Fascist part) of our Western World 
will form the framework for one World. Therefore, until that 
framework has built up inside itself a united World, I think 
the Western civilization is still necessary for the rest of the 
World. So I think that we can sincerely hope, for the good 
of the majority as well as for the good of ourselves, who are 
a minority, that we may get back to equality without a disaster. 



' Then there is the common goal which, whether we like it 
or not and whether the Communists like it or not, we shall 
both of us be forced to pursue. Fortunately it is a good 
goal. I think it is the most important thing in the World 
today, far more important than the ideological quarrel 
between the Communists and the Liberals. I mean the 
raising of the standards of the two-thirds or three-quarters 
of the human race who are neither Communists or Liberals." 



July- August, 1961 



13 





left: Processional of 
Commencement at 
College Park, above: 
Platform party leaves 
hall at Heidelberg^ 
above center: A' 
nurse at Medical 
School Exercises j 
above right: Dem~, 
onstration of closed 
circuit television pre- 
sented by Dental 
Alumni. lower 
left: Nursing Alum- 
ni banquet, lower 
right: Pharmac) 
Alumni meeting. 



The University Commenci 



FOR A BRIEF MOMENT IN JUNE, AMERICANS PUT ASIDE 
their cares to celebrate the achievement of the nation's 
new generation of young adults. In commencement 
exercises throughout the land more than 490,000 men 
and women received bachelors and higher degrees. At the 
University of Maryland, the second largest graduating class, 
2,822 students, were graduated from 13 schools and colleges. 
The exercises were witnessed by more than 9,000 parents, 
friends and faculty. 

Principal Commencement speaker was the Honorable Luther 
H. Hodges, Secretary of Commerce. 

Speaking on the need for education in today's world, Mr. 
Hodges said: 

"Higher education enrollments have been increasing steadily, 
and over the next ten years they will jump spectacularly as the 
postwar baby crop reaches college age. Last fall, we had 3.6 
million young men and women enrolled in degree-credit 
courses at colleges and universities. By the fall of 1970, the 
figure will be more than 6 million, or a near-doubling of stu- 
dent bodies in a single decade. 

"Here at College Park, I understand, you are forecasting a 
49 percent increase in enrollment by 1964-65. And this will 
come on top of a rise from 7,540 to 10,168 in full-time equiva- 
lent enrollment over the past five years. 

"... I know that most universities are keenly aware of 
their responsibility to educate increasing numbers of students 
at increasingly high standards. This nation has already built 
a system af higher education that has no equal in the world. 
The plans that are now under way — for expanding facilities, 
improving curriculum, raising faculty standards — should be 
reassurance that most colleges have every intention of main- 



taining their superiority. This means, for one thing, that our 
public schools, elementary and high schools must do a far 
better job of preparation than they are now doing. 

"On the whole, we have come a long way these past few 
years to waking up to our real needs for education. The accom- 
plishments of the Soviet Union have been a rude stimulus, 
shaking us to the truth that the U. S. supremacy in science, 
which we took for granted, might actually prove to be tech- 
nological inferiority. And again I raise a warning to all the 
public to take heed. 

"[ think we are about ready to make sacrifices, to admit our 
life has been too smug and comfortable, and to recognize, as 
Edward Payson said, that 'luxury is the first, second, and 
third cause of the ruin of all republics. It is the vampire which 
soothes us into a fatal slumber while it sucks the life-blood 
of our veins.' 

"In short, I think we are — we must be — ready to pay the 
price for excellence in education and for assuring, as the Presi- 
said, 'that every talentted young person who has the ability to 
pursue a program of higher education will be able to do so if 
he chooses, regardless of his financial means.' 

"Now just one last word. For you in this graduating class 
there will be most exciting opportunities in this expanding and 
changing world. There will be new things to be done in every 
field of endeavor, and there will be challenges. To these chal- 
lenges, you will bring a freshness and vitality, and if you have 
spent your years here well, if you have developed character 
as well as your brain, you will make the most of your oppor- 
tunities. Your horizons are limited by neither time nor space. 
You can make what you will of your talents and your energies 
in a world which is wide enough and high enough to encom- 
pass your broadest visions and highest ambitions." 



14 



the Maryland Magazine 



■ ■■ '? EWMH 




ient: A Time of Celebration 



OLLOWING THE ADDRESS, DR. WILSON H. EI.KINS, PRESI- 

dent of the University, conferred an honorary Doctor of Laws 
degree upon Secretary Hodges and Dr. Antonio Fernos-Isern, 
Resident Commisioner of Puerto Rico in the Congress of the 
United States and a member of the University's Class of 1915, 
School of Medicine. 

Glenn Theodore Seaborg, Nobel Prize Winner in Chemistry, 
was cited for his contributions to science which has "added 
significantly to American scientific prestige in the eyes of the 
world," and was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science 
degree. 

Honorary certificates of merit in agriculture were awarded 
to four Maryland citizens for their contributions to agriculture 
in the State. They were Mrs. John D. Young of Westminster; 
Randall G. Spoerlein of New Windsor; Edgar G. Emrich, of 
Emmitsburg; and Frank D. Brown, Jr., of Port Deposit. 

Following the presentation of honoray degrees and certi- 
ficates, a procession of 2,822 students crossed the platform 
and received their degrees. 

On hand to welcome the Class of '61 into alumni ranks 
were representatives of the Alumni Association. 

Pre-commencement celebrations on the Baltimore campus 
usually revolve around "June Week" activities which include 
banquets, award assemblies, dances, and alumni reunions. 

Faculty members of the School of Nursing honored mem- 
bers of the graduating class at a precommencement tea on 
Saturday, June 3 in Whitehurst Hall. Parents of graduates 
attended. 

The traditional cap-stringing event was held this year at a 
dinner meeting on June 6. The School's fluted cap, designed 
by Florence M. Nightingale, must be strung to fit each indi- 
vidual wearer. 



Mrs. Elizabeth Hipp, President of the Nurses' Alumnae 
Association, presented a life membership in the Association 
to Blanche Martin Horine, a member of the class of 1921 and 
wife of Dr. Cyrus F. Horine, in recognition of her loyal serv- 
ice as treasurer of the Association. 

Certificates of recognition were also awarded to other 
alumnae of 50 years' standing or more. 

Alumni Day was celebrated at the School of Medicine on 
June 8. 

The scientific session, which was held in Davidage Hall, 
was conducted by Drs. Morris J. Nicholson and David M. 
Spain. 

Recipient of the 1961 Alumni Honor Award and gold key 
was Dr. Walter D. Wise, a graduate of the class of 1906. Dr. 
Wise has practiced general surgery in Baltimore since 1913 
and before his retirement in 1956 was Professor of Surgery 
at the University's School of Medicine, Chief of Surgery at 
Mercy Hospital, and Lecturer at the Johns Hopkins School 
of Medicine. 

The afternoon was devoted to class reunions, which were 
planned for the class of 1911 and every fifth year thereafter. 
The annual banquet was held in the Lord Baltimore Hotel. 

Besides Dr. Wise, guests of honor included Mrs. John L 
Whitehurst, member of the University's Board of Regents; 
President Elkins; Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, Executive Vice Presi- 
dent of the University; Dr. William S. Stone, Dean of the 
School of Medicine; The Reverend Francis J. Linn, rector 
of St. Edward's Parish; Mr. David L. Brigham. Director of 
Alumni Relations; and members of the graduating class of the 
School of Medicine. 

Dr. Walsh McDermott, Chairman of the Department of 
Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Cornell University 



July-August, 1961 



15 




WHERE 
CANNON 



ONCE 
STOOD 



Remember the pair of can- 
non atop the hill? They were 
removed, and a tall, inspir- 
ing chapel now stands there. 
The relics of war surren- 
dered to the symbol of 
peace. 



Yet, without such cannon, 
would members of all faiths 
share this chapel today? We 
doubt it. That's why the 
Martin Company makes mis- 
siles. 




Medical College, was the principal 
speaker at precommencement exercises 
held by the School of Medicine June 
9, in the courtyard of University Hos- 
pital. Dr Lee Hornbake, Vice President 
for Academic Affairs, extended greetings 
to the graduating class. The nurses' 
choral group, under the direction of Mr. 
Charles Haslup, sang several selections. 

The School of Pharmacy held its 
eighth annual honors convocation on 
June 8, in the auditorium of the new 
Health Sciences Library at Lombard 
and Greene Streets. 

Dr. Noel E. Foss, Dean of the School 
of Pharmacy, presided and Dr. Horn- 
bake was the principal speaker. His sub- 
ject was "The Age of Responsibility." 

The Alumni Association of the School 
of Pharmacy held its annual banquet 
and dance in honor of the school's 
graduating class June 8, in the Univer- 
sity's new Baltimore Union. 

Dr. Louis E. Kazin, editor of Drug 
Topics, was the principal speaker. 

The Alumni Honor Award went to 
Joseph Cohen, '29, graduate of the 
School of Pharmacy. Mr. Cohen is 
Executive Secretary of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association and editor 
of the Maryland Pharmacist. 

Certificates were presented to five 50- 
year graduates by Irving I. Cohen, Presi- 
dent of the Alumni Association, who 
also installed the Association's newly 
elected officers: Simon Solomon, Honor- 
ary President; James P. Cragg, Jr., Presi- 
dent; Samuel A. Goldstein, First Vice 
President; Milton A. Friedman, Second 
Vice President; Frank J. Slama, Execu- 
tive Secretary; and H. Nelson Warfield, 
Treasurer. 

Dr. James E. John, Sr., '13, who 
served in World War One as Chief of 
Dental Service for the American Tank 
Corps of the U. S. Army Expeditionary 
Forces, and in World War Two as Vir- 
ginia Chairman of Dentists, received 
the Distinguished Alumus Award of the 
Alumni Association of the School of 
Dentistry on June 9. 

The award highlighted alumni activi- 
ties held at the Dental School beginning 
that morning with business meetings. 
During the afternoon the Alumni As- 
sociation formally dedicated their gift to 
the Dental School of closed circuit tele- 
vision equipment to be used for educa- 
tional purposes. A scientific program, 
which followed was conducted by Drs. 
Joseph C. Biddix, Donald Gobbs, and 
Jerry Sherman. 

Dr. Daniel F. Lynch, President of the 
Alumni Association, presided at the 
Academic Awards Program on Friday 
morning. 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 



Cliff R. Johnson, Th.D., D.D., pastor 
of Westminster Presbyterian Church of 
Alexandria was the guest speaker at the 
University's Baccalaureate Service in 
Memorial Chapel on June 4. Approxi- 
mately 1,000 University seniors attended 
the service. 



u, 



NIVERSITY COMMENCEMENT EXER- 

cises were celebrated in Germany and 
Japan. Formal commencement cere- 
monies marking the fifth anniversary of 
Maryland's educational program in the 
Far East honored the 62 graduates of 
the 1961 Class. 

More than 800 spectators witnessed 
the proceedings in Tokyo's Kudan 
Kaikan Auditorium on Sunday, March 
26. 

Among high-ranking officials present, 
General Carter B. Magruder received 
the honorary doctorate of Military Sci- 
ence, and His Excellency Shigeru 
Yoshida was awarded an honorary doc- 
torate of Laws. 

General Magruder, Commander in 
Chief United Nations Command, U. S. 
Forces Korea, extended his congratula- 
tions to those awarded degrees. 

Mr. Yoshida responded after receiv- 
ing his honorary degree that he was most 
grateful and honored. He said, "It is an 
honor .... which I am glad to accept 
as an expression of the mutual esteem 
and goodwill that animate the relations 
between the peoples of Japan and the 
United States." 

Calling himself a friend of democracy, 
he continued "I have always striven to 
foster sound development of democracy. 
It remains still my major concern .... 

President Elkins conferred the honor- 
ary degrees as well as those earned by 
Maryland graduates. He said that educa- 
tion is necessary for solution to many 
of the problems confronting the world 
today. "This graduation ceremony," he 
said, "focuses attention on education at 
a time when we are sorely pushed to 
preserve peace and the dignity of man- 
kind all over the world." 

Secretary of the Army Elvis J. Stahr, 
Jr., addressed the 1961 Class of Mary- 
land's European Division in the annual 
cap and gown commencement in Heidel- 
berg, Germany on May 27. 

Nearly 140 students received bachelor 
degrees conferred by President Elkins. 
Other participants included Mr. Charles 
P. McCormick, Chairman of the Board 
of Regents, and University College Dean 
Ray Ehrensberger. 

The commencement was convened in 
the Neue Aule of Heidelberg University. 




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What is 

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THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND ATH- 
letic Department is sponsoring a 
Maryland sports booster group, to be 
known as the "Diamondbackers." Bill 
Cobey, Director of Athletics, feels that 
this organization will be a great stimulus 
to athletics at Maryland, and also enable 
many of the Maryland alumni and fans 
to become a supporting part of the 
athletic program. 

The Diamondbackers as a group will 
differ from the majority of their con- 
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athletic events held at the University. 

Any individual purchasing a season 
ticket to the Maryland football or bas- 
ketball games will be eligible for mem- 
bership in the Diamondbackers. How- 
ever, the Athletic Department realizes 
that there are many alumni and fans 
who are unable to attend all the events, 
so they will grant membership to these 
individuals for an annual donation of 
ten dollars or more to the University's 
Scholarship and Grant-in-Aid Program. 
This program has been the medium 
through which many deserving young 
men have been given the opportunity 
to obtain a college education. 

Membership cards will be issued to 
each applicant upon receipt of his sea- 
son ticket order or his donation. The 
hope of the Athletic Department is that 
alumni and fans will realize the poten- 
tial of this organization and make its 
success possible through their enthusias- 
tic support. With the anticipated growth 
of the organization in the future, it is 
hoped that it will become an integral 
part of the Maryland athletic program. 

A number of schools within the At- 
lantic Coast Conference have been ex- 
tremely successful in organizing similar 
booster clubs. 

The Athletic Department is primarily 
interested in the Diamondbackers be- 
coming an active organization through 
their presence at the athletic events. 
There is nothing more encouraging to 
a team than a large and vocal group of 
supporters cheering them on to victory. 

Many Terp alumni and fans will au- 
tomatically become eligible for member- 
ship by renewing their annual season 
ticket applications. We hope that these 
annual applications will be supplement- 
ed by those interested in promoting the 
athletic program at Maryland and build- 
ing the Diamondbackers into the suc- 
cessful organization it can and will 
become. 

Donations may be made to "Univer- 
sity of Maryland Athletic Department" 
and mailed to P. O. Box 295, College 
Park, Maryland. 

Be a Diamondbacker! 



18 



the Maryland Magazine 



College of 
AGRICULTURE 



A. B. Hamilion 



30th Anniversary 

In 1931 the fifteen seniors at the Alpha 
Gamma Rho fraternity voted to meet 
every five years. This agreement has 
been kept for thirty years. On May 20, 
1961, the group and their wives met at 
the fraternity house and celebrated their 
30th Anniversary. After dinner the fel- 
lows reviewed the growth of the fra- 
ternity and the University and told about 
their exploits. The ladies were enter- 
tained by Mrs. Mary Ahalt, but most 
of the discussion was on children and 
grandchildren. 

Roland Ward, Gaithersburg, president 
of the fraternity in 1931, presided at 
the meeting. As Vernon Holter, Fred- 
erick, called the roll it was noted that 
belts are longer today and combs are 
used less. 

After 30 years, eleven of the fifteen 
were in attendance. The group was hon- 
ored to have as their guest the widow 
of Arthur Ahalt. Holter reported the 
mail to James Coddington and Fred 
Marschalk were returned "unknown." 
Dr. Henry Long wrote from Indianap- 
olis where he is with a large dairy. 
Other members present were Kenneth 
Baker, Silver Spring; Russell Henry and 
Samuel Holter, Frederick; Arthur Mar- 
tin, Baltimore; E. C. McFadden, Mar- 
tinsburg, West Virginia; George Miller, 



Baltimore; Ridgely Parks, Washington; 

Robert Prior. Beltsville, and Robert 
Reedy, Washington, I). C. Other guests 
were G. W. Seabold and A. B. and 

Mrs. Hamilton. 



Rom Ki Willi I.. '16, Ri i IR] s 

Robert White, '16, has retired as gen- 
eral manufacturing manager of the At- 
lanta-headquartered Armour Agricul- 
tural Chemical Co. after 42 years of 
employment. He will be retained as a 
consultant on fertilizer manufacturing 
operations. Mr. White came to Atlanta 
in 1934 as general superintendent of all 
of Armour's fertilizer operations. He 
had served as general manufacturing 
manager since 1955. He is a native of 
College Park and the brother of Dr. 
Charles E. White, Head of the Univer- 
sity's Department of Chemistry. 



Realtor Views Soil Surveys 

Verlin W. Smith. '42, Vice President 
of a prominent real estate firm in Wash- 
ington, D. C, has contributed an article 
to the magazine Soil Conservation. 
Smith explained how he uses soil sur- 
veys in his real estate work to help 
rurbanites and urbanites. He said, 
"Since learning the importance of soils 
and the differences in the quality of the 
soil maps, I have tried, in my profes- 
sional capacity, to pass on this informa- 
tion to clients who buy or sell land. I 
also have spent a great deal of time 
trying to show professional colleagues 
the value of using good soil maps in 
their real estate transactions." 

{Continued on next page) 



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College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Staff of the College 



Dr. Walton Assumes Post At NBS 

Dr. William Walton, '41 and '47, was 
recently appointed Chief of Organic 
Building Materials Section of the Build- 
ing Research Division of the National 
Bureau of Standards. Dr. Walton has 
been with the National Bureau of Stand- 
ards for 31 years. 



Chemistry Department Receives 
Grant 

A grant of $6,000 was awarded to the 
Department of Chemistry by the Na- 
tional Science Foundation for the sup- 
port of basic research entitled "Spectral 
Characteristics of Fluorescent Metal 
Chelates." The grant will be of 20- 
month duration. 



$63,000 Grant For Basic Research 

A $63,000 grant was awarded to the 
Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Ap- 
plied Mathematics by the National 
Science Foundation for support of basic 
research on the "Combined Effect of 
Forced and Free Convection." 



Dr. Astin Directs Scholarship 
Project 

Dr. Alexander W. Astin, '55 and '57, 
will direct a two-year project for the 
National Merit Scholarship Corpora- 
tion on a $50,000 research grant from 
the National Science Foundation. The 
project will study the various kinds of 
influence which different types of col- 
leges have in stimulating their students 
to undertake graduate study. 



Price Family In East Africa 

Donald L. Price, '48, '50 and '59, and 
his wife Ellyn Holt Price, '48, are now 
residing in East Africa, where Mr. Price 
is working out of Makerere College 
Medical School, the University of East 
Africa. He is teaching parasitology 
courses to medical students. The Price 
family went to East Africa after evacu- 
ating from the Congo. Mr. Price is asso- 
ciated with the Medical Service Corps 
of the United States Army. They have 
two children, a girl, eight, and a boy, 
six. 



Alumnus Awarded 
Air Force Fellowship 

The National Academy of Sciences- 
National Research Council announces 
that George Blakely, M.A. '59 and 
Ph.D. '60, has been awarded an NAS- 
NRC Postdoctoral Research Fellowship. 
This program, supported by the Air 
Force Office of Scientific Research of 
the Air Force Research Division, was 
inaugurated in 1960 to provide to young 
investigators of superior ability special 
opportunities for advanced study and 
fundamental research in the various 
branches of the natural and applied 
sciences. These fellowships are admin- 
istered by the Fellowship Office of the 
National Academy of Sciences-National 
Research Council. 

Dr. Blakley will pursue his fellowship 
at Harvard University where he will 
conduct research on functions of a com- 
plex variable in the Department of 
Mathematics. 



Dr. Bode Presents Paper 
to British Academy 

Carl Bode, Professor of English, who 
spent last year as Visiting Professor 
at the University of Wisconsin, present- 
ed a paper, "The Sound of American 
Literature a Century Ago," before the 
British Academy this Spring. 

This was the first lecture on American 
literature ever delivered to the Acad- 
emy, the principal British honorary so- 
ciety for the humanities. It launches a 
new series endowed by the Ellis Phillips 
Foundation in memory of Sarah Try- 
phena Phillips to bring over an Amer- 
ican scholar each year to lecture on 
American literature or history. 

Professor Bode did research for his 
paper on a grant from the University 
of Maryland, which gave him leave to 
spend the academic year at Wisconsin. 
Travel funds were provided by the 
American Council of Learned Societies. 

During the three years Prof. Bode 
spent in England as cultural affairs offi- 
cer for the U. S. Information Agency 
and cultural attache for the U. S. State 
Department, he organized a series of 
lectures by British and American schol- 
ars. These will be published in England 
under the title The Great Experiment 
in American Literature, and later in the 
United States. His article, "The Profes- 
sor and Form 57," which grew out of 
his English experience was published in 
the winter issue of the American Asso- 
ciation of University Professors Bulle- 
tin. 

Professor Bode returned to Mary- 
land in lune to begin research on his 
next book, a study of several leading 
British writers as contrasted with lead- 
ing American writers. He is also writing 
a social history of New England Tran- 
scendentalism. 



20 



the Maryland Magazine 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 

Managing Director 

Jeff Keith, '53, has been appointed Man- 
aging Director of the Pressed Metal 
Institute of Cleveland, Ohio. Mr. Keith 
played varsity football at the University 
under the late Jim Tatum, ending his 
career in the Sugar Bowl. 

Prof. Crowell Appointed 
to National Advisory Council 

Prof. Alfred Crowell, Head of the De- 
partment of Journalism and Public Re- 
lations, has been invited to serve as one 
of twenty-four members of the Educa- 
tional Advisory Council of the Public 
Relations Society of America. An- 
nouncement of Prof. Crowell's selection 
by the Society's Board of Directors was 
made by PRSA President Rear Admiral 
Harold B. Miller, U.S.N. (Ret.), Direc- 
tor of Public Relations of Pan Amer- 
ican World Airways, and PRSA Educa- 
tion and Research Committee Chairman 
Kenneth W. Haagensen, Director of 
Public Relations of Allis-Chalmers 
Manufacturing Company. 

College Administers 
Hospital Institute 

Thirty persons holding supervisory 
positions in the Prince George's General 
Hospital have received certificates for 
successful completion of the Hospital 
Supervisory Planning Institute offered 
by the College of Business and Public 
Administration. 

The Institute was developed and 
taught by Dr. Clinton C. Spivey who 
sought to equip supervisory personnel 
in the Hospital with sound business 
management techniques including the 
latest approaches to organization, com- 
munication, methods improvement, hu- 
man relations and leadership. Two-hour 
sessions were conducted each Monday 
for fifteen weeks in the Hospital itself. 

Graduate Assistant 
Appointed Director 

Mr. Edward Dawson, a graduate assist- 
ant in the Department of Government 
and Politics, has been appointed the 
Executive Director of the Foreign 
Claims Settlement Commission. He has 
completed his course work for his doc- 
torate in Government and Politics at the 
University and plans to continue work 
toward his degree. 

(Continued on next page) 




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Rhode Island Alumni 



The Rhode Island section of the Alumni 
Association, Baltimore College of Den- 
tal Surgery, Dental School, University 
of Maryland, held their annual dinner 
meeting at the Sheraton-Biltmore Hotel, 
Providence, Rhode Island, January 16. 
This annual affair, which always draws 
strong support from alumni in the New 
England area, was held just prior to the 
Rhode Island State Dental Society meet- 
ing. 

On this occasion Dr. Katharine 
Toomey, Administrative Assistant at the 
Dental School, received a Certificate of 
Honor presented by William Decesare, 
'36, President of the Rhode Island State 
Dental Society. Dr. Toomey graciously 
responded and, to the surprise of many 
and with sadness to all, stated that she 
will resign from her duties at the Dental 
School this year. Dr. Toomey has served 
as Administrative Assistant to Dean 
Timothy O. Heatwole, Dean J. Ben 
Robinson, and Dean Myron S. Aisen- 
berg. The genuinely expressed regrets 
of alumni indicated the high esteem in 
which Dr. Toomey is held. 

President Decesare presented the 
Rhode Island Distinguished Alumni 
Award to Edward C. Morin, '20, Paw- 
tucket, the first President of the Rhode 
Island Alumni Section, a Past President 
of the Rhode Island State Dental So- 
ciety, and a friend of many dentists 
within Rhode Island and throughout the 
New England area, and Maryland. 

The faculty members of the Dental 
School who were the essayists and cli- 
nicians at the Rhode Island State Dental 
Meeting were introduced: Dean Myron 
S. Aisenberg, '22 (The Differential Diag- 
nosis of Cancer in and About the Oral 
Cavity); Joseph P. Cappuccio, '46 (The 
Problems of Oral Surgery in Your Prac- 
tice); Edward C. Dobbs, '29 (The Pre- 
vention and Treatment of Dental Office 
Emergencies); Ernest B. Nuttall, '31 
( Present Concepts in Fixed Prosthodon- 
tics); Kyrle W. Preis, '29 (Childhood 
Dental Problems). 

New officers of Rhode Island Alumni 
Section are: President, William Dece- 
sare, '36; First Vice-President, Eric 
Waxberg, '19; Second Vice-President. 
Edward A. Lynaugh, '15; Secretary, 
Charles E. Heaton, '34; Editor, Eugene 
Nelson, '46; Treasurer, Ferdinand Asci- 
olla, '47; Historian, Thomas Payne, '52. 




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22 



the Maryland Magazine 



College of 

EDUCATION 



Mary J. A hall 



An American Goes Abroad to 
Discover America 

After some four months overseas work- 
ing within the University College, Dr. 
Gladys A. Wiggin, Professor of Educa- 
tion, writes: Living in Germany and 
Denmark has opened this American's 
eyes to two charming countries hut has 
also helped her to discover her own 
country. This new insight is hased on 
the theme homegeneity versus heteroge- 
neity. 

Germans are typically either Lutheran 
or Roman Catholic with so small an 
admixture of the other sects that the 
latter are hardly noticeable. About 98 
percent of the Danes are Lutheran. In 
Germany there are predominantly Cath- 
olic and predominantly Lutheran com- 
munities. Contrast this monolithic reli- 
gious environment with that in the 
United States where well over 200 reli- 
gions flourish and where in many areas 
groups are of mixed religious origins. 
I think of my own College Park neigh- 
borhood in which immediate neighbors 
are Methodist, adherents of a small 
Protestant sect, Roman Catholics, and 
Jews — and I am of still another reli- 
gious affiliation. 

The Alpine, Anglo-Saxon, and other 
peoples have melted in the German 
and Danish populations of today. But 
Germans and Danes are still identifiable 
Europeans of admixtures distinct from 
the French and Italian. A man, however, 
who calls himself an American may 
have ancestors from any of the five 
continents, that are Caucasoid, Negroid, 
or Mongoloid — or any variety thereof. 

Practically all German homes pre- 
sent the same basic front to the world: 
a grey-beige stucco and peaked roof. 
Local modifications come only with dark 
wood trims or colored shutters. Modern 
styling is to be found largely in indus- 
trial buildings. Although Americans 
complain about the sameness in single 
housing projects, they can expect some 
variation from project to project and 
in individually built homes, ugly as some 
of them may be. 

Does this modest exploration of 
homogeneity versus heterogeneity have 
a moral? Certainly not in any desire to 
derogate or praise. Rather the moral 
lies in the fact that this American had 
to go abroad to realize how accustomed 
she had become to living with variation 
in religious and nationality backgrounds 
in the social environment, and in food, 
clothing, housing, and geography in the 
physical environment. 

(Continued on next page) 




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Solvay Process Appoints 
hockensmith to new post 

George L. Hockensmith, C.E. '33, has 
been named an Assistant Manager of 
the Syracuse plant of Solvay Process 
Division, Allied Chemical Corporation, 
with responsibility for the plant's indus- 
trial and public relations. 

A former lacross player at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, Hockensmith has 
been an official for high school and 
college lacrosse games in the Central 
New York area. 

Rocketry Executive 

Robert J. Lodge, B.S., M.E., '40, is 
now Manager, Engineering Test, with 
Rocketdyne, a division of North Amer- 
ican Aviation. Subsequent to graduation 
he served for seven years as a test en- 
gineer with the Wright Aeronautical 
Corporation before joining Rocketdyne. 
In this position, he is responsible for 
operations of the most advanced rocket 
research center of the free world, where 
close to 2,000 employees are engaged 
in testing operations of rocket engines 
and propellants. 

Space Scientist 

Juri Kork, who received his B.S. '56 and 
M.S. '58, in Aeronautical Engineering, 
is co-author of a paper, "Nomograms 
for the Solution of Orbital Parameters," 
recently published in Aerospace Engi- 
neering, the official publication of the 
Institute for the Aerospace Sciences. 
While doing graduate work, Mr. Kork 
served as a research assistant with the 
Upper Atmosphere Research Group 
under Dr. S. F. Singer at the Univer- 
sity. In 1958 he joined the Martin Co. 
in Baltimore. His duties have included 
mathematical analyses of satellite re- 
turn-from-orbit and solution of prob- 
lems of satellite lifetime and re-entry. 

A member of the Institute for the 
Aerospace Sciences, Tau Beta Pi, Amer- 
ican Rocket Society, Phi Kappa Phi, 
Mr. Kork has published several papers 
on rocket trajectory, aerodynamic heat- 
ing, re-entry and recovery. 

Lusby Appointed Supervisor 
at Du Pont 

William E. Lusby, Jr., '49, was recently 
appointed supervisor of titanium sponge 
sales. Mr. Lusby taught chemistry and 
worked for the Bureau of Mines on 
titanium research while studying for his 
advanced degree. 



24 



the Maryland Magazine 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



Wakfie-:i d S( hoi arship Aw \kps 

The School oi' Medicine has awarded 
Warfield Scholarships, which provide 
full tuition in the sum of $650. to five 
students: Susan L. Howard, Salisbury; 
Frank R. Lewis, Jr.. Williards; William 
E. Signor, 3rd, Laytonsville; Timothy K. 
Gray and Mitsie P. Stasiowski, both of 
Baltimore. 

Known as the Clarence and Cienevra 
Warfield Scholarships, these scholar- 
ships were established from the income 
of funds provided by the will of Dr. 
Clarence Warfield. an alumnus of the 
School of Medicine. They are awarded 
each year to outstanding applicants who 
have been accepted into the incoming 
freshman class. 

Dr. Pasamanick. Receives Award 

Dr. Benjamin Pasamanick. M.D. '41, 
Professor of Psychiatry at Ohio State 
University and Director of Research at 
the Columbus Psychiatric Institute, re- 
ceived the $500 Stratton Award of the 
American Psychopathological Associa- 
tion for 1961 for his studies on the epi- 
demiology of mental disorder. Dr. 
Pasamanick has received the two major 
awards for research in psychiatry given 
by national organizations, having been 
awarded the Hofheimer Prize of the 
American Psychiatric Association in 
1949 for his studies on child develop- 
ment. 

Dr. Cunningham on Forum 

Raymond M. Cunningham. '49, was a 
participant in a medical forum on the 
use of vasodilators published in the No- 
vember 1, I960 number of Modern 
Medicine. 

Hospital Renovates 
Twelfth Floor 

As a part of a continuing program to 
modernize the University Hospital, a 
newly renovated 12th floor, including 
the most modern concepts of hospital 
design, has been opened to use. 

The new unit designed for the use 
of private patients will serve as a model 
for the planning of further renovations 
in the University Hospital. Another 
newly designed floor, the ninth, is in 
use for neurosurgical patients. Seven 
other floors are scheduled for renova- 
tion in the future. All patient rooms will 
be either private or semiprivate and are 
arranged around a central nurses' sta- 
tion with which communication is main- 
tained through a call system. All ancil- 
lary patient-care services are contained 
in the unit. 

(Continued on next page) 



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25 



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Dr. Edwards Honored 

A testimonial dinner for Dr. C. Reid 
Edwards, Professor Emeritus of Surgery 
at the University of Maryland School 
of Medicine, was held April 27 by the 
School's newly organized Maryland Sur- 
gical Society. Surgical residents who 
had received their training under Dr. 
Edwards came from eighteen states to 
pay him honor. 

In addition to his association with 
the University, which dates back to his 
internship in 1913, Dr. Edwards was 
Works Surgeon at the Western Electric 
Company from 1929 to 1953. The prin- 
cipal speaker of the evening, William 
H. Doherty, Patent License Manager of 
Western Electric in New York City, 
paid tribute to Dr. Edwards for his 
many years of service. He also discussed 
communications in the space age in his 
address "Wires, Waves, and Satellites." 

Dr. George A. Yeager, Professor of 
Clinical Surgery, who was toastmaster, 
called on Dr. William H. Toulson, Pro- 
fessor Emeritus of Surgery, to review 
Dr. Edwards' career. 

Because of Dr. Edwards' special in- 
terest in the graduate training of young 
physicians, an endowment fund was 
established in his name last year and 
will be used largely to support clinical 
research. 

Dr. Edwards is a native of Medley, 
West Virginia, and a graduate of the 
University of Maryland School of Med- 
icine. With the exception of years spent 
in active duty in World War I, he has 
been associated with the School ever 
since graduation, both on the teaching 
staff and as a clinical surgeon at Uni- 
versity Hospital. He was Head of the 
Department of Surgery from 1948, when 
the late Dr. Arthur M. Shipley retired, 
until 1955, when Dr. Robert W. Buxton, 
the present head, was appointed to suc- 
ceed him. 

In 1957 Dr. Edwards received the 
Medical Alumni Association's honor 
award and gold key for his "outstand- 
ing contributions to medicine and dis- 
tinguished service to mankind." 

Dr. Farley with V.A. 

Dr. Hal Dee Farley, '60, has been ac- 
cepted by the Veterans Administration 
Center at Los Angeles for a residency 
in X-Ray. The hospital is affiliated with 
the University of California at Los 
Angeles. 



Col. Woodland Retires 

John C. Woodland, '15, recently has 
been retired from his career as Colonel 
in the United States Army Medical 
Corps. Dr. Woodland has had a distin- 
guished and varied career which has 
included considerable investigative work 
concerning virus and rickettsial diseases. 



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118 S. Eutaw Street 

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26 



the Maryland Magazine 



Following his graduation from the 
School of Medicine, he entered the 
Medical Corps of the United States 
Army in 1917 and saw active duty 
overseas in Germany from l')l l ) to 
1921. He then served as a Medical Offi- 
cer on numerous assignments including 
the Fitzsimmons General Hospital 
(1926-29), the Gorgas General Hospi- 
tal in the Canal Zone ( 1929-1933), and 
the Army and Navy General Hospital 
(1933-1938). He served at Brooke 
Army Hospital, Fort Sam Houston, 
Texas from 1938 to 1947 at which 
time he served as Chief of Medicine 
both at the Army and Navy General 
Hospital and the Brooke Army Hospital. 
At the time of his retirement, he was 
Commanding Officer ot Brooke Army 
Hospital, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 

Psychiatric Institute Receives 
Large Grant 

Dr. Eugene B. Brody, Director of the 
Psychiatric Institute, has announced the 
receipt of a grant of $126,400 for the 
current year from the National Insti- 
tutes of Mental Health. This grant will 
be used for purposes of training in 
psychiatry with some $94,400 of the 
grant being used directly in the grad- 
uate program. 

The program comprises three to five 
years of training for physicians who 
have completed their internships and 
wish to become eligible for certification 
by the American Board of Psychiatry 
and Neurology. This program is direct- 
ed by Dr. Russell R. Monroe, formerly 
of Tulane University, and a national 
authority in psychiatric research and 
education. The remaining $32,000 will 
support the teaching program in psy- 
chiatry for students of medicine. 



School of 

PHARMACY 



Dr. Norman J. Duorenbos 
Dr. B. Olive Cole 



Annual Alumni Banquet 

The 36th Annual Banquet and Dance 
of the Alumni Association of the School 
of Pharmacy was an enjoyable affair, 
held at the Baltimore Union June 8. 

Approximately 400 persons attended, 
including the 1961 graduates and their 
wives, ladies or escorts, and groups of 
parents. 

President Irving I. Cohen welcomed 
the members of the 1961 Graduating 
Class, who were guests of the Associa- 
tion, their parents, members of the 
Alumni, guests and friends. 

(Continued on next page) 



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27 




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Mr. Victor H. Morgenroth, Jr., Chair- 
man of the Executive Committee, was 
the toastmaster, and introduced special 
guests. 

Dr. Louis L. Kaplan brought greet- 
ings from the Board of Regents of the 
University and Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, 
Vice-President for Academic Affairs, 
tendered greetings from the University. 

Dr. Louis E. Kazin, Editor of Drug 
Topics, was the principal speaker and 
outlined the special position which phar- 
macy and pharmaceutical education en- 
joy in health groups in the community, 
and predicted a future full of promise 
for the members of the 1961 gradu- 
ating class. 

Mr. Joseph Cohen, Executive Secre- 
tary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association and of the Baltimore Metro- 
politan Pharmaceutical Association, Edi- 
tor of the Maryland Pharmacist, and 
active in City, State and National phar- 
maceutical affairs, including special in- 
terest in Legislative matters, was pre- 
sented the Honored Alumnus Award for 
1961 by President Irving I. Cohen. 

The Honorary President's Award was 
presented by Dr. Frank L. Black to Mrs. 
Frank M. Budacz, who was Treasurer 
of the Alumni Association for twenty- 
three years. 

The Graduating Class was presented 
by Dean Noel E. Foss, who called spe- 
cial attention to honors received by sev- 
eral of the graduates. 

Mr. Vito Tinelli, Jr., President of 
the 1961 Class, responded. 

Special certificates were presented to 
50-Year graduates of the School. Those 
present to receive the certificates were: 
Dr. Filiberto Artigiana, Baltimore; Dr. 
Paul F. Flynn. Unionville, Conn.; Dr. 
Harry C. Lewis, Cumberland; and Dr. 
George H. Waltz of Baltimore. 

Class reunions were celebrated in 
groups at different tables and repre- 
sented many graduates from other lo- 
calities and states. 

The following officers were installed 
for the year 1961: Honorary President, 
Simon Solomon; President, James P. 
Cragg, Jr.; First Vice-President, Samuel 
A. Goldstein; Second Vice-President, 
Milton A. Friedman; Executive Secre- 
tary, Frank J. Slama; Treasurer, H. Nel- 
son Warfield. 

Members of the Executive Committee 
were: Irving I. Cohen, Chairman; Ro- 
bert J. Kokoski, Harold Levin, Vito 
Tinelli, Jr., with Noel E. Foss and B. 
Olive Cole as Ex-Officio members. 

The following were presented as new 
Associate Members of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation: Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez, Wil- 
liam H. Harrison, and Herman Blum. 

The Past President's Award was pre- 
sented to Irving I. Cohen by newly- 
installed President James P. Cragg, Jr. 

The tables were beautifully decorated 
by Hahn & Hahn in memory of Drs. 
Charles C. Neal, E. F. Kelly and An- 
drew G. DuMez. 



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28 



the Maryland Magazine 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 

(formerly College oj Special and 
Continuation Studies) 

G. Allen Sager 

Notes from the College 

Dr. Joseph O. Legg, '57, was a bit late 
in paying his dues to the Alumni Asso- 
ciation this year. And for good reason. 

During the summer he was a member 
of the U. S. Soil Salinity Delegation 
which visited the U.S.S.R.. touring irri- 
gated areas located in the southern por- 
tion of that country. 

Upon his return to the United States, 
Dr. Legg attended the International Soil 
Servicide Society meetings at Madison. 
Wisconsin, where he again met several 
Russian scientists with whom he had 
become acquainted in the U.S.S.R. 

The family of U. S. Air Force Major 
William B. Hankee is aiding in a small 
but important way the development of 
understanding between the Japanese 
and American peoples. 

Yasuaki Arita, a senior studying busi- 
ness management at Hitotsubashi Uni- 
versity, near Tokyo, visits the Hankee 
home every Sunday afternoon. 

"Arrangements were made by our 
daughter Donna's Japanese piano teach- 
er who also has Yasuaki as a student," 
Major Kankee writes. "The young man's 
primary reason for visiting us is to 
better learn the use of the English lan- 
guage since he hopes to work abroad for 
his company in England or America. 
Donna has, I believe, helped him con- 
siderably in improving his English con- 
versation, having spent many long hours 
on his behalf. 

"In these days of tense relations," 
Major Hankee concludes, "it is import- 
ant to build mutual trust and friendship 
among people and nations. 

"Best wishes from all of us over 
here." 

Major Hankee is serving as Air Oper- 
ations Officer, First Weather Wing Flight 
Section. 

(Continued on next page) 





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COMPLETED 
CAREERS 



Dr. Arthur Nachlas 

Dr. Arthur Nachlas, Med. '32, a Wash- 
ington pediatrician for 25 years, died 
February 12. 1961 of a heart attack 
while attending an infant patient. 

Dr. Richard W. Iskraut 

Dr. Richard W. Iskraut, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Physics and one of the senior 
members of the Department, died 
April 2. 

Professor Iskraut completed his un- 
dergraduate training at the City College 
of New York and received his doctorate 
in theoretical physics from the Univer- 
sity of Leipzig, Germany. 

He became a member of the Univer- 
sity's faculty in 1946. He taught many 
courses here, from the most elementary 
courses for undergraduates to the most 
advanced courses in quantum field 
theory, quantum mechanics, electro- 
dynamics and classical physics. His re- 
search has dealt with meson production 
and other aspects of nonlinear effects 
in physics; for two years — in 1949 and 
again in 1955 — Dr. Iskraut did research 
with the Nobel Prize winner, Werner 
Heisenberg, at the Max Planck Institute 
of Physics in Goettingen, Germany. 

Dr. Iskraut was deeply devoted to the 
University. He took a great interest in 
his students and often spent an unusual 
amount of time counseling them and in- 
spiring them to greater work in physics. 
He was also deeply interested in the 
University Library and has served as 
the Physics Department representative 
for the last eight years; the present col- 
lection in physics was in great part due 
to his painstaking and capable personal 
efforts. 

He is survived by his mother and one 
brother. 

Dr. Albert E. Perron 

Dr. Albert E. Perron, Med. '07, past 
President of the staff of St. Anne's Hos- 
pital of Somerset, Massachusetts, and 
former Assistant Medical Examiner and 
prominent surgeon for 53 years, died 
in November in a Somerset hospital. 

Dr. Charles V. Hayden, Jr. 

Dr. Charles V. Hayden. Jr., Dent. '00. 
died February. 1961 of a cerebral 
hemorrhage at St. Mary's Hospital, 
Leonardtown. Maryland. 

Dr. Hayden was graduated from the 
Dental Department of the Baltimore 
Medical Center, now known as the 
School of Dentistry. 




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the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. Robert Hacon 

Dr. Robert Bacon, Mod. '93, Law '08, 

a Washington physician for more than 
40 years, died January 24, in Fairfax. 
Virginia. 



Lt. Col. Stephen T. Kean 

I.t. Col. Stephen T. Kean, Mil. Sci. '56, 
former Adjutant General for the Army's 
Southern Area Command in Germany, 
died March 25, 1961, in the Munich 
Army Hospital. 

Col. Kean began his Army career in 
1940 as an enlisted man. He was com- 
missioned a second lieutenant in 1942. 
During World War II he served in 
Australia, New Guinea, and the Phil- 
ippines. 

He is survived by his wife, Katherine, 
four children, his mother, four brothers, 
and two sisters. 



Dr. Richard A. Soja 

Dr. Richard A. Soja, D.D.S. '35, died 
recently in Fall River, Massachusetts. 
Dr. Soja had practiced since 1936 spe- 
cializing in orthodontia. 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Eugenia J. Soja, three daughters, two 
brothers, and a sister. 



Fred W. Besley 

Fred W. Besley, Ag. '92, who was 
Maryland's first State forester, died 
November 8 at Laurel General Hos- 
pital. 

Mr. Besley was a forestry official 
from 1906 until his retirement in 1942. 
Most of Maryland's forestry program 
and laws were adopted during his ad- 
ministration. 

He was with the U. S. Forest Service 
for several years before becoming the 
only employee of the newly created 
Maryland Board of Forestry. He also 
was the author of a number of books 
and pamphlets on forestry. 

He leaves two sisters, a brother, two 
daughters, and two sons. 

Sydney Bertram Goldman 

Sydney Bertram Goldman passed away 
in December after a short illness. Mr. 
Goldman was a third-generation tobac- 
conist and owner of Bertram's Briar 
Pipe Shop in Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Goldman practiced law for a 
short time and was an official in Presi- 
dent Roosevelt's NRA program. Mr. 
Goldman soon followed in the footsteps 
of two generations and became a tobac- 
conist, where he designed and made the 
cigarette holder that became a trade- 
mark for one of his first customers, 
Franklin D. Roosevelt. 

He is survived by his wife, Mae, a 
son, his mother, and a brother. 




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Purveyors of Fine 19 27 

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227 S. 

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IA 3-1551 


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Virginia residents JEfferson 4-1110 


Northwest and suburban LOckwood 5-3556 


Baltimore MEdford 3-6500 


Towson VAIley 5-7133 


Glen Burnie SOuthfield 1-0550 


Annapolis COIonial 8-3451 


OFFICES: 


THE DISTRICT, VIRGINIA, 


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FRANK B. JONES 

OPTICIAN 

Over 30 Years Experience 

Dispensing and Manufacturing 
Modern Eye Wear 

Complete Optical Laboratory 
on Premise h 

JUniper 9-8780 

8482 Fenton St. Silver Spring, Md. 



TOWN HALL TAVERN 

TO 9-5814 

Closest Establishment to the Campus 

Mixed Drinks Delicious Pizza 

!135 Baltimore Blvd. ample parking College Park, Md 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

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6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



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Dependable Service Since 1893 

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THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



July- August, J 961 



31 



Directory of Advertisers 



Acme [ron Works 28 

Alcazar 23 

American Disinfectant Company 27 

Anchor Post Products Co., Inc. 31 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., Inc. 31 

Arundel Federal Savings i\ Loan Assn. 24 

Asphalt Service Co., Inc. 25 



Baltimore Envelope Company 
Baltimore Photo & Blue Print Co. 
Hank of < 'risfield 
Bard-Avon School 
Bergmann's Laundry 
Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc. 
Bon T"ii Saratoga Food Products 
Briggs Construction Co., Inc. 
Briggs & Compan> 



Thomas E. Carroll & Sim 
I). Harry Chambers, Opticians 
( ) I.-.'- & Blackwell 
Victor Cushwa & Suns 

I). ('. Ignition Headquarters, Inc. 

Del Haven White House Motel 



Economj Dental Laboratory 
Electronic Wholesalers, Inc. 
Embassy Dairy 

Farmers Cooperative Assn. 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn. lia 

Foreign Mot irs, Ltd. 

Franklin Uniform Co. 

Fuller & d'Albert, Inc. 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co. 
Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Harrington Anns Motel and Apartments 

Harve) Dairy 

Hearn-Kirkwood 

Robert F. lloll. Inc. 



30 
30 
23 

Ml 



2 4 

28 
18 
21 

30 

:k Cover 
29 
17 
28 



Lankford Hotel 

Lord ( alvert Hotel ... 

Lust inc- Nicholson Chevrolet 

Maridel Motel and Cottages 

Maria's Restaurant 

Martin Company 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co. 

Massey-Ferguson, Inc 

Modi i n Machinists Co 



Mel. end Si Romborg Stone Co., Inc 



Norman Motor Co 

North Washington Press, Inc. 



Occidental Restaurant 

Ocean City, Md.. Information Center 
( ties Envelope Corp. 

( )lney inn 

Ottenberg's Bakers, Inc. 



Park Transfer Co. 

Poor, Bowen, Bartlett & Kennedy. Inc. 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co 

Sealtcst Foods 

Seidenspinner Realtor 
Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co... 
Russell W. Smith Insurance. 
Smith Welding Co., Inc. 
Southern Plate Glass Co. 
George II. Stieber Co. 
Strayer College 
Student's Supply Store 

Suburban Trust Co. 

Sweetheart Bread 



Thompson Steel Co.. Inc. 
Town Hall Tavern 

University Hook Store 

Vermont Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 



J 5 
28 
lb 
31 
24 



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Johnston, Lemon X- Co. 

Frank II. Jones. Optician 

E. A. Kaestner Co. 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc. 

King Brothers, Inc., Printing 

Kitcheteria 

K. II. Kocstci Baker) Co. 



23 
28 

28 



Wallop & Son. Insurance 31 

Washington Ply-Rite Co IS 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange, Inc. 20 

Westinghouse Electric Corp. 19 

Perry O. Wilkinson, Insurance 30 

J. McKenny Willis & Son. Inc. 2? 

Duke /lib. it's Restaurant " 



32 



the Maryland Magazine 



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Speaking of Progress 



Progress speaks for itself. 
57,000 members can't be wrong! 



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Dividends compounded and paid quarterly 



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ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON 

Bethesda Branch: 8216 Wisconsin Avenue 
OL 6-3923 

— Home Office — 

610 13th Street, N.W. Washington 5, D. C. 

Dl. 7-2370 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 




magazi no 


















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Volume 



XXXIII Number Five • September-October 1961 



Reporting the Ai imm Tour ro Europe 
The Perilous Road to iiii Si \i\iii 
Tin: Prisoner at Shark's I si wo 
Scholarly Production in Facui n \i rHORS 




RECORD ATTENDANCE. Nearly 19,000 share owners attended the 1961 annual meeting of A. T. & T. This was the largest 
attendance ever recorded by any business. There was full and free discussion of many matters— evidence of democracy at work. 

Now... 2,000,000 Bell Telephone Share Owners 

A NEW MILESTONE IN DEMOCRACY 
AND AMERICAN BUSINESS 



The ownership of the country's 
largest business by over two million 
people is a dramatic testimonial to 
the American economic system. Here, 
for all the world to see, is democracy 
at work. 

The result is a communications 
service of increasing value to both 
the public and business and a vital 
element in national defense. 

The owners of American Telephone 
and Telegraph Company stock are 
people in all walks of life, in every 
section of the country. 



A great many are small share own- 
ers. About 290,000 own fewer than 
ten shares. 42% are women. An ad- 
ditional 31% are joint accounts, gen- 
erally in the names of husband and 
wife. More than 300,000 are tele- 
phone employees. 

In addition to the direct owners, 
many millions of other people have an 
important, beneficial interest through 
the holdings of their insurance com- 
panies, pension funds, investment 
companies, unions, savings banks, etc. 

Without the money that A. T. & T. 



share owners have put in the business, 
you could not possibly have the tele- 
phone service you enjoy today. Nor 
would there be work and wages for 
over 730,000 employees. 

This year alone share owners have 
furnished $961,000,000 in new capi- 
tal by subscribing to A. T. & T. stock. 

Given the opportunity to plan 
boldly for the future — and with earn- 
ings on a level that makes such prog- 
ress possible — you can be sure that we 
will make further contributions to the 
growth and security of the nation. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 




the 




magazine 



JVIair-ylnricl 




Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXIII Number 5 



THE COVER: Maryland rocketed hack into national football prominence with 
its smashing upset over the seventh-ranked team in the nation. Syracuse. 22-21 
On this play, Dick Shiner (14), unable to find a receiver, went 2 l ) yards for 
Maryland's second score of the day. Hit by Syracuse end Tom Mingo (84) on 
the two-yard line. Shiner lunged across the goal. Key blocks by Walter Rock 
(73) and Tom Sankovich (75) helped open the way. Conversion by John 
Hannigan, made it Maryland 14, Syracuse 13. As a result of the Syracuse win, 
the Associated Press ranked Maryland tenth in the Nation: the United Press 
ranked them ninth; Sports Illustrated named Gary Collins "'Lineman of the 
Week"; and United Press International named Coach Tom Nugent "Coach ol 
the Week." For the game-winning, two-point play showing Gary Collins snatch- 
ing the ball over the goal-line, see the inside back cover. 



JL The Alumni Diary 

D Alumni and Campus Notes 

D Reporting the Alumni Tour to Europe 

y The Perilous Road to the Summit 



15 
18 



The Prisoner at Shark's Island 



Scholarly Production by Faculty Authors 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

C. E TUTTLE, Assistant Treasurer 
RICHARD W. CASE 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 

DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. MCCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND B USINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
DR. REGINALD V. TRUITT, '14, President 
DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '11, Vice-President 
HARRY HASSLINGER, '33, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. EDNA L. MESSERSCHM IDT, Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



ADVERTISING DIRECTORS 
MRS. EDITH A. ROSS 
RICHARD F. ROSS 

6451 Blenheim Road 

Baltimore 12, Md. 

DR 7-7692 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March3. 1870. $3.00peryear-Fifty cents the copy Member of American Alumni Council. 



The General Alumni Council 

school and college 
representa ti ves : 

A C HI CU LT I R E 

H. M. Carroll. '20 
Paul M. Galbreath. '39 
Ahram Z. Gottwals. '38 

l R T S i SCIENCES 

Richard Bourne. '57 
Joseph M. Mathias. '35 
Dr. Reginald V. Truitt. 14 

BUSINESS * PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas E. Bourne. Jr.. '43 
Egbert F. Tingley. '27 
Chester W. Tawney. '31 

DENTISTRY 

Dr. Charles E. Broadrup. '32 

Dr. Harry Levin, '26 

Dr. Edward D. Stone. '25 

EDUCATION 

Edward S. Beach. Jr.. '49 

Harry Hasslinger, '33 

Miss Dorothy L. Ordwein. 



'35 



1^ X ('. I N E E R I N G 



Emmett Loane. '29 
Tracy C. Coleman, 
Ben Dyer, '3 1 



'35 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Erna R. Chapman. '34 
Mrs. Ruth T. Clarke, '42 
Mrs. Mary Ward Davis, '55 

I. A W 

Emory H. Niles, '17 

Hon. W. Albert Menchine, '2 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr. 
Dr. Arthur G. Siwinski, '48 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '1 1 



'35 



NURSING 



'29 



Mrs. E. Elizabeth R. Hipp. 

Mrs. Norma S. Long, '49 

Mrs. Kathryn Prokop Donnelly. '48 



PHARMACY 



Hyman Davidov, '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen. '25 
Frank J. Slama, '24 



EXOFFICIO MEMBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Director & Executive Secretary 
Victor Holm, '57 

Field Secretary 
Mrs. Elizabeth Rohr Singleton 

Nurs., '47; Edu., '51 
Harry A. Boswell, Jr.. Past President 
Frank Block, '24, Past President 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19, Past President 



ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES: 
Baltimore — Mrs. Ethel M. Troy. '17 
Frederick County — 

Nelson R. Bohn. '51 
"M" Club — George Knepley. '38 
Montgomery County — 

Robert W. Beall. '31 
New York— Harold McGay. '50 
Prince Georges County — 

Dr. John W. Cronin. '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, '19 
U. S. Depl. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, '26 
Washington County — 

Carson S. Couehman. '51 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



THE GATES HAVE OPENED ... BY THE THOUSANDS THEY HAVE COME. RAT CAPS 
abound (they call them Dinkies now) in the record swarm of humanity 
which covers the expansive acreage of the University campus. 

More significant is the experience being faced by each of the students who 
reportedly found order in the confusion, or confusion in the order of registration. 
Nearly forgotten are the long lines, the scrambling for position, the uncertainty 
of the availability of dormitory rooms, the question mark of whether grades 
were sufficiently good to assure admission, and the fear that courses and pro- 
fessors might be too great a challenge. 

The initial reaction soon rubbed off, and was replaced by positive determina- 
tion to make the grade, improve the record, and successfully grasp every oppor- 
tunity. 

It does not matter that the young freshman is not interested that you climbed 
the old watertower to paint your class numerals on the side . . . and that you 
were caught by some sophomores and almost drowned in the pond by Morrill 
Hall. There is a ho-hum attitude when you report that your freshman class 
pulled the sophs into Paint Branch so you could discard your "rat caps" forever. 
Your listener seems ever more engaged in his own thoughts when you talk about 
the football greats of such a few years ago who joined you in your sophomore 
year to pull the freshmen into the same Paint Branch. 

Every student is important and every alumnus is significant. Here are com- 
bined the nostalgia of the past and the dreams of the future. 

I was developing this thought during registration week as some 14,000 poured 
through the Armory on the College Park campus. One youngster called to a 
friend across the wood shavings sprinkled on the Armory floor, "Hey, big man" 
— obviously the friend was a BMOC ("Big Man On Campus" to the uninitiated 
alumnus). Later in the day we had the rich experience of visiting a Crippled 
Children's Center as a part of a personal effort to direct a campaign to establish 
a new headquarters and State treatment center. An eight- or nine-year-old boy, 
with braces on both legs and a crutch under each arm, came sailing down the 
hall. He literally slid his brakes and came to a clattering halt at our shoe tops. 
Then slowly letting his eyes travel some 6'4" and setting his face in a big smile 
he said, "Hi, big man." 

In a young mind which propelled a determined youngster, I was established 
as a "big man." The image of a "big man" varies with the eyes and age of the 
viewer. The key word is success. 

We want to see every student succeed in his University experience so he may 
have the maximum opportunity for success in adult life. 

By the same token each alumnus is significant, for the success he may achieve 
is an added feather in the cap of the institution from which he received his basic 
foundation. 

Therefore, whether you say "Hey, Big Man" as a student or "Hi, Big Man" 
to an alumnus is of no importance. In one instance you speak in terms of the 
present to those who have already accomplished. In the other you speak to those 
who will soon be "the present" of another generation. In either case the Maryland 
stamp will show and the salutation "Big Man" will be appropriate. 

Sincerely. 




phX_^ 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



the Maryland Magazine 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



OCTOBER 

6 Soccer, Virginia, Home 

Football, Syracuse, Home 
9 Soccer, North Carolina State. 

Home 
14 Football, North Carolina, Home 

2 1 Football, Air Force, Away 

28 Football, South Carolina, Away 

30 Golf Club, All University of 

Maryland Club Tournament 



NOVEMBER 

4 Football, Penn State. 

Homecoming 
II Football. North Carolina State. 

Home 
14 Soccer, Johns Hopkins. Home 

16 Soccer, Catholic University. 

Home 
18 Football. Wake Forest (Band 

Day), Home 

22-27 Thanksgiving Recess Begins 
After Last Class 

25 Football, Virginia, Away 



DECEMBER 

2 Basketball. Penn State. Away 

6 Basketball, Georgetown, Home 

12 Basketball. North Carolina. 

Home 
15 Basketball, Minnesota. Home 

l(S Basketball. Wake Forest. Home 

18 Basketball. Virginia, Away 

20 Christmas Recess Begins After 

Fast Class 
29-30 Basketball. Sugarbowl Tourna- 
ment, Away 



Ten Firms Join 
Business Associates 

To meet the challenge of competition, 
ten business firms have joined the Uni- 
versity's Business Associates Program. 

This program recognizes the continu- 
ing needs of the business world for up- 
to-date information on the University's 
research and faculty advancement pro- 
grams. Not only will this provide busi- 
ness with an effective means for busi- 
ness leadership, but it is also designed 
to strengthen and utilize the services of 
the University. 

Personal service is provided to par- 
ticipating firms in conjunction with 
campus recruiting, a valuable assistance 
in the face of the increasing level of 
this activity. Approximately 300 recruit- 
ing teams visited the College Park, 
campus last year. 

Participating firms also receive ab- 
stracts of research papers, progress re- 
ports on research projects, and copies 
of theses and published research papers, 
on request, in their own field of interest. 
They also receive notices of colloquia, 
special seminars and conferences. 

Twice each year, in the Spring and 
the Fall, conferences will be held to 



provide member firms with the oppor- 
tunity to be briefed on current local 
and national affairs which affect the 
economy of the business community. 
An opportunity is also provided to meet 
with academic personnel and to develop 
constructive contacts with the depart- 
ments in the University in which the 
firms are interested. 

The Business Associates Office acts 
as a liaison for firms in helping them 
contact faculty members for consulting 
services. Special attention is given to 
requests for research, special confer- 
ences and courses, all of which can be 
of material assistance in current busi- 
ness operations. 

Annual payments are made by par- 
ticipating firms in the program, with 
proceeds going to the faculty develop- 
ments of the departments designated 
by the member firm. 



Director of Admissions and Regis- 
trations G. Watson Algire said Jan- 
uary 1 had been established as a 
deadline date for applications from 
students who planned to enter the 
University for the 196)2 spring 
semester. 



Two Appointments in 
School of Social Work 

The appointment of two associate pro- 
fessors, Miss Mary Marion McGinn is 
and Miss Irma L. Stein, to the stall ol 
the newly established School of Social 
Work has been announced by Dr. Veil 
S. Lewis, Professor of Social Work and 
Dean of the School. 

Miss Stein comes to Maryland from 
New York University's Graduate School 
of Social Work, where she has been 
Assistant Professor in case work for 
the past year. 

Her prior teaching experience in- 
cludes a year at Bryn Mawr's Graduate 
School of Social Work, a year at Rut- 
gers' Graduate School of Social Work, 
and three years at Columbia Univer- 
sity's New York School of Social Work, 
where she has also completed most ol 
the work toward a doctoral degree. 

Miss Stein earned her bachelor's de- 
gree at Hunter College and her master's 
degree at the New York School of So- 
cial Work. She has had considerable 
experience as a social worker in New 
York City, including a period as ad- 
ministrator of the psychiatric clinic of 
the City Magistrate Court. 



September-October, J 96 J 



3 



Miss McGinnis, a graduate of West- 
hampton College, University of Rich- 
mond, and of the Pennsylvania School 
of Social Work, has done graduate work 
at Boston Psychoanalytic Institute, Bos- 
ton University School of Social Work, 
and a number of other centers in 
Boston. 

She has had many years of teaching 
and professional experience in the fields 
of child development and child therapy 
at Children's Hospital, Boston College. 
Boston University, Simmons College, 
and Harvard College in Boston; at the 
University of Pittsburgh, and at Tulane 
University. 




at the ANNUAL MEETING of the Maryland 
State Dental Association in Baltimore the 
rare distinction of honorary membership 
was bestowed upon Katharine Toomey in 
recognition of her devoted services. Dean 
Emeritus J. Ben Robinson, a Past Presi- 
dent of the Association, presented her with 
a plaque to commemorate the occasion. 

Miss Toomey received a certificate of 
meritorious award from William F. Dece- 
sarc '36, at a meeting of the Rhode Island 
Alumni Section earlier this year. 



President Kennedy's Party 
for TERPS 

Terps numbered 180 in the crowd of 
1,444 area foreign students who at- 
tended the reception at the White House. 

The reception was designed to show 
President Kennedy's interest in develop- 
ing better relations between Americans 
and citizens of foreign countries. 

Peter Fulde, a graduate student from 
Germany, said, "To meet the President 
is one of the things every student wants 
to do." 

Mrs. Nguyen Anh of Vietnam ex- 
pressed herself by saying: "Everyone 
was excited. We are very proud to be 
invited by the President. It means that 
he is interested in the foreign students 
and better understanding." 



Available ... for the Asking 

Alumni and friends of the University 
may obtain copies of principal speeches 
delivered on campus, by writing to the 
Reference Journal, Room 127, Admin- 
istration Building, University of Mary- 
land at College Park. Available are: 

"A Quantity of Quality" (1957) and 
"The Climate of the University" 

(1960) by President Elkins. 

"The Outlook for the West Today" 

(1961) by Dr. Arnold J. Toynbee. 
"Conflict in Education between Sci- 
ence and Humanism" by Agnes E. 
Meyer. 

"What Good is a University in 

America" by Dr. Harold R. W. 

Benjamin. 

Also available is The University 

Choir at the Casals Festival (1960), 

a 20 minute, 16 mm. sound film in 

color. 

Alumni should acquaint themselves 
with another University service, the 
Speakers Bureau. The Speakers Bureau 
brings the educational services, faculty 
and staff to the people of the State. Its 
roster lists more than 100 speakers of 
300 subjects. 

Topics range from the "Military His- 
tory of the Civil War" to "Problems of 
the ex-Belgian Congo." At least two 
weeks advance notice is requested. 
Write Speakers Bureau, North Admin- 
istration Building, University at College 
Park for a copy of the Roster. 



Salary Offers to Science 
Graduates are Up 27 Percent 

Salary offers to University science 
graduates by industry, business, and the 
Federal government have increased 
about 27 percent since 1957, accord- 
ing to a report by the University's 
Placement Service. 

The report, which was prepared by 
Lewis M. Knebel, Director, was based 
on the results of those companies that 
recruited on campus and reports by 
government officials. It dealt exclu- 
sively with June graduates who received 
B.S. degrees mainly in the technical 
fields. 

Mr. Knebel's report shows average 
salaries of June graduates in technical 
fields ranging from $477. per month for 
government jobs to $563. per month 
from the aircraft industry. These figures 
are compared with a $378. per month 
to $487. per month 1957-range in the 
same fields. 

Year 1957 was chosen for compari- 
son because it was a year of high salary 
offers resulting from a large demand for 
graduates in technical fields and a rela- 
tively low supply. 



The largest salary hike over the four 
years has occurred in the government. 
The average salary offered there rose 
$99., or 27 percent, since 1957. 

The smallest increase in salary offers 
is in the automotive field. The average 
there rose only $48. or 1 1 percent. 

However, although government salary 
averages represent the greatest increase, 
it still offered the lowest average salary 
to graduates in technical fields. 

The actual offers this year, as dis- 
tinct from the averages, ranged from 
a high of $700. per month in aeronau- 
tical engineering to a low of $390. per 
month in business and public adminis- 
tration and education for industry. 



5,336 New Students 
Accepted 

A total of 5,336 new applications for 
admission to the College Park campus 
of the University have been approved 
for the fall semester. 

Of this number 4,284 are Maryland 
residents and 1,052 are from out-of- 
State. The number of Maryland women 
who were accepted totaled 1,701. A 
total of 2.583 Maryland men were ac- 
cepted. Men accepted from out-of- 
State totaled 595. Out-of-State women 
totaled 457. 

The figures include both new fresh- 
men and transfer students. 

University officials estimated that 
about 80 percent of the accepted stu- 
dents would actually register. The total 
student body is estimated to top 14,000 
undergraduate, graduate and part-time 
students. Last year's enrollment was 
13,336 on the College Park campus. 



Fund Grows to $514,848 

In a recent letter to alumni. Albert E. 
Goldstein. M.D., Chairman of the 
Greater University of Maryland Fund 
and Howard C. Filbert, Jr., National 
Canvass Chairman, reported that on 
June 30, total contributions since Janu- 
ary 1, 1958, have amounted to $514,848. 
through 10,825 individual contributions. 

Credit was given to the cooperation 
of loyal alumni and to the hard working 
organization of volunteers. 

Gifts and allocations for research and 
the Distinguished Faculty Program have 
topped the list with contributions total- 
ling $269,267. The Baltimore Union 
has received $87,732., and Student Aid, 
$83,965. Unrestricted gifts to be allo- 
cated among originally specified fund 
projects amount to $68,845.; library 
projects have received $4,039. 



the Maryland Magazine 



Mr. C. M. White Wins 
Gary Medal 

Charles M. White, Engineering, '13, 
Honorary Chairman of Republic Steel 
Corporation, was awarded the Gar} 
Memorial Medal — the highest honor ol 
American Iron and Steel Institute. 

Mr. White was awarded the medal 
for his "outstanding achievements as a 
strong and successful leader in a keenly 
competitive industry, in well earned rec- 
ognition of his important contributions 
to the development of his company and 
his devotion and service to the entire 
iron and steel industry." 

The presentation was made by B. F. 
Fairless, President of the Institute, on 
behalf of the Board of Directors. 

Law Enforcement Institute 

Climaxing its eleventh successful year, 
the University's Law Enforcement In- 
stitute held its annual Certificate Cere- 
monies on the College Park campus this 
summer. 

Three hundred and twenty area law 
enforcement officers were awarded cer- 
tificates by Dr. Thomas B. Symons, 
member of the University's Board of 
Regents. The ceremonies were presided 
over by Mr. Richard H. Stottler, Direc- 
tor of Institutes at University College. 

Principal speaker at the ceremonies 
was The Honorable Thomas B. Finan, 
Attorney General of the State of Mary- 
land, who expressed deep pride at the 
efforts of law enforcement personnel to 
up-lift themselves and their profession 
in the eyes of the public. He emphasized 
the vital importance of well-trained law 
enforcement personnel in modern so- 
ciety. 

The men and women receiving cer- 
tificates represented 38 police depart- 
ments from Maryland, the District of 
Columbia and Virginia. Over 400 law 
enforcement personnel had registered 
in the program. Most of them spend 
their own time and money seeking to 
improve their effectiveness in the field 
of law enforcement. 

Student Memorial Fund 

President Wilson H. Elkins and Dean 
Ray Ehrensberger of University College 
have approved a memorial fund to be 
established in honor of the 12 Munich 
Branch students who were killed last 
December 17 in an airplane crash in 
downtown Munich. 

Relatives, friends, fellow students, 
faculty members and staff members of 
the University, and the general public 
are invited to contribute to the fund. 



Dividends accruing each year from 
the invested fund will be awarded as a 
cash prize to a Munich Branch sopho 
more who. during lour semesters al the 
Branch, has demonstrated the highest 

academic record and In vote ol the 

faculty council is considered must 
worth} to receive the award. 

After discontinuance ol the Munich 
Branch, the award will be made to a 

College Park sophomore under the cri- 
teria to be established at that time. 
The Branch has had a memorial 

plaque made, which lists the names 
Of the crash victims. The plaque has 
been housed in the Munich Branch 
library. 

Contributions to the fund should be 
directed to the University of Maryland, 
APO 407, U. S. Forces. 

Clinical Center 
Under Construction 

The University is using a grant of 
$601,686 from the National Institutes 
of Health to construct a clinical research 
center at University Hospital devoted to 
fundamental studies of disease in man. 

The award was announced by Dr. 
William S. Stone, Dean of the School 
of Medicine, who stated that Dr. 
Theodore E. Woodward, Head of 
the Department of Medicine, will be 
responsible investigator of the new 
Center. Dr. Thomas B. Connor, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Medicine and Head 
of the division of endocrinology and 
metabolism, will be the active Director. 

The Center, Dean Stone states, will 
serve as the nucleus of a broad research 
program aimed at a more rational ap- 
proach to the treatment and prevention 
of human disease. 

Many of the major medical advances 
of the present century have been made 
possible through discoveries relating to 
the nature of the living cell and its 
function. Much of this intimate knowl- 
edge has been gained through painstak- 
ing biophysical and biochemical study 
of living organisms. 

Animal experimentation has contrib- 
uted a great deal. But physiological re- 
actions of animals often differ from 
human reactions. To understand human 
disease, the clinician must collaborate 
with the basic scientist in studying fun- 
damental disease processes in human 
patients. This can best be done through 
such means as are planned in the new 
Clinical Research Center. 

The new Center will consist of ten 
beds, a diet kitchen, and adjacent re- 
search laboratories on the third floor of 



I niversit) Hospital I In.- candidate t>>i 
admission i>> the < entei will be a pa- 
tient whose illness presents a ipecific 
uiL-dicil problem. I he illness nsdi n 
be quite •> common one; yel there i 
be .in .ihinMin.il underlying biochemical 
reaction which clarification ma) lead 
to further understanding ol the cause 
ol the disease or us alleviation 

I'.iiienis consenting to hospitalization 
in this unit i<>i a few da\s or several 
weeks may be assured thai thej will 
receive the best medical treatment and 

nursing care possible and will nc\ci be 

subjected to untried procedures oi med- 
ications which ma\ be harmful i>i haz- 
ardous in any way. I heir health and 
well-being will always be given primary 
consideration; yet their participation in 
intensive studies will assist in advancing 
the boundaries of medical knowledge. 

I here will be no charge tor the hos- 
pital and medical care, which is a fac- 
tual recompense for the patient's con- 
tribution to the research effort. 

The patient will occupy a private or 
a two-bed room. The diet will be pre- 
pared in accordance with the likes and 
dislikes oi the patient and its ingredi- 
ents will be measured precisely. The 
timing of tests and collection of speci- 
mens will confirm to specific schedules, 
which will vary with the problem under 
investigation. 

All this requires the technical and 
professional services of many people. 
Present plans call for about eight tech- 
nicians, six nurses, three research fel- 
lows, a biochemist, a recreation thera- 
pist, a social worker, and a dietitian. 

The unit will be under the direction 
of the Department of Medicine because 
many of the diseases treated there lend 
themselves to such study- — arthritis and 
disorders of the thyroid, kidney, and 
bone, for example. Patients from other 
areas will also be studied, however — 
for example, surgery, pediatrics, ob- 
stetrics and gynecology, and infectious 
diseases (whose metabolic aspects have 
as yet been largely unexplored). 

University Hospital's new Center will 
be one of several such units in the coun- 
try. Their prototype was the so-called 
"Metabolism Ward," which was found- 
ed in 1913 at Bellevue Hospital in New 
York. There followed in 1925 the 
famous "Ward 4" at Massachusetts 
General Hospital, whose historj has 
been related in Dr. James Howard 
Means' book Ward 4 ( Harvard Univer- 
sity Press, 1958). More recently, in 
1953, the National Institutes of Health 
established its Clinical Center, which 
has been described as "a 500-bed Ward 
4." 



September-October, 1961 







'«^ SI 

I* 



k 




: a *%- 




\*mm .A * : 



Reporting the Alumni Tour to Europe 



by Victor Holm, Alumni Field Secretary 



ON JUNE 27, SOME 73 MARYLAND ALUMNI AND THEIR 
families took off from Friendship Airport for a month- 
long tour of Europe. This is a photographic report 
of what they saw and what they did. 

We visited London proper, Stratford-on-Avon, Windsor 
Stoke Poges, Warwick Castle, Hampton Court Palace, Oxford 
and the beautiful country-side surrounding London. Ken 
Rhodes of Silver Spring, Kathryn Finch of Bethesda and 
Carroll Villaret of Towson became the official note-takers 
of all we did and saw. 

A quick trip across Holland with a stop at the Hague and 
we were in the Cathedral city of Cologne, Germany. We 
boarded a Rhine Steamer at Bonn and spent the afternoon 
cruising down the Rhine viewing the beauty of the Rhine 
valley with its castles and vineyards until we reached the 
lovely spa of Wiesbaden. 

In Heidelberg we visited the nerve center of the University 
of Maryland Overseas Program. One of the highlights of 
the entire trip was the unexpected tour led by Dr. Don Totten, 
Assistant Director of the Overseas Division. Dr. Totten took 
us around the Neckar Valley and far off the beaten tourist 
path into the hills to visit quaint old towns such as Mickel- 
stadt and Ehrbach with its ivory factory. We had lunch at the 
old baronial castle at Hirschhorn. Heidelberg itself was a 
delight with its old schloss, the monstrous wine barrels, and 
the shopper's paradise in the many small shops. 

Lucerne was next after a drive through the Black Forest 
and a stop at the little village of Titisee and the Rhine Falls at 
Schaffhausen. None of the group will forget Lucerne: the 
beautiful lake, the night boat ride to the Swiss village for real 



country entertainment, the evening at the Flora, the scramble 
to buy a Swiss watch, but above all the cogwheel railway ride 
to the top of Mt. Pilatus. Few thought that anything could 
be more thrilling until they entered the cable car for the 
breathtaking ride down. But one thrill followed another as 
the next day we drove through William Tell country and 
started the trip across the high Alps to Italy. We moved on 
to Milan to see the cathedral and La Scala. After a brief 
overnight stop in Milan we continued across the Lombardy 
plains to Verona, Padua and ultimately to the most unusual 
city in Europe, Venice. Boats, canals, gondolas, St. Mark's 
Square, pidgeons, jewelry and glass, the Doges Palace and 
music are all a part of the memory of Venice. 



LORENCE UNFOLDED ART TREASURES IN THE PITTI PALACE 

and many churches. We learned about the Medici family 
and Michelangelo. The beautiful leather goods and mosaic 
art added a little more to the souvenir bag before we left 
for Perugia, Assisi and Rome. Two thousand years melted 
away in Rome as we viewed the remains of the head of the 
Roman Empire. The Forum, the Colosium. the Baths of 
Caracalla (where we saw an opera) and many other me- 
morials to once great Rome arc mingled among the activity 
of modern day Rome. We threw coins in the Trevi Fountain, 
marveled at the size of St. Peter's Church and the beauty 
of the Vatican Museum and the Sistine Chapel. Some of us 
dined at Alfredo's and took a carriage ride around the city. 
Some went to Tivoli, some shopped. But we all made it to 
our bus for the ride to Pisa for a look at the leaning tower 



the Maryland Magazine 






opposite page: part of the tour group at Versailles, upper left: 
Judge Ralph Shitre, Paul Dobhs and Dr. Jesse Greenberg stroll 
across the square at Ehrbach, Germany, upper right: Page and 
Vic Holm at St. Mark's Square, Venice, lower left: Angelo 
Puglise, Anne Finch, Dr. Leonard Hays and Patricia Coates at Mt. 
P Hat us, Switzerland. 



and then to Rapallo for some sun and our first swim in the 
Mediterranean. 

The real Riviera is Nice. Everyone became sunburned, but 
all wanted to stay longer. The beach was rocky, but none 
minded; the water, the sun and the atmosphere made up for 
it. But extra days in Nice were out of the question and the 
anticipation mounted as we approached the time to leave 
Nice, Monaco with its casino, the drive along the Low and 
High Corniche, and depart for five glorious days in Paris. 

As with most other tours, we could make a story out of 
Paris alone. There is something for everyone, history, beauty, 
fashion, food, entertainment. We did it all, and most of us 
would like to go back and do some more. Judge and Mrs. 
Ralph Shure checked the bookstalls along the Seine, and Dr. 
and Mrs. Jesse Greenberg of New Jersey finally found a way 
to ship their loot home. Kim Hill and Sue Mullan tried the 
snails at the Cafe de la Paix and Dr. and Mrs. Oggesen went 
to the Crazy Horse for the show there. We all went to the 
Follies and the Lido where we ran into Ed Sullivan scouting 
talent. 

Perhaps the trip can best be summed up by a paragraph 
we received from Mr. George Mintz of New Jersey. He wrote, 
"Edie and I went to Europe on our own two years ago. It 
cost us twice as much and we didn't see half as much as we 
did on the Maryland Tour. Group travel is the only way to 
go, and if our health and money hold out. you can count on 
us as regulars for any future trips." 



September-October , 1 96 1 



Tour Members 

Mr. \nd Mrs. J. Hall Barton, Agricul- 
ture. '20. 

Mrs. Bernard O. Bent. Arts & Sciences, 
'29. 

Mrs Hi don J. Cairns, Agriculture. '53. 

Dr. \m> Mrs. Thomas S. Chandler 

Dr. ami Mrs. Charles H. Coates, DDS, 
'32 and Miss Patricia Coates. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Dobrowolski. 
Business & Public Administration. '47. 

Mrs. Frances E. Evangelist. Education, 
'56. 

Mrs. Cathryn R. Finch and Miss Anne 
D. Finch. Engineering, '41. 

Dr. and Mrs. N. Lawrence Fisch, DDS, 
'31. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Francis, M. Educa- 
tion, '52. 

Mrs. Mildred W. Going, Arts & Sciences, 
'47. 

Dr. and Mrs. Jesse J. Greenberg, DDS. 

Dr. Leonard Hays, Medicine, '13. 

Miss Rosemary K. Hill, Nursing, '61. 

Mrs. A. Herbert Kyler 

Mrs. William L. Lloyd, Education. '54. 

Miss Elsie M. McCormick, Nursing, '58. 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter L. Oggesen, DDS, 
'26. 

Mr. and Mrs. George J. Mintz. Business 
& Public Administration, '32. 

Miss Sue Anne Mullan, Nursing, '59. 

Dr. and Mrs. Anthony J. Pepe 

Angelo S. Puglise, Business & Public 
Administration, '59. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kennard Rhodes, 
Jr., Education, '41. 

Dr. and Mrs. Jean D. Ross, DDS, '34 and 
Miss Lynn Ross. 

Mrs. Nell Samuelson, Education, '54. 

Mrs. Lloyd P. Shank, Business & Public 
Administration, '30. 

Miss Alice A. Shepherd, Home Eco- 
nomics, '50. 

Judge and Mrs. Ralph G. Shure, Arts 
& Sciences, '32. 

Miss Regina E. Sroka, Nursing, '59. 

Mrs. Carroll Villaret, Arts & Sciences, 
'56. 

Dr. and Dayton O. Watkins, Medicine, 
'41. 

Mrs. Ruth F. Watkins 

Mrs. Mercedes B. Wilhelm, Nursing, '19. 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Holm, Arts & Sci- 
ences, '57, and Education, '55. 



above: Judge Shure and Mrs. Walter 
Oggesen view the Leaning Tower of Pisa. 
below: Dr. and Mrs. Jean D. Ross look 
over the old city of Perugia, Italy. 





KENNEDYS DILEMMA 




Should the United States Resume 
the Perilous Road to the Summit? 



EVEN BEFORE HIS INAUGURATION, PRESIDENT-ELECT 
John F. Kennedy was pressed to continue the per- 
sonal diplomacy at the summit engaged in by former 
President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Premier Nikita S. 
Khrushchev of the Soviet Union indicated his desire to meet 
with the new President at an early date, the press reported 
rumors of a possible full-scale East-West summit conference 
this spring or summer, and the leaders of the major powers 
resumed their mutual exchanges of visits for personal and 
private consultations. 

As a matter of fact, the new Administration has already 
been caught up in the momentum of summitry which has 
been developing for the past decade. It has continued the 
practice of receiving foreign chiefs of state and heads of 
government in formal and informal visits, and the President 
and Mrs. Kennedy were warmly received in official state 
visits to Paris and London this spring, during which the Pres- 
ident and the foreign leaders were able to engage in serious 
summit consultations. 

Most important, perhaps, were the "informal" but "somber" 
and "comprehensive" talks engaged in by the new President 
with Premier Khrushchev in Vienna, June 3 and 4. Although 
they discussed the crisis in Laos and "peaceful coexistence," 
they concentrated primarily on the problems of general dis- 
armament, a nuclear test ban, and a peace settlement with 
Germany. It was at this time that the Soviet leader handed 
President Kennedy two memoranda; one was concerned with 
the ending of nuclear weapons tests and the second pertained 
to the concluding of a peace treaty with East Germany and 
the Berlin question. It was the latter issues, as noted earlier, 
which sparked the negotiations leading to the Paris Summit 
Conference of 1960, and which were deferred pending the 
American presidential election. More recently the Soviet Gov- 
ernment unilaterally revived its testing of nuclear weapons. 

The general East-West diplomatic crisis which ensued 
induced the delegates at the summit conference of the twenty- 
five "uncommitted" nations held at Belgrade in early Septem- 
ber to dispatch two emissaries to Washington and two to 



Moscow to urge President Kennedy and Premier Khrushchev 
to meet again in an attempt to resolve the crisis — to continue 
personal diplomacy at the summit. 

The pressures on President Kennedy to resort to the summit, 
therefore, are great, and they may very well become over- 
whelming. Nevertheless, regardless whether serious and suc- 
cessful negotiations may be achieved, the path of summitry 
is by no means an easy one. This is clearly illustrated by the 
experiences of the past few years. 

The World War II summit conferences of the President 
of the United States, the Prime Minister of the United King- 
dom, and Marshal Joseph V. Stalin of the Soviet Union came 
to an end at Potsdam in 1945, and the last meeting of the 
Council of Foreign Ministers, which negotiated the Axis 
satellite peace treaties and dealt with other important postwar 
problems, adjourned in June, 1949. 

Despite the Cold War and the Korean hostilities, it was 
not until May 1 1, 1953, after the death of Stalin, that Prime 
Minister Winston Churchill suggested reviving the wartime 
practice of face-to-face meetings of heads of government. 
Following a session of the East-West Foreign Ministers at 
Berlin in January-February, 1954 (to consider the matter of 
a German peace settlement); the Geneva multipartite Foreign 
Ministers' conference of April-July, 1954 (concerned with 
Korea and Indo-China); public and political pressures in 
France, the United Kingdom, and the United States (particu- 
larly the support of Senator Walter F. George. Chairman of 
the Senate Foreign Relations Committee); and Soviet agree- 
ment to consummate the Austrian state treaty — the first formal 
East-West Great Power summit conference was held at Gene\ a 
in July, 1955. 



Dr. Elmer Plischke, 

Professor and Head 

Department of Government and Politics 



September-October , 1961 



Geneva Summit Conference, July, 1955 

In proposing this heads of government conclave, the West- 
ern powers recognized that the outstanding problems in East- 
West relations could not be resolved in a single meeting. In 
their tripartite note of May 10, 1955, to the Soviet Union, 
they stated: 

In view of their complexity and importance, our sug- 
gestion is that these problems be approached in two 
stages. We think it would be fruitful to begin with a 
meeting of the Heads of Government, accompanied by 
their Foreign Ministers, for an exchange of views . . . 
they would not undertake to agree upon substantive 
answers to the major difficulties facing the world. Such a 
meeting could, however, provide a new impetus by estab- 
lishing the basis for the detailed work which will be 
required. 

This first stage would lay the foundation for the 
second stage in which the problems would be examined 
in detail by such methods, organs, and participants as it 
appears will be most fruitful according to the nature of 
the issues. . . . 

In a radio-television address on July 15, as he was about 
to depart for Geneva, President Eisenhower described the 
nature of the conference, and his role therein, in the following 
words : 

. . . Within a matter of minutes I shall leave the United 
States on a trip that in some respects is unprecedented for 
a President of the United States. Other Presidents have 
left the continental limits of our country for the purpose 
of discharging their duties as Commander-in-Chief in 
time of war or to participate in conferences at the end 
of the war, and to provide for the measures that would 
bring about a peace. 

But now, for the first time, a President goes to engage 
in a conference with heads of other governments in order 
to prevent war; . . . 

... I go for a very serious purpose. This purpose is 
to attempt, with my colleagues, to change the spirit that 
has characterized the intergovernmental relationships of 
the world during the past ten years. 

At the conference table, in his opening statement at the 
plenary session of July 18, the President declared: 

. . . We cannot expect here, in the few hours of a few 
days, to solve all the problems of all the world that need 
to be solved. Indeed, the four of us meeting here have 
no authority from others that could justify us even in 
attempting that. 

Nevertheless, we can, perhaps, create a new spirit that 
will make possible future solutions of problems which 
are within our responsibilities. And, equally important, 
we can try to take here and now at Geneva the first 
steps on a new road to a just and durable peace. 



The heads of government concluded their deliberations by 
instructing their Foreign Ministers to continue the quadri- 
partite negotiations. The latter met at Geneva from October 
27 to November 16, at the conclusion of which Secretary of 
State John Foster Dulles reported to the American people 
on November 18 that the ministerial conference was barren 
of accomplishment, and that "this Geneva meeting did not 
reach any agreements." 

Then followed a period of two years during which little 
pressure was exerted for a return to a summit conclave. 
However, in September, 1955, commenced the series of Eisen- 
hower-Bulganin summit written exchanges, designed at the 
outset to continue the negotiations commenced at Geneva. 
A year later, on October 10, 1956, the United States, the 
United Kingdom, and France sent identical notes to the Soviet 
Government urging the implementation of the decisions of 
the Geneva Summit Conference respecting German unity. 

During the following year the Suez crisis, the Hungarian 
revolt, the internal Soviet struggle for power in which 
Khrushchev emerged victorious, the Syrian coup, and the 
launching of Sputniks I and II occupied the attention of 
the major powers. At the time of the Suez crisis, the Swiss 
Government invited the four East-West major powers and 
India to a quintipartite summit conference, which President 
Eisenhower turned down because the United Nations then 
was actively dealing with the issue. 



First Phase, November 1957 to July 1958 

On November 6, 1957 — the 40th anniversary of the Soviet 
Revolution — Khrushchev indicated in a speech that the Soviet 
Union desired "a high-level meeting" for the purpose of reach- 
ing agreements to lessen international tension. This was fol- 
lowed on December 10 by a series of letters addressed by 
Premier Bulganin to the heads of government of most of the 
countries of the world. In concluding his letter to President 
Eisenhower, the Soviet leader stated: 

Attaching great importance to personal contacts be- 
tween statesmen, which facilitate finding a common point 
of view on important international problems, we, for our 
part, would be prepared to come to an agreement on a 
personal meeting of state leaders. . . . 

Shortly thereafter the heads of government of the fifteen 
NATO powers met in Paris, December 16-19, 1957, in con- 
nection with the regular ministerial session of the NATO 
Council. This was the first such top-level NATO meeting 
and, although the principal negotiations were handled by the 




Foreign Ministers, President Eisenhower addressed the initial 
plenary session and consulted privately with the other West- 
ern heads of government. At the conclusion of the delibera- 
tions, the Council issued a declaration in which, by way of 
reply to the Soviet espousal of a summit meeting, the NATO 
powers alternatively supported an East-West ministerial con- 
ference to cope with existing critical problems, particularly 
arms limitation. 

Nevertheless, on January 12, 1958, President Eisenhower 
indicated his conditional acceptance of the Soviet proposal 
for a new summit conference. He agreed that "personal con- 
tacts can be of value," and added: 

I am ready to meet with the Soviet leaders to discuss 
the proposals mentioned in your letter and the proposals 
which I make, with the attendance as appropriate of 
leaders of other states which have recognized responsi- 
bilities in relation to one or another of the subjects we 
are to discuss. It would be essential that prior to such 
a meeting these complex matters should be worked on in 
advance through diplomatic channels and by our Foreign 
Ministers, so that the issues can be presented in form 
suitable for our decisions and so that it can be ascer- 
tained that such a top-level meeting would, in fact, hold 
good hope of advancing the cause of peace and justice 
in the world. . . . 

The Soviet Government procrastinated over the conditions 
specified in this letter. It was at this point in the White 
House-Kremlin summit correspondence — some two dozen 
communications having thus far been exchanged — that Pres- 
ident Eisenhower questioned the East-West summit written 
communications technique as a whole. Calling the most recent 
note from Bulganin (of February 1) "a slightly abbreviated 
and moderated edition" of the lengthy Minsk address of 
Khrushchev (delivered on January 22), President Eisenhower 
wrote on February 15: "I begin to wonder . . . whether we 
shall get anywhere by continuing to write speeches to each 
other? ... I cannot avoid the feeling that if our two countries 
are to move ahead to the establishment of better relations, 
we must find some ways other than mere prolongation of 
repetitive public debate." Except for Bulganin's reply of 
March 3, during the following months communications were 
exchanged at the diplomatic level rather than at the summit, 
and they dealt largely with problems of pre-summit arrange- 
ments. 

After Khrushchev replaced Bulganin as Chairman of the 
Council of Ministers on March 27, the Soviet Government 
opened a "peace offensive," and in its aide memoire on April 
1 1 to the three Western Governments, it agreed to hold talks 
with the Western Ambassadors at Moscow for the purpose of 
settling organizational details of a subsequent Foreign Min- 
isters' meeting. Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko 
insisted, however, on dealing with the three Western Ambas- 
sadors individually. 

On June 16 the Soviet Government peremptorily published 
its summit letter of June 11 (Khrushchev's first letter to 
Eisenhower), as well as a collection of hitherto confidential 
documents relating to Western agenda proposals for summit 
talks. In his reply on July 1, President Eisenhower, therefore, 
complained: 

The Soviet Government . . . has disrupted the discus- 
sions in Moscow by taking upon itself to publish with 
bare hours of warning and no attempt at consultation 
the documents exchanged between it and the Western 
Powers, including diplomatic documents originating from 
the Western Powers. This action is scarcely consonant 
with the spirit of serious preparation in which the West- 
ern Powers entered into these diplomatic exchanges. It 
cannot but cast doubt on the intentions of the Soviet Gov- 
ernment concerning the proper preparations for a sum- 
mit meeting. 



Second Phase, July to November, 1958 

In mid-July, 1958, at the time oi the nationalist revolution 
in Iraq, President I isenhowei and Prune Ministei Harold 
Macmillan decided, at the request ol the Lebanese and J<>i 
danian Governments, to dispatch troops i>> these countries, 
respectively, in order u> guarantee their security. In the con- 
text of this Middle East crisis, in a letter ol July 19 to Presi- 
dent Eisenhower, Premier Khrushchev revived the Bummit 
conference proposal by demanding the convening ol an im- 
mediate quintipartite meeting ol the heads oi government ol 
the three Western Powers, the Soviet Union, and India 
Whereas the Governments ol France and India indicated their 
approval, President Eisenhower and Prime Minister Macmillan 
countered by suggesting that the heads ol government might 
rather meet as delegates to the United Nations Security 
Council. 

Initially Khrushchev accepted President Eisenhower's sug- 
gestion and temporarily it appeared to the press as though 
a Security Council summit might be under way. In his repl) 
of July 23, however, the Soviet Premier prescribed several 
stipulations, namely, that the meeting be a "special session" 
of the Security Council, that "no resolutions whatever should 
be introduced unless they will flow from a previous agree- 
ment," that "the goal will consist in the achievement of an 
agreement" rather than "the fixing of disagreement by the 
method of voting," and that India (which had accepted the 
Kremlin's previously tendered invitation to an ad hoc Great 
Power summit) be a full participant. 

Although certain of these restrictions had initially been pro- 
posed by Prime Minister Macmillan, President Eisenhower's 
rejoinder to Khrushchev of July 25 alleged misunderstanding 
on the part of the Soviet Government, and restated the United 
States position as being that the "Charter of the United 
Nations authorizes members of government, and that of 
course includes Heads of Government and Foreign Ministers, 
to represent a member nation at the Security Council and 
that if such a meeting were generally desired, the United 
States would join in following that orderly procedure." 

After hasty consultation with the Communist Chinese 
leader, Mao Tse-tung, Chairman Khrushchev, in his letter to 
President Eisenhower of July 28, rejected the American view 
respecting a meeting of the Security Council with summit 
participants, he regarded the United States position as retro- 
gression from the earlier presumed understanding with the 
President, and he therefore reverted to his original demand for 
a Five Power summit, including India. 

During this series of exchanges — concerned with the matter 
of deciding upon an acceptable diplomatic forum for consid- 
ering the Middle East situation — President Eisenhower grew 
somewhat impatient. In his letter of August 1, he wrote: "1 
consider it quite inaccurate for you ... to convey the impres- 
sion that the Government of the United States has embarked on 
a policy of delay based on niggling procedural argument. . . ." 

Confronted with opposition to having India join the Big 
Four at the summit, four days later Khrushchev suggested, 
as an alternative, that a special session of the General Assem- 
bly be convoked. He declared that such action "could be a 
good step towards the relaxation of tension and would prepare 
the ground for the speeding of a meeting at the summit." On 
that same day President Eisenhower accepted this alternative 
for dealing with the Middle East problem. During the ensuing 
months progress along the road to the summit remained at 
a standstill. 



September-October, 1961 



11 



Third Phase, November 1958 to August 1959 

It was not until late 1958 that Premier Khrushchev launched 
the final phase leading to the Paris Conference of 1960. On 
November 10. in a speech at Moscow, spelled out in greater 
detail in Soviet notes to the United States, the United Kingdom, 
and France on November 27, he issued an "ultimatum" to 
the effect that the time had arrived to terminate the four- 
power occupation regime in Berlin and to conclude a peace 
treaty with Germany. He added that if this was not done 
within six months, the Soviet Government would enter into 
direct negotiations with the East German Democratic Republic 
to relinquish Soviet responsibilities in East Germany. 

The Western reaction was immediate. In a communique 
issued by the four major Western Powers at the end of the 
annual NATO Council meeting, they expressed their deter- 
mination that Western rights in Berlin had to be maintained, 
and this position was endorsed on December 16 by the fifteen 
member governments of NATO. Similar views were expressed 
in the official Western replies of December 31 to the Soviet 
notes, in the course of which the United States informed the 
Soviet Government that it would be willing "to discuss the 
question of Berlin in the wider framework of negotiations for 
a solution of the German problem as well as that of European 
security." 

In ensuing negotiations, following consultation with London, 
Paris, and Bonn, the United States indicated, in a note of 
February 16, 1959, to the Soviet Union that it was prepared 
"to participate in a conference of the Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs" of the Big Four, "and is ready to consider any sug- 
gestions as to a date and place, which would be fixed by 
mutual agreement." The Soviet response of March 2 declared 
that, in its opinion, it would be better to hold the meeting 
at the summit. It stated: 

The Soviet Government adheres to the opinion that a 
meeting at the highest level has at the present time the 
greatest chances of achieving positive results. Such 
authoritative statesmen as the Heads of Government, 
who possess very great plenary powers and experience, 
must have their say in order to give a new direction to 
the development of relations among states. After achiev- 
ing agreement among themselves on vital international 
questions, the Heads of Government would be able then 
to instruct the Ministers of Foreign Affairs to work out 
future measures for the realization of the joint decisions 
adopted. 

The Soviet Government conceded, however, that, if the 
Governments of the Western powers "are not yet ready to 
take part in a summit conference," then the Soviet Govern- 
ment was prepared to meet with them at the ministerial level. 
Consequently, on March 26, in a note to the Soviet Gov- 
ernment, the United States agreed to the convening of a 
Big Four Foreign Minister's conference at Geneva. It added: 

. . . The purpose of the Foreign Ministers meeting should 
be to reach positive agreements over as wide a field as 
possible, and in any case to narrow the differences be- 
tween the respective points of view and to prepare con- 
structive proposals for consideration by a conference 
of Heads of Government later in the summer. On this 
understanding and as soon as developments in the For- 
eign Ministers meeting justify holding a summit confer- 
ence, the United States Government would be ready to 
participate in such a conference. The date, place, and 
agenda for such a conference would be proposed by the 
meeting of Foreign Ministers. 

In accordance with these determinations, the Foreign Min- 
isters met in two series of sessions, the first from May 1 1 to 
June 20, and the second from July 13 to August 5, 1959. 
Nevertheless, they failed to achieve any significant settle- 
ment. When the second phase recessed in August, the date 



and place of the future resumption of work at the ministerial 
level was left to be settled through diplomatic channels. 
Secretary Christian A. Herter succinctly described the con- 
ference as follows: "Nine weeks of negotiation at the Foreign 
Ministers Conference in Geneva have ended in a recess." 

Summit Personal Visits Preluding 
the Summit Conference of 1960 

In the meantime, Prime Minister Macmillan undertook 
an official visit to Moscow from February 21 to March 3, 
1959, at the invitation of the Soviet Government. This 
launched a whole series of such visits among the principal 
leaders of the major powers as a prelude to the forthcoming 
summit conference. On August 3, 1959, two days before the 
close of the second phase of the Foreign Ministers' meeting, 
Washington and Moscow jointly announced a projected ex- 
change of visits by President Eisenhower and Chairman 
Khrushchev. 

In January, 1959, Anastas I. Mikoyan, First Deputy Chair- 
man of the Council of Ministers of the Soviet Union, had 
made an unofficial visit to the United States, ostensibly as 
the guest of the Soviet Ambassador in Washington. Some 
months later, in June, First Deputy Chairman Frol R. Kozlov 
came to open the Soviet Exhibition in New York and to visit 
other parts of the United States. In July-August, Vice Presi- 
dent Richard M. Nixon opened the American Exhibit at 
Moscow and visited various parts of the Soviet Union and 
Warsaw. 

President Eisenhower travelled to Europe, August 26- 
September 7, 1959, to consult personally and individually 
with the leaders of the Big Four Western European powers — 
the United Kingdom, France, Italy, and West Germany. He 
was warmly received in the capitals of West Germany, France, 
and the United Kingdom, where he discussed the projected 
exchange of visits with Khrushchev. 

Toward the end of his visit to the United States (Septem- 
ber 15-27, 1959), the Soviet Premier conferred with President 
Eisenhower at Camp David. The most important outcome of 
their talks, according to the Department of State, "were agree- 
ments (1) that all outstanding international questions should 
be settled not by the application of force but by peaceful 
means through negotiation, and (2) that the negotiations on 
Berlin would be reopened and that, while they were not to 
be prolonged indefinitely, no time limit ['ultimatum' j would 
be placed upon them." An important intangible gain from 
the Camp David talks was the establishment of a closer per- 
sonal contact between President Eisenhower and Chairman 
Khrushchev, inducing the President to indicate at his press 
conference on September 28 that, as far as he personally was 
concerned, the talks had removed many of the objections 
he had previously held to the holding of an East-West summit 
conference. 

At a Western summit — held in Paris, December 19-21, 
1959 — comprised of the heads of government of the United 
States, the United Kingdom, France, and West Germany, an 
agreement was reached on the desirability of convening a 
new East-West summit conference. The final communique, 
issued on the last day of the meeting, stated that President 
Eisenhower, Prime Minister Macmillan, and President de 
Gaulle had sent letters to Chairman Khrushchev proposing 
the holding of such a meeting in Paris the following Spring. 
President Eisenhower's communication of December 21 stated 
that the Western leaders were agreed that "it would be desir- 
able for the four Heads of State or Government to meet 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



together from time to time in eaeh other's countries to discus. 
the main problems affecting the attainment of peace and sta- 
bility in the world." He then went on to express his readiness 
to meet personally with the other leaders "at the earliest 
feasible time." Chairman Khrushchev replied on Christmas 
Day, accepting the invitation, and the convening date of the 
East-West summit conference was fixed for May 16, l ( >6(). 

In the meantime, the bipartite and direct consultation ol 
the major leaders continued as an immediate prelude to the 
Paris summit conference. Thus, Prime Minister Macmillan 
visited Washington, March 26-30, I960, to consult informalh 
with President Eisenhower. Khrushchev paid an official visit 
to France early in the year, so that the Soviet leader had 
engaged in face-to-face private talks with all three oi the 
heads of government of the participating Western powers. 
Moreover, at the invitation of Queen Elizabeth, President de 
Gaulle visited London. April 5-8, at which time he was 
able to consult personally with the British Prime Minister 
and, at the invitation of the United States Government, he 
came to Washington, April 22-29. Finally, President Eisen- 
hower was scheduled to visit Moscow in June, shortly after 
the conclusion of the Paris summit gathering. 




The Abortive Paris Summit, May, 1960 

The summit conference was scheduled to convene on 
Monday, May 16. Premier Khrushchev arrived on Saturday, 
the 14th, one day earlier than planned. The following day 
he paid a call on President de Gaulle and left a memorandum 
setting forth the conditions which he claimed would have to 
be met by the United States — because of the U-2 incident of 
May 1 — before the Soviet Union .vould participate with the 
United States in the conference. These conditions were re- 
peated by Khrushchev to Prime Minister Macmillan that same 
afternoon. They were that the United States discontinue its 
overflights, that it promise not to repeat such flights, and that 
it punish those responsible for them. 

Thus it was that the heads of government met the following 
morning, as originally scheduled, at which time Premier 
Khrushchev read a formal statement largely condemning the 
United States overflights as a violation of Soviet sovereignty, 
stipulating that the Soviet Government was not prepared to 
negotiate under the threat of continued American overflights, 
and reiterating the Soviet conditions for proceeding with the 
conference. Among other things, he said: 



Now, al .i time when the leaden ol the Governments 
ol the foui powers are arriving in Paris to take pari in 
the conference, the question arises ol how is it possible 
productively to negotiate and examine the questions con 
fronting the conference when the ' nited States Govern 
menl and the President himsell have not only failed to 
condemn this provocative act the intrusion ol the 
American military aircraft into the Soviet Union but, 
on the contrary, have declared that such actions will 
continue to be state policy ol the I S v with regard to 

the Soviet Union. 
He added that it would be better il the summit were post- 
poned for sin to eight months, and that in the circumstances 
it would not he possible lor President 1 isenhower to undertake 

his proposed visit to the Soviet Union. 

In his rejoinder, President Eisenhower gave Premier 
Khrushchev a number ol assurances respecting the discon- 
tinuance ol American overflights, and. in his public statement 
immediately following the meeting, he reported: 

... 1 gave most careful thought as to how this matter 
should best be handled. Having in mind the great im- 
portance o\ this Conference and the hopes that the peoples 
ol all the world have reposed in this meeting. I con- 
cluded that in the circumstances it was best to see it 
at todav's private meeting any possibility existed through 
the exercise of reason and restraint to dispose of this 
matter of the overflights, which would have permitted 
the Conference to go forward. 

I was under no illusion as to the probability of success 
of any such approach but I felt that in view of the great 
responsibility resting on me as President of the United 
States, this effort should be made. 

At the conference session Prime Minister Macmillan 
pointed out that, in view of President Eisenhower's assurance. 
there was no kind of "threat" overhanging the negotiations, 
and he urged "that the Summit meeting, so long awaited by 
the world, should proceed with its work." Nevertheless, the 
session adjourned without dealing with the substantive issues 
on the agenda. Premier Khrushchev regarded this May 16 
session as preliminary to the convening of the summit confer- 
ence, and he refused to attend the session on the following 
day, insisting that his preconditions be met by President 
Eisenhower before the conference technically could properly 
convene. However, the Western heads of government met 
on the 17th, and, although they waited in vain for the Soviet 
Premier to make an appearance, eventually they issued a 
tripartite communique, which concluded with these words: 
. . . For their part, they remain unshaken in their con- 
viction that all outstanding international questions should 
be settled not by the use or threat of force but by peace- 
ful means through negotiations. They themselves remain 
ready to take part in such negotiations at any suitable 
time in the future. 

Returning from the conference, on arrival at Andrews Field 
in Washington, May 20, President Eisenhower stated: 

As we planned for the Summit, the hopes of the world 
were not too high. The experience of the past years had 
denied us any right to believe that great advances toward 
the purpose we seek — peace with justice — could be 
achieved in any great measure. Yet, it seems that the 
identity of interest between ourselves and the Soviets 
in certain features was so obvious that logically we should 
have made some progress. 
Subsequently he repeated his oft-made pledge that he would 
go anywhere at any time to negotiate in the cause of peace. 
Reporting on its investigation concerning the Paris Summit 
Conference, the Foreign Relations Committee of the United 
States Senate concluded as follows: 

. . . The U-2 incident therefore was the immediate excuse 
seized upon for not proceeding with the conference. 

This is not to say that the summit conference would 
have been a success if the U-2 incident had not occurred. 
It is to say simply that there probably would have been 



September-October, 1961 



13 



a summit conference. No one can say what would have 
happened at the conference if it had been held. At best, 
it would have perhaps made some slight progress on 
disarmament and nuclear testing, temporized on Berlin, 
and set a pattern for future summits. At worst, it would 
have resulted in complete deadlock. If it was in fact 
Khrushchev's purpose to prevent the summit, then if 
the U-2 incident had not occurred, he would have had 
to find other means to do so. In this sense, the U-2 



incident made his task easier. On the other hand, the 
circumstances under which the conference would have 
been aborted in the absence of the U-2 — if it would have 
been — are unknown. They might have been more favor- 
able to the West or less favorable. But the crucial point 
here is that it is by no means certain what the outcome 
of the conference would have been, as a matter of 
deliberate Soviet policy, if the U-2 incident had not 
occurred. 




The Future 



While East-West negotiations suffered a serious reversal 
by the developments attending the Paris Summit Conference, 
the door was not closed entirely by any of the participating 
governments. On his return journey, Premier Khrushchev 
stopped off in East Berlin, where in a public address he 
indicated that the Soviet Government would defer decisions 
respecting the questions of Berlin and a separate East German 
peace treaty until after the American election and the 
inauguration of the new President, and in coming to New 
York to attend the fifteenth session of the United Nations 
General Assembly in September, 1960, he intimated that he 
was available for private and personal consultation with other 
leaders to seek a solution to the impasse. Moreover, his 
messages of congratulation and good wishes to John F. 
Kennedy upon his election in November, on New Year's 
Day, and upon his inauguration in January have been inter- 
preted, with respect to both substance and tone, as seeking 
to resume personal diplomacy at the summit. 

In the presidential campaign, the candidates were pressed 
in their fourth T-V debate, October 21, to give their views 
respecting the future of summitry. Both expressed consider- 
able reservation respecting an East-West Conference and 
specified a number of pre-conditions which would have to be 
met. Kennedy stressed the need of a previously agreed agenda 
and some reasonable assurance that such negotiations could 



achieve a "meeting of minds." He also insisted that the 
United States must first increase its international strength to 
improve its negotiation posture. 

A few days after the inauguration, the Kennedy Adminis- 
tration let it be known that it is its intention "to use freely 
the [traditional] diplomatic channel for informal as well as 
formal discussions and consultations with other governments. 
The value of the diplomatic channel depends on its privacy." 
While the emphasis was on the need for greater "quiet diplo- 
macy," the position of the new President was generally re- 
garded as implying reluctance to return to the summit, and, 
in his press conferences, and other statements, he has avoided 
commitments regarding future involvement in personal presi- 
dential diplomacy. 

The major issues in United States-Soviet relations — the 
Berlin crisis, the treaty with Germany, the nuclear test ban, 
and general disarmament and others — appear to be pressing 
the President to return to the summit. The choice may not 
lie entirely with the President, and that the eschewal of sum- 
mitry actually may be as difficult as is the proceeding to an 
East-West summit conference. The specter of this dilemma 
hangs heavy upon the young Kennedy Administration and 
can scarcely be wished away. Only history will be able to 
judge the wisdom of the grave decisions that will have to 
be made. 



14 



the Maryland Magazine 



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The Prisoner at Shark's Island 



Dr. Verne E. Chatelain 
Department of History 



ALONG FORGOTTEN LETTER, WRIT- 
ten by Dr. Samuel A. Mudd from 
his prison cell in notorious Fort Jefferson 
on Shark's Island, to Frederick Stone, 
one of the attorneys for the defense in 
the trial of the conspirators in the 
assassination plot resulting in the death 
of Abraham Lincoln, has recently been 
made available to the Library of the 
University of Maryland. The letter, 



dated December 4, 1867, constitutes an 
excellent statement of Dr. Mudd's rela- 
tionship to the strange affair, which to 
this day presents elements of mystery 
and uncertainty, baffling to all students 
of history. 1 

It is, of course, well known to read- 
ers of Maryland historical lore that Dr. 
Mudd, a native of Charles County, was 
descended from one of the early and 



distinguished families of this State; and 
that he. like the Surratts of nearby 
Surrattsville (Clintonvillc) . whom he 
knew — just as he knew many others of 
the old families of St. Mary's. Charles, 
and Prince George's counties — was 
warmly sympathetic to the Southern 
cause. Admittedly, a large majority of 
the people of his region were avowed 
Southerners, though not necessarilv 



September-October, 1961 



15 



"secessionists." Their plantation life, 
their slave-holding affiliations and their 
traditional cultural patterns were all 
similar to their neighbors in the further 
south. 

It is also a fact that Dr. Mudd's 
county, and others in his part of Mary- 
land, had been treated constantly during 
the war a century ago like Southern 
Rebel strongholds. Not only did the 
population suffer from Federal occupa- 
tion troops, who were continually har- 
rassing the countryside, but many of 
the male citizens, on one pretext or 
another, had been carried off to prisons, 
jails, and camps without formal hear- 
ings and trials, under the practices that 
followed suspension of the writ of 
habeas corpus. 

The midnight knock upon the door, 
and the command to open up and let 
in unwelcome bluecoats, who might 
carry off anything that struck their 
fancy — farm produce, slaves, or the 
master of the house — was an all too 
familiar occurrence in this area; and 
the result was as might be expected: 
bitterness, hatred, and rebellion against 
the Washington government. That these 
things were justified as inevitable conse- 
quences of Maryland's close proximity 
to the National Capital and the neces- 
sity of controlling the life lines to the 
seat of Federal government may appear 
logical to those who believe that, in 
time of national peril, the ends justify 
the means. To that generation, however, 
actions of the Federal government 
oftentimes appeared to be harsh, cruel 
and inexcusable. Thus counter-measures, 
when they were adopted, tended like- 
wise to reflect much the same attitude 
and lack of restraint. 

Very few there were, indeed, in these 
southern counties of the State, who were 
not aware of plans for resistance to 
the Federal authority, even if they were 
not — as was frequently the case — actual 
participants. In a countryside aroused 
and angered by indignities, and tactless 
and often illegal acts of force and vio- 
lence, under the guise of military neces- 
sity, it was natural that Dr. Mudd, an 
honest and sincere country doctor, 
should seek to keep out of trouble, if 
it was possible to do so, but under no 
circumstances to avoid his responsibili- 
ties to his neighbors. 

The evidence appears to support the 
belief that Dr. Mudd, from the time of 
return to his beloved Charles County 
after a period of training in the Balti- 
more Medical College, set about in con- 
scientious, if perhaps unspectacular, 
fashion to perform the many duties in- 
volved in the life of a country doctor. 



That he was never particularly prosper- 
ous is attested to by the fact that he 
was forced to resort to some farming 
to supplement his income. His little 
farm home, a short distance from Bry- 
antown, still standing, is a simple un- 
pretentious place. He traded for house- 
hold necessities at a picturesque country 
store approximately one mile from his 
farm; it, too, is still there, and doing 
business. Ancient records of the store 
show the items that Dr. Mudd bought 
from time to time, even after his return 
from prison. His life was relatively un- 
eventful, despite the war, until that 
fateful day, when John Wilkes Booth, 
in 1864, and some months before the 
assassination, came to Bryantown. 

It was apparently at a church service 
in Bryantown that Booth was introduced 
to Samuel Mudd. A mutual friend 
brought them together. Booth was seek- 
ing to buy a saddle horse, and the 
friend thought that Mudd possibly 
might be able to supply such an animal. 
Mudd could not; but he did talk with 
Booth, whose reputation as an actor 
was well known in Baltimore and 
Washington. The war was still on, and 
horses were scarce, especially in Charles 
County, where the blue coats went for- 
aging. Booth, however, did make a 
purchase from a farm not far from 
Mudd's. There is no clear evidence that 
the men saw each other again until 
the tragic night after the slaying of the 
President at the Ford Theatre. Mudd, 
it is true, was in Washington, subsequent 
to Booth's visit to Bryantown; the pros- 
ecution made much of that point, claim- 
ing that his trip had direct bearing 
upon the plot itself, and that he (Mudd) 
was one of the conspiratorial gang. 



^UCH AN ALLEGATION DOES NOT Ap- 
pear very convincing, first, because 
Charles countians frequently made the 
trip to the City of Washington. In this 
respect, Mudd was like many others, 
who came and went; and there is no 
direct evidence that he saw Booth, while 
in Washington, or that he would have 
been on such a basis of friendship with 
Booth as to seek him out, after a casual 
meeting in Bryantown. A second point, 
much more germane in the matter of 
any guilt in the case of Dr. Mudd, is 
the fact that Booth's night trip after 
the shooting of the President, while it 
led south into Charles County, would in 
all probability not have been in the 
direction of Dr. Mudd's place at all, had 
the actor not had the misfortune to 
have sustained a broken leg in his effort 
to escape from the theatre box. In the 



emergency, he needed medical care and 
he recalled that the doctor lived in a 
spot close to his escape route; and so 
he went to the Mudd farm. 

Dr. Mudd, in these circumstances, 
probably did what any country doctor 
would have done. When he was called 
to the door in the middle of the night 
by two men, one of whom was clearly 
in great pain from a broken leg, he 
admitted them and did what he could 
in his professional capacity to make 
Booth, as well as his companion, com- 
fortable. Realizing that the patient need- 
ed rest, he invited both men to tarry 
for a few hours. They accepted his offer 
and stayed at the farm until the next 
day was well along. Then they rode off, 
presumably without explanation as to 
why they were traveling in his vicinity, 
or, for that matter, as to why they were 
in a hurry to be again on their way. 
There is no direct evidence that either 
man discussed with the doctor what had 
happened in Washington the preceding 
evening. 

To be sure, if Mudd, as the prosecu- 
tion claimed, was actually one of the 
conspirators and was acquainted with 
all of those who, at one time or another, 
appeared at the Surratt boarding house 
on H Street, then it is likely that Booth 
and Herold revealed to the Charles 
County doctor what had transpired in 
Washington and why they were fleeing 
for their lives. This Mudd categorically 
denied, just as he denied all knowledge 
of the plot, and of the crime. In fact, 
he refused to admit even that he recog- 
nized Booth, either at the time he treat- 
ed his leg, or, for that matter, at any 
time during his stay at the farm. This 
position, of course, is not very plausi- 
ble; and his lack of candor and failure 
to confess that he recognized his patient 
— clumsy and untruthful as it appears 
to be — very seriously impaired the 
credibility of his entire story with the 
court. 

This is a case, apparently, where one 
palpable and damaging falsehood served 
to cast doubt on what, otherwise, is an 
altogether straightforward and sincere 
position in this strange matter. The best 
that can be said in Mudd's defense is 
that he panicked, when he came to 
realize the awful predicament in which, 
willy-nilly, he found himself. Public 
opinion was inflamed, and Mudd must 
have appreciated his danger of becom- 
ing a scapegoat. A clear, truthful state- 
ment of the facts of his obviously casual 
association with Booth, as well as with 
the Surratts, might not, in the circum- 
stances, have saved him. Yet it could 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 



hardly have hurt him more than the 
story he told at the trial. 

The significance of Mudd's letter to 
Frederick Stone, in this connection, 
composed, as it was, many months after 
this country doctor had been convicted 
of complicity in the crime, and had 
been sentenced to life imprisonment, 
lies in the fact that it is probably an 
entirely candid and truthful statement 
of his relationship to all concerned and 
fairly conclusive as to his complete in- 
nocence. The letter consists of two 
parts: the first, which is introductory, 
explains to Stone, himself a citizen of 
Charles County and a man held in high 
esteem by Dr. Mudd, why he has under- 
taken, despite some uncertainties as to 
the advisability of so doing, to write 
at this time in his defense. It seemed 
that he had virtually been forced to do 
so "by Genl. Butler, Chairman of the 
Committee appointed to investigate 
matters." Butler had sent a notary pub- 
lic, William H. Gleason, to take depo- 
sitions from Arnold and Spangler (who 
were also alleged conspirators in the 
assassination plot), as well as from 
Mudd. The doctor, reluctant to talk 
without advice of attorney, feared a 
diet of bread and water in solitary, if 
he failed to make a statement under 
oath. 



The second part of the letter is a 
copy of the deposition, as he had given 
it to Gleason. Dr. Mudd stated his ease, 
as follows: 

"1st. I never heard at any time during 
the war or since, a desire expressed 
favorable to the assassination of the 
President. 

"2nd. I never had the least knowledge 
or suspicion, that the murder of the 
President was contemplated by any in- 
dividual or band of men previous to the 
commission of the horrid deed. 

"3rd. I was not acquainted with Mrs. 
Surratt and to the best of my knowledge 
never in her company. 

"4th. I knew Booth and Surratt, but 
not intimately. 

"5th. I did not know either Arnold, 
O'Loughlin, Spangler, Payne alias Pow- 
ell, Herold or Atzerot, and never heard 
their names mentioned in any connec- 
tion whatever previous to the assassina- 
tion." 

Mudd concluded his letter to Stone 
with a request that he be remembered 
to "sympathizing friends." Then he add- 
ed: "You can state whether there is any 
hopes of an early release."- 

If fate had, in this queer fashion, 
dealt a cruel and unjust punishment 







"7 



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upon an innocent and blameless victim) 
.is nou appears to be the case, thai tame 

fate upon .mother occasion not man) 
months later was to open the prison 

doors to the doctor from ( barlet 
( ounty. A malaria] and yellow lever 

scourge, whicfa swept through I ort Jcf- 
lerson and claimed many li\es. afford- 
ed Mudd the opportunity to displaj the 

Strength Ol character ami heroism that 

were to make him finally something of 

a national celebrity. For his quiet and 

effective work in ending the epidemic, 

President Johnson issued him a pardon; 
and. at long last, Mudd thus was per- 
mitted to return home, there to pick 
up the broken threads and to h\e the 
remainder of his days with his family 
and neighbors in peace and obscurity. 

This would seem to be the end of 
the story, but such is not quite the 
case. A pardon, even though it be issued 
by a President of the United States, 
does not constitute an admission of 
error in so far as the alleged crime is 
concerned. The conviction still stands; 
and the pardon merely means that so- 
ciety has forgiven the guilty one. 

Not many are aware, perhaps, that 
on March 11. 1961, the United States 
took a final, if somewhat tardy, step 
to clear its record in the case of Samuel 
A. Mudd.' 1 Under authorization of the 
Congress, on that day a plaque was ded- 
icated in fitting ceremonies at Key West. 
Florida, to the memory of a man who 
had once been branded as one of the 
Nation's most despised criminals, a 
virtual admission of an unjust convic- 
tion. 



NOTES 

1. The letter was furnished to the author 
of this article and for the use of the Library 
of the University of Maryland by Miss 
Louise Matthews, of LaPlata, granddaugh- 
ter of the Honorable Frederick Stone (a 
one-time member of the House of Repre- 
sentatives of the Congress of the United 
States from Maryland). The letter has 
been in the possession of the family since 
it was received in 1867. 

2. A good deal of the story relating to 
Dr. Mudd is contined in Theodore Roscoe's 
The Web of Conspiracy, including the 
doctor's statement of April 21, 1865, which 
was used against him at the trial. A biog- 
raphy by Nettie Mudd. The Life of Dr. 
Samuel A. Mudd. contains useful material, 
but is lacking in objectivity. 

3. An Associated Press news feature 
writer, Jules Loh. has written an account 
of the dedication of the plaque at Key 
West. The plaque, itself, actually has been 
placed at Fort Jefferson, now a National 
Monument, administered by the National 
Park Service. Loh"s article was carried in 
the Washington Sunday Star. March 12. 
1961. In a certain sense. Fort Jefferson 
itself is a national memorial featuring 
chiefly the story of Dr. Mudd. The Fort, 
in the Dry Tortugas. is approximately 90 
miles from Key West. 



r-' 



■ 



17 




Reftoration 
Comedy: 

Being a Brief Sf True Ac- 
count of the Adventures of 
David Carter Penciblt, Efq. 
in King/burg, Virginia, dur- 
ing National Reftoration 
Week in May. 

By a Gentleman o/"Virgini a. 



Remove not the antient Land-Mark, 
which thy Fathers have Jet. 

— Prov. 22:28. 



RICHMOND: 

Printed by The Dietz Prefs, 

And to be Had of All Book-Sellers. 

MCM.LXI. 




B7B.R.JERMAN 



Scholarly Productioi 



THE PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE COVERS OF BOOKS SHOWN 
on this page are a sampling of what faculty members 
at the College Park campus are producting in the 
way of books and other published materials. 
If we take a look at the publications shown for 1959/60 
(the 1960/61 list will not be ready until fall), we estimate 
that 41 books have been published; 571 articles have appeared 
in journals, proceedings, etc.; at least 18 papers have been 
presented to scholarly groups; 12 members have written for 
encyclopedias; eight have written testimony for Congressional 
hearings; 17 have done book reviews; seven have contributed 
parts of books; three have done bibliographic work; one 
member published four songs, one song story, and four 
piano pieces; and at least 19 books are in progress. 

English Professor Alfred Aldridge's Man of Reason was 
issued in a British edition in London. Dr. Carl Bode's The 
Great Experiment in American Literature, a volume of lec- 
tures edited by him, was also published in London. 

The Young Disraeli, one of fifty books chosen for an ex- 
hibit at the Library of Congress, was written by B. R. Jermen, 
Associate Professor of English. The exhibit was shown on the 



second floor gallery of the Library of Congress this summer. 

The National Council of Teachers of English announced 
the publication of its College and Adult Reading List of 
Books in Literature and Fine Arts. Included in the list of 
contents and contributors is Chamber and Keyboard Music 
by Dr. Homer Ulrich, Head, Department of Music. 

Among the latest books to be pulished is one written by 
Dr. Thornton Anderson of the Government and Politics De- 
partment. Titled Development of American Political Thought, 
it was written over a two-year period. Dr. Anderson says, 
"The book is designed as a text for courses in American po- 
litical thought, and was designed to be used at the college 
level." The text itself is a complete revision of a former 
edition done by the late J. Mark Jacobson of the University 
of Wisconsin. The materials, says Dr. Anderson, come as 
close to the current scene as possible and include many living 
writers, such as Walter Lippmann. 

Two other members of the Government and Politics De- 
partment have also published books recently. Dr. Elmer 
Plischke's book Conduct of American Diplomacy was re- 
viewed in the May-June, 1961, issue of The Maryland 



18 



the Maryland Magazine 




IJacobson's 

DEVELOPMENT of 
AMERICAN 

IPOLITICAL thought 



1 



HATHORN-PENNIMAN-ZINK 




GOVERNMENT 
AND POLITICS 
UNITED 
WES 



J. i J 



VAN NO» 



'RAND POLITICAL SC'CHCC 5IR'I» 



oy Faculty Authors 



Magazine, and he also has published a book on Contempo- 
rary Government of Germany. Dr. Guy B. Hathorn's book, 
Government and Politics in the United States, has been re- 
leased recently. The book presents a broad picture of all 
levels of American government and fully covers such gov- 
ernment developments as the 1960 campaign and election, 
the Supreme Court decisions and the ratification of the 
Twenty-third Amendment in 1961. Dr. Hathorn collaborated 
with Howard R. Penniman and Harold Zink. Dr. Penniman 
is Chairman of the Government Department at Georgetown 
University; Dr. Zink is Professor of Political Science at Ohio 
State University. Dr. Hathorn collaborated previously with 
Professors Zink and Penniman in a work called American 
Government and Politics. 

The History Department Faculty, whose publications are 
included in the Arts and Sciences College count, also has had 
recent book publications: Dr. Fred W. Wellborn's Diplo- 
matic History of the United States; Dr. E. James Ferguson's 
Power of the Purse: a History of American Public Finance, 
1776-1790; and Dr. Helen Riviln's The Agricultural Policy 
of Muhammed Ali in Egypt. 



In the English Department, Dr. Robert Manson Myers 

has published a satire, Restoration Comedy: being a Brief and 
True Account of the Adventures of David Carter Pencihle. 
Esq. in Kingshurg, Virginia, during National Restoration 
Week in May, by a Gentleman of Virginia. 

Compilation of a bibliography of Faculty publications is 
being undertaken by the staff of the Maryland and Rare Books 
Department for publication in early 1962 in the Library 
News. 

Copies of reprints of articles, etc., are sought b\ the library, 
and when received are kept in the Maryland and Rare Books 
Department. There, an author card is made and a catalog 
of these reprints of Faculty publications is available. I he 
reprints, kept in the locked stacks, are available for use under 
supervision. In the last year an increase in requests lor the 
reprints was noted by the Department. 

During the year there are displays of faculty books at the 
Library. During the 1961 National Library Week, eight 
display cases were used to exhibit faculty publications. 

At present, the Library does not have the Baltimore list- 
ings, but hopes to have it for the list to be published. 



September-October, 196 J 



19 



College of 
AGRICULTURE 

A. B. Hamilton 



Personal Notes 

Noble P. Wong, '53, received his Ph.D. 
from the Pennsylvania State University. 

Col. S. L. Crosthwait, '33, retired 
after 38 years of military association. 

Barry M. Bryce, '60, is a Plant Quar- 
antine Inspector in New York with the 
Plant Quarantine Division of the Agri- 
cultural Research Service of the United 
States Department. 

Louis G. Foye, '52, has established 
himself in a new field. In addition to 
his first love, horses, he has become in- 
terested in printing. He is the agent for 
Josten's who specialize in college an- 
nouncements, yearbooks, awards and 
diplomas. He is located at Norristown, 
Pennsylvania. 

Grafton Osborn, '42, has joined The 
Equitable Life Assurance Society as a 
farm loan appraiser. His territory in- 
cludes the states of Maryland and Dela- 
ware. Previously he was with the Pro- 
duction Credit Association. 

Amos R. Meyer, marketing specialist 
in the Department of Markets, at the 
University of Maryland, was honored 
with a Life Membership in the Mary- 
land Beef Cattle Producers Association. 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Staff of the College 



Woodrow Wilson Fellowship 

Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Awards 
have been awarded to Miss Frances M. 
Rohland, English Department, and Mrs. 
Sybil A. Rappoport Moses, History 
Department. 

Miss Rohland is working toward a 
Master of Art degree at the University 
of Chicago. And Mrs. Moses is work- 
ing toward a Master of Art degree at 
the University of Pennsylvania. 



Dr. Carl Bode 

Professor Carl Bode of the Department 
of English presided at the annual Con- 
vention of the Thoreau Society in Con- 
cord, Massachusetts, on July 15. As 
President of the Society for 1960-61, 
Professor Bode delivered a paper on 
"The Sound of American Literature a 
Century Ago." Professor Bode is the 
editor of Thoreau's Letters and other 
works of Thoreau. 



Dr. A. E. Zucker Retires 

Dr. Adolf E. Zucker, Professor of Ger- 
man and Comparative Literature and 
Head of the Department of Foreign 
Languages, has retired. Dr. Zucker has 
brought distinction to the University by 
building up its language department, 
and by his own wide scholarship and 
international reputation. 

A native of Fort Wayne, Indiana, Dr. 
Zucker acquired his A.B. at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois in 1912, his M.A. 
there in 1913, and his Ph.D. at the 
University of Pennsylvania in 1917. 

The story of his connection with 
Maryland starts in China. From 1918- 
23 he was Assistant Professor of English 
and Head of the Language Department 
at Pekin Union Medical College. Mrs. 
Lois Zucker, who worked in the Amer- 
ican Embassy at Pekin, introduced her 
husband to the U. S. Commercial At- 
tache, Dean Frederic Lee. Dean Lee, 
who was eager to build up Maryland's 
Humanities Division, prevailed on Dr. 
Zucker to come to the University of 
Maryland to head up its Language De- 
partment. After traveling around the 
world, Dr. Zucker became in 1923 Pro- 
fessor of German and Head of the De- 
partment of Foreign Languages at Col- 
lege Park. 

He found a department of three 
teachers of French, German and Span- 
ish housed in old Morrill Hall. A. C. 



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the Maryland Magazine 



Parsons, now Professor, was then a 
student. From 1935-37, Dr. Zucker 
taught at the University of North Caro- 
lina, in 1937-38 at the University ol In- 
diana. He then returned to Maryland 
where he assumed the Chairmanship 
of the Division of the Humanities, 1938. 
Under his direction, the Department 
has expanded greatly. Besides French, 
German, and Spanish, Hebrew, Russian. 
Chinese, Italian and Comparative Lit- 
erature are now taught. Dr. Zucker's 
teaching specialties include undergrad- 
uate and graduate courses and seminars 
in German literature, comparative liter- 
ature, and Bible. 

His scholarship covers a wide range 
of fields. His best-known books include 
a History of the Chinese Theatre, Ibsen 
the Master Builder, Redentin Easter 
Flaw Zeugnisse Deutscher Freiheit 
(published in Stuttgart-Berlin), and a 
textbook, Amerika unci Deutschland. He 
edited The Forty-Eighters. 

Since 1941 Dr. Zucker has been Di- 
rector of Research of the Carl Schurz 
Memorial Foundation. In 1945-6 he 
went to Berlin for the Armed Services, 
as a Specialist in the Education Branch, 
OMGUS. He was awarded a Fulbright 
professorial scholarship in 1951 to study 
in Vienna, where his project was the 
history of the theatre. Dr. Zucker has 
been particularly active in the Society 
for the History of the Germans in 
Maryland, the Goethe Society, and the 
Modern Language Association. He is 
also a member of the Society for the 
Advancement of Scandinavian Studies, 
and the AAUP. 

After Commencement, Dr. Zucker 
plans to travel to France, in connection 
with research on the biography of Baron 
Jean de Kalb, an associate of La Fayette 
who became a Major General in the 
army of the American Revolution. 
Friends of Dr. Zucker anticipate that 
this book will be the best of his brain 
children. 

Dr. Zucker's family includes his wife, 
Dr. Lois Miles Zucker, his son John, a 
lawyer, one grand-daughter, and three 
sisters. His home and beautiful garden 
are well known by the generations of 
Marylanders who during the thirty-eight 
years of his association with the Uni- 
versity have been received there with 
gracious hospitality. 

Dr. Douglas W. Alden, formerly As- 
sociate Professor of French at Princeton 
University, has been appointed Head of 
the Department, succeeding Professor 
Zucker. Professor Alden, who has just 
returned from a semester of research 
in France, took up his duties at Mary- 
land in September. 

The new head of department was 
born in Washington, D. C, in 1912. He 
received his A.B. from Dartmouth Col- 






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99 



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lege in 1933, having spent his junior 
year in Paris under the auspices of the 
University of Delaware. He received 
his doctor's degree from Brown Uni- 
versity in 1938, after another year spent 
at the University of Paris. After short 
periods of teaching at Texas Techno- 
logical College and at Amherst, he 
joined the faculty at Princeton in 1445. 

Dr. Alden enlisted as a private in the 
U. S. Army Air Force and rose to the 
rank of captain. He served with the 
Eighth Air Force and the Office oi 
Strategic Services, winning the Bronze 
Star and the Croix de Guerre. 



His books include Marcel Proust and 
his French Critics (1940), Introduction 
to Trench Masterpieces (l l )4S). Pre- 
mier Manuel (1954). and Jacques de 
Lacretelle, An Intellectual Itinerary 
(1958). He has also edited a Cheek 
List for the teaching of modern foreign 
languages. For years he has compiled 
the Modern Language Association's an- 
nual bibliography for the French twen- 
tieth century. At Maryland he is teach- 
ing advanced French composition and 
a graduate course in 20th-century 
French novelists. 

(Continued on next page) 



September-October, 1961 



21 



In 1937 Professor Alden married 
Martha S. Bow ditch; they have two 
daughters, aged 19 and 17. Mrs. Alden 
i- a graduate of Middlebury and a 
teacher of German. 



History Notes 

Rolfe L. Allen, Maryland A.B. '34; M.S. 
'35; Ph.D. '37, is serving currently as 
"Educational Adviser to DCSOPS 



(Deputy Chief of Staff for Military 
Operations)." 

Robert B. Appleton teaches econom- 
ics at Bethesda-Chevy Chase High 
School. 

Gerald S. Brinton, Chairman Social 
Studies Department, Cedar Cliff Senior 
High School, New Cumberland, Pennsyl- 
vania, has been serving on the curricu- 
lum committee of the Pennsylvania 
Council for Social Studies during the 
past year. In this capacity he has helped 



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prepare the Council's two recent publi- 
cations: A Recommended Curriculum 
in the Social Studies for the Secondary 
Schools and Curriculum Suggestions 
and Teaching Aids for the World Cul- 
tures Course. 

Bert B. Cohen is teaching at Mount 
Vernon High School in Alexandria, Vir- 
ginia. 

Gerald G. Herdman has spent the 
past year as a member of the Depart- 
ment of History of Emmanuel Mission- 
ary College in Berrien Springs, Michi- 
gan. 

Norman W. Hicks, together with the 
late Lynn Montross, contributed a two- 
part article to the December, 1960-Jan- 
uary, 1961 issue of Leatherneck Maga- 
zine, commemorating the tenth anni- 
versary of the Korean War. During the 
past year Hicks has also worked on 
Volume IV of the History of U. S. Ma- 
rine Corps Operations in Korea. 

S. Marie Black Hyde has just com- 
pleted a two-year term as President of 
the American Association for the United 
Nations, Capital Area Division as well 
as serving as lecturer at the Interna- 
tional Center on the Role of the Citizen 
in a Democracy. 

Louis A. Kenny, Maryland Ph.D. '60, 
is now College Librarian of San Diego 
State College in California. 

Walter O. Moeller is serving as As- 
sistant Director of the Vergilian Society 
of America's Summer School program 
at Cuma (Italy). 

James F. Morrow, Maryland MA. 
'57, inaugurated a course in Russian 
history for juniors and seniors at New 
Trier Township High School, Winnetka, 
Illinois. 

Richard H. Melton is a research as- 
sistant at the Library of Congress, Legis- 
lative Reference Service, while awaiting 
appointment as a Foreign Service Officer 
with the State Department. 

Frank M. Murphy published "A So- 
viet Naval Goal: Satellite Seas," in the 
April, 1961 United States Naval Pro- 
ceedings. 

Fred and Jan (Brewer) Spigler live 
in Salisbury, Maryland, where Fred is 
General Supervisor of Curriculum and 
Instruction at Salisbury High School 
and Wicomico Senior High School. 

Frank Waselewski is an analyst with 
Naval Intelligence at Ft. Meade, Mary- 
land. 

Frank F. White, Jr., Junior Archivist, 
Maryland Hall of Records, contributed 
"Advice to a Young Traveller Touring 
the British Isles, 1817," to the Novem- 
ber, 1960 issue of the Historian. 

Norman J. Wise, M.A. '57, not only 
teaches in one of Baltimore's high 
schools but also serves as editor of the 
Historiographer, publication of the His- 
tory Teachers' Association of Maryland. 

William H. Wroten, Jr., is professor 
of American History at State Teachers 
College, Salisbury, Maryland. 



22 



the Maryland Magazine 



Personal Notes 

J. Keith Lawson, Ph.D. '38, has been 
promoted to the position ot Scientist in 
the newly-created research scientist 
program within Chemstrand Research 
Center, Inc., Durham, North Carolina. 

John C. Barnes, '53, has been named 
to the scientific committee of Kodak 
Research Laboratories. 

Fred A. Kahn, '60, and John D. Pow- 
ell. '55, have entered their first year as 
graduate students at the School for Ad- 
vanced International Studies in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

J. Wayne Hisle, '32, has been named 
as a Vice President at Rockefeller 
Center. 

Capt. Nicholas C. Nicholas, '52, has 
been awarded the coveted Air Force 
medal for his outstanding work as base- 
Physiological Training Chief. 

Ruth Ann Voth. M.A. '59, is a lec- 
turer in English at the University of 
Hawaii. 

Theodore H. Erbe, '36, partner in the 
insurance firm of T. H. Erbe Co., has 
sold over a million dollars in life in- 
surance for the fifth consecutive year, 
placing him among the leaders in The 
Travelers Insurance Company. 

J. William Wright, '52, physicist in 
the Sun-Earth Relationships Section of 
the National Bureau of Standards, 
Boulder, Colorado, has been awarded 
the U. S. Department of Commerce 
Silver Medal for Meritorious Service. 

James G. Sousane. '61, has been se- 
lected for the Peace Corps, and will be 
sent to the Philippines, where he will 
teach English to third and fourth 
graders. 

Col. James A. DeMarco, '29, retired 
July 31 after 30 years' service as an Air 
Force officer. 

Lt. Gen. Joseph C. Burger, '25, com- 
manding general of the Atlantic Fleet 
Marine Force, will retire November 1. 

John L. Warren, Ph.D. '60, has been 
employed by the University of Cali- 
fornia's Los Alamos Scientific Labora- 
tory as a Physicist in the Physics Divi- 
sion. 

Judith Barbara Brenner, '59, received 
Master of Arts in speech and hearing 
therapy from Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, Cleveland, Ohio. 

John K. Taylor, Ph.D. '41, has been 
appointed Chief of the Applied Analy- 
tical Research Section of the National 
Bureau of Standard's Analytical and 
Inorganic Chemistry Division. 

Charles H. Starliper, '60. has been 
commissioned a Navy Ensign upon his 
completion of the Naval School of Pre- 
Flight at the Naval Air Station, Pensa- 
cola, Florida. 

Henry W. Washburn, '32, joined Air- 
craft Armaments, Inc. after gaining 
twenty years' experience in the technical 
writing field with such companies as 







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Bendix Radio, Page Communications, 
and the Martin Company. 

William Winfield Walton, Ph.D. '47. 
has recently been appointed Chief of 
the Organic Building Materials Section 
of the Building Research Division at the 
National Bureau of Standards. 

Robert Burton Isaacson. Ph.D. '61, 
has joined the staff of the chemicals re- 
search division of Esso Research and 
Engineering Company. 

Norman W. Bazley. Ph.D. '59. has 
joined the Applied Mathematics Divi- 



sion of the National Bureau of Stand- 
ards. 

Director Appointed 

Dr. S. M. Vinocour has accepted ap- 
pointment as Director of the major- 
study sequence in Public Relations at the 
University of Maryland. A public-rela- 
tions practitioner. Dr. Vinocour is Presi- 
dent of Executive Development Serv- 
ices. Washington-based public-relations 

(Continued on next page) 



September-October, 1961 



23 



firm. The P.R. sequence, in the Depart- 
ment of Journalism and Public Rela- 
tions, is one of five such units profes- 
sionally accredited by the American 
Council on Education for Journalism. 
\ inocour is Chairman of the Education 
Committee and on the Board of Direc- 
tors of the Public Relations Society of 
America (Washington), and Past Presi- 
dent of the American Public Relations 
Association (Washington). He received 
his doctorate in communications from 
the Pennsylvania State University. 



Assistant Manager of Student 
Union 

Harvey T. Casbarian, Jr., '55, has been 
appointed Assistant Manager of the Col- 
lege Park Student Union. 

Mr. Casbarian majored in Journal- 
ism, was Sports Editor of the Diamond- 
back and a member of Pi Delta Epsi- 
lon. He was also a member of Alpha 
Tau Omega social fraternity. 

Following graduation he joined the 
Maryland State Police as a trooper and 



was there, working out of the College 
Park Post, until his appointment to the 
Student Union position in September, 
1960. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 



WHY SPACE ? 



-5' 






>&* 















£ 



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These and other answers, some of them felt rather 
than stated, have justified the beginning of many 
grand adventures — and have later been justified by 
history. 

Building on such sound past experience, Martin 
continues to combine research and development in 
disciplines as diverse as electronics and anthropol- 
ogy, chemistry and biology, to extend the marvels of 
science through the age of space. 



'51 Graduate Appointed Sales 
Manager 

Roy H. Robertson, '51, has been named 
manager of Johnson & Johnson's North- 
eastern Sales Division with headquarters 
in Boston. He will direct sales in Mas- 
sachusetts, Connecticut, Maine, New 
Hampshire and Rhode Island. 

Mr. Eierman, Senior Officer 

Warren H. Eierman, '43, has recently 
joined the staff of the First National 
Bank of Miami, Florida, as Senior Vice 
President in charge of Business Devel- 
opment. 

Before coming to Miami, Mr. Eier- 
man was employed by The Hanover 



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24 



the Maryland Magazine 



Bank in New York serving as Viee 
President in charge of Business Devel- 
opment for the Trust Department. He 
is author of numerous articles on trust 
matters as well as being a frequent lec- 
turer in the fiekl. 



Personal Notes 

H. Frank Wilkins, '52, has been ap- 
pointed manager of the International 
Business Machines Corporation branch 
office in Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Lt. Col. Franklyn W. Donahue, "56, 
recently assumed command of the 394th 
Transportation Battalion, Camp Leroy 
Johnson, New Orleans 40, Louisiana. 

John Forchielli, '57, has joined the 
General Electric-operated Knolls Atomic 
Power Laboratory as a contract ad- 
ministrator. 

Kathleen Tyrrell, '57, recently gradu- 
ated from airline stewardess school. 

Edward J. Kroupa, '52, has been 
promoted to assistant superintendent by 
the Western Electric Company. 



School of 

DENTISTRY 



Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S. 



The E. Benton Taylor Scholarship 

The E. Benton Taylor Scholarship, 
awarded annually through the National 
Alumni Association of the University's 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
has been given this year to David Ser- 
anton Meroney of Silver Spring. 

Eligibility for the Scholarship, which 
was created in 1954 by Mrs. E. Benton 
Taylor in memory of her late husband, 
is open to all entering freshmen in the 
Dental School who are residents of 
Maryland. The funds granted are desig- 
nated to meet tuition and other fees, 
books, instruments, and equipment dur- 
ing all four years of the Dental School 
course. 



Alumni Elect Officers 

The Alumni Association of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland, has 
elected Joseph P. Cappuccio, '46, Balti- 
more, Maryland, as its President. 

Other officers are, President-elect: 
Lewis C. Toomey, '42, Silver Spring, 
Maryland; First Vice-president: E. Mil- 
burn Colvin, Jr., '25, Washington, D. C: 
Second Vice-president: Frank P. Gilley, 
(Continued on next page) 

September-October , 1961 





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J. Gaver, '54, Baltimore, Maryland; 
Treasurer: C. Adam Bock, '22, Balti- 
more, Maryland; Historian-librarian: 
J. Ben Robinson, '14, Baltimore, Mary- 
land, Editor; Kyrle W. Preis, '29, Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Executive council members are: 
1962, L. Lynn Emmart, '22, Baltimore, 
Maryland, and J. Philip Norris, '56, 
Baltimore, Maryland; 1963, Eugene A. 
Leatherman, '54, Baltimore, Maryland, 
and Benjamin A. Williamowsky, '48, 
Takoma Park, Maryland; 1964, Wil- 
liam W. Noel, '35, Hagerstown, Mary- 
land, and Russell P. Smith, Jr., '43, 
Cambridge, Maryland; Past President 
Daniel F. Lynch, '25, Washington, 
D. C, 1962. 

University alumni council represen- 
tatives are: 1962, Harry Levin, '26, 
Baltimore, Maryland, Chairman; 1963, 
Edward D. Stone, '25, Baltimore, Mary- 
land; and 1964, Charles E. Broadrup, 
'32, Frederick, Maryland. Endowment 
Fund trustees are: 1962, Ashur G. 
Chavoor, '48, Washington, D. C, and 
Arthur I. Bell, '19, Baltimore, Mary- 
land, Secretary-Treasurer; 1963, Peter 
T. Kanelos, '37, Providence, R. L, and 
Jesse Trager, '34, Baltimore, Maryland; 
1964, Gerald A. Devlin, '23, Westfield, 
N. J., and Howard Van Natta, '14, Bal- 
timore, Maryland. 



Elected 

At a recent meeting of the Maryland 
State Dental Association the officers 
elected were all alumni of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland. Elected 
were: Max Baklor, '16, President; Doug- 
las Browning, '34, Past President; Wil- 
liam T. Fridinger, '48, President Elect; 
Charles P. McCausland, '38, Vice Presi- 
dent; William Schunick, '34, Secretary; 
Harry W. Dressel, Jr., '45, Treasurer; 
Lawrence Bimestefer, '34, Editor; H. 
Berton McCauley, Jr., '36, Historian. 

Jose A. Zequeira, '51, is now serving 
as President of the Puerto Rico Section 
of the Alumni Association, and is also 
President Elect of the Puerto Rico den- 
tal association. 

He is a member of the American Den- 
tal Association and the American So- 
ciety of Dentistry for Children — a mem- 
ber of Xi Psi Phi dental fraternity and 
is now head of the Department of Endo- 
dontics at the Dental School, University 
of Puerto Rico. He limits his practice 
to endodontics and crown and bridge 
prosthesis. The alumni association con- 
gratulates Dr. Zequeira and sends best 
wishes to his family. 

Troy C. Lugar, '22, from Matoaka, 
W. Virginia, was elected President of 
the Mercer-McDowell Dental Society at 
a recent meeting of that group held at 
the West Virginia Hotel, Bluefield. 



26 



the Maryland Magazine 



Joseph R. Board, '45, of Anderson. 
S. C, is now serving as Editor-in-Chief 
of the South Carolina Dental Journal. 

Roy T. Dorocher, '50, has been 
elected as a Faculty Member of the Eta 
Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon 
Fraternity and has been promoted to 
Assistant Professor of Oral Medicine at 
the University of Pennsylvania. 

Harry L. Mertz, Jr., '56, was elected 
to the office of Secretary-Treasurer of 
the Panama Canal Zone Dental Society 
for 1960-61 term. The PCZDS is a con- 
stituent society of the American Dental 
Association and is the dental society for 
the civilian and military dentists prac- 
ticing within the Canal Zone. 

Dr. Mertz is currently serving as a 
dental officer at the Fort Clayton Den- 
tal Clinic in the Canal Zone, accom- 
panied by his wife and three children. 
Upon completion of his tour in the 
spring of 1962, he expects to return 
to the Maryland area. 

At the annual meeting of the Mary- 
land Section of the American College 
of Dentists held in Baltimore this past 
January, William E. Trail, '26, was 
elected Vice Chairman and Irving 
Abramson, '32, was elected Secretary- 
Treasurer. 



Appointed 



George M. Anderson 

Maryland, has been 

National Advisory 

Chronic Disease and the Health of the 

Aged, U. S. Public Health Service. Dr. 



19, of Baltimore, 
ippointed to the 
Committee on 



Anderson is a former professoi of 
orthodontics at the University ol Mary- 
land Dental School, his alma mater, 
which conferred on him in 1956 the 
Doctor of Science degree as well as its 
Firsl Distinguished Alumnus Award. 
Frank P. Cammarano, '38, has been 

appointed to the State Board o! 1 du- 
ration of New Haven. Dr. Cammarano 
is a past president oi the New Haven 
Dental Association. 



Maine Ai.umni Oi i k irs iin i in 

At a recent meeting of the Maine 
Alumni Section the following officers 
were elected: President, Robert Chis- 
holm; Vice-President, Joseph Ken- 
neally; Secretary. Simon Bereson. 
Treasurer, Booth l.eavitt; Director, l.e- 
Roy Whitney; and Editor, Walter 
Strang. 

Edward C. Morin Honored 

At the annual dinner meeting of the 
Rhode Island section of the Alumni 
Association, William F. Decesare pre- 
sented the Rhode Island Distinguished 
Alumni Award to Edward C. Morin, 
'20. Dr. Morin, the first President of 
the Rhode Island Alumni Section and 
a Past President of the Rhode Island 
State Dental Society, expressed his 
heartfelt gratitude upon being so hon- 
ored and assured all present of his con- 
tinuing interest in alumni activities. 

(Continued on next page) 



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Saul Gale Honored 

Saul Gale, '22, received the Distin- 
guished Alumni Award from the New 
Jersey Section of the Alumni Associa- 
tion at their annual meeting in October, 
1960. Dr. Gale's son, Allen Gale, '50, 
presented this award to his father. 

Dr. Gale's dedication to the dental 
profession and his fine sense of civic 
responsibility are demonstrated by his 
various activities. Presently he is Chair- 
man of the Relief Committee of the 
New Jersey State Dental Society and 
active in the United Jewish Appeal. For 
many years Dr. Gale has given clinics 
on prosthetics before local, state and 
national societies and he is co-author of 
a paper on "Wax Rebasing of Full Up- 
per and Lower Dentures under Pres- 
sure" published in the American Dental 
Association Journal and the Year Book 
of Dentistry. 



Personals 

Paul R. Roulier, '12, from Laconia, New 
Hampshire, who has practiced dentistry 
for nearly half a century says hard work 
and one or two good hobbies are the 
recipe for good health. At 69 he still 
plays tennis regularly at Opechee Park 
and is good enough to defeat his grand- 
sons at least half the time, he says. 
Swimming, walking, and gardening are 



his other hobbies and he attributes his 
good health to these activities in great 
part. 

Morris Cramer, '17, who recently re- 
tired from the active practice of den- 
tistry, visited Baltimore during the 
Christmas holiday season. We are hap- 
py to report that his health has im- 
proved markedly. 

Dr. Cramer has held membership and 
positions of leadership in many profes- 
sional, philanthropic, and fraternal 
groups. He is a Past President of the 
Baltimore City Dental Society and 
Maryland State Dental Association and 
Alumni Club Alpha Omega fraternity; 
a Fellow of the American College of 
Dentists; member of Omicron Kappa 
Upsilon Honorary Dental Society; for- 
mer director of the Dental Division of 
Baltimore City Health Department; Den- 
tal Surgeon at Sinai Hospital; Past Com- 
mander of Maccabean Post, American 
Legion; Member of Amicable Lodge 
A.F. & A.M.; a 32nd degree Mason 
and Past Monarch of Yedz Grotto, 
M.O.V.P.E.R.; and Past President of the 
Middle Atlantic Grotto Association. 

Russell P. Smith, Jr., '43, former 
Mayor of Cambridge for two four-year- 
terms and former Chairman of the 
Legislative Committee of the Maryland 
Municipal League, is now serving as 
the Chairman of the Legislative Council 
of the Maryland State Dental Associa- 
tion. Several years ago he served as a 



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28 



the Maryland Magazine 



RESIDENTIAL IRON WORK 



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Signers 



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1933 



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RAILINGS • BALCONIES 

GATES • COLUMNS 

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Delegate from the American Municipal 
Association to a Conference ol Inter- 
national Union of Local Governments 
held at the Hague, Netherlands. Dr. 

Smith has been active in civic, social. 

and protession.il affairs and is currentlj 
serving on the Executive Committee ol 
the Alumni Association. 



College of 

EDUCATION 

Mary J. A halt 



Dr. J am lis L. Hymes 

Dr. James L. Hymes, Jr. is Professor 
ol Education and Chairman of the 
Childhood Education Department of the 
University. 

Dr. Hymes has written extensively 
for parents and teachers. His writing 
and his teaching are noted for their 
simplicity and soundness. In addition to 
many pamphlets and magazine articles, 
he is the author of Understanding Your 
Child, Effective Home-School Relations, 
A Child Development Point of View. 
Behavior and Misbehavior, and Before 
The Child Reads. He has written two 
sets of stories for children who are 
learning to read, the Books To Start On 
and the Books To Stretch On. His latest 
publication. Hooray for Chocolate, a 
collection of easy-to-read and humorous 
jingles, was written in collaboration with 
his wife. 



Personal Notes 

Mrs. George T. Warren (the former 
Georgiana Lightfoot), '38, has been 
named Regional Chairman of the Na- 
tional Cathedral Association for the Dio- 
cese of Easton. 

Frank Carroll Fellows, M.A. '57. 
who played basketball under Coach Bud 
Millikan. has been named Millikan's 
Assistant Coach. 

Donald G. Busco. M.A. '51, has been 
promoted to Manager of Management 
Development — Plants and Laboratories 
for the European Area of IBM World 
Trade Corporation, a wholly-owned sub- 
sidiary of International Business Ma- 
chines. In his new post, Mr. Busco will 
be assigned to the IBM World Trade 
European Educational Center at Blari- 
cum in The Netherlands. 

Malvin S. Cagen, '45, has been named 
manager of The Kordite Company's 
new plastics manufacturing facilities in 
Macedon. New York. 

(Continued on next page) 



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Col. James D. De Marr, '30, has been 
appointed Signal Officer of the First 
United States Army, with Headquarters 
at Governors Island, N. Y. 



Alumni Notes 

Edwin A. Kucharski, '61, has joined 
Electro-Mechanical Research, Inc., as 
a Systems Engineer. 

Kenneth W. Knorr, '48, has been 
named Sales Engineer, southeastern re- 
gion for Samuel M. Langston Company, 
Camden, New Jersey. 

Gerald J. Ferguson, Jr., '58, is now 
employed by the U. S. Patent Office as 
a Patent Examiner. 

Warner T. Smith, '38, has been ap- 
pointed Chief Engineer for Superior 
Cable Co., Hickory, North Carolina. 

Nathan W. Childs, '55, has been 
named as Asphalt Salesman for the 
Del.-Md.-D.C. area of Esso Standard, 
Division of Humble Oil & Refining 
Company. 

Maurice D. Starr, '49, has attained 
status as Professional Engineer as a Ma- 
rine Engineer for USN, Bureau of Ships. 

Charles F. Cashell, '31, recently re- 
ceived his sixth work performance 
award at the U. S. Army Engineer Re- 
search and Development Laboratories, 
Belvoir. 

Sanford S. Sternstein, '58, received a 
$2,000 graduate fellowship grant from 
Allied Chemical's Solvay Process Divi- 
sion. 

William A. Dynes, '28, has been made 
Chief of the Analysis and Education 
Section, Interceptor Control Branch at 
Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio. 

C. Gilbert Hoffman, Sr., '33, is Presi- 
dent of The Arundel Bus Co., Annap- 
olis, Maryland, and a partner in the 
Hoffman Truck Center. 

The Rev. George T. Eppley, '33, 
vicar in Atascadero, California, has re- 
ceived a call from St. John's Episcopal 
Church, Los Angeles, and will assume 
his duties this Spring. 

James R. Bookstaver, '52, has been 
promoted to Manager, Product Engi- 
neering Group with the International 



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30 



the Maryland Magazine 



Business Machines Corporation. Mr. 
Bookstaver is now living in Endicott, 
New York. 

Lt. Commander Robert F. Cooper, 
'50, participated in LOGEX 61, an 
Army conducted logistical field train- 
ing exercise at Fort Lee, Virginia, which 
ended May 13. 

Robert M. Walker, '32, and Neil C. 
Read, '33, have received superior Per- 
formance Awards for their work at the 
Department of Commerce, U. S. Patent 
Office as Patent Examiners. 

Colonel John T. O'Neill, '3 1 , retired 
after 30 years of service in the Army 
National Guard and Regular Army. He 
will be engaged as a Consulting Engi- 
neer to the Triborough Bridge and Tun- 
nel Authority in New York City. 

He will be associated with the Ver- 
razano-Narrows Bridge between Brook- 
lyn and Staten Island, slated for com- 
pletion in 1965. 



Maryland Beta Tau Beta Pi 
Scholarship Award 

The Advisory Board of the Maryland 
Beta Chapter of Tau Beta Pi selected 
two engineering students, Guilio Cesare 
Chima and George Lewis Perseghin, as 
the first recipients of the Maryland Beta 
Tau Beta Pi Scholarship Award. 



Civil Engineering Honor 
Society Becomes National 

On May 12, 1961, the independent 
Civil Engineering Honor Society of the 
University of Maryland was installed 
as an official chapter of Chi Epsilon, 
the national Civil Enginering honorary 
fraternity. 

In the spring of 1957, Mr. Gerard 
H. Schlimm, '57, after corresponding 
with Mr. Gerald B. Wilson, Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Chi Epsilon Fraternity 
and together with assistance from As- 
sistant Dean Russell B. Allen, drew up 
a constitution for a local society pat- 
terned after that of the national fra- 
ternity, Chi Epsilon. Nine of the top 
juniors in Civil Engineering were con- 
tacted and joined with the eight seniors 
in supporting the constitution and, thus, 
the Civil Engineering Honor Society of 
the University of Maryland was formed. 
The Society received official recognition 
shortly afterwards when on May 9, 
1957, its constitution received the ap- 
proval of the Student Life Committee 
of the University of Maryland. 

The alumni charter members of the 
Maryland Chapter of Chi Epsilon are 
Frederick A. Bowers, '57, Gerard H. 
Schlimm, '57, Louis A. Spittel, Jr., '57, 
Milton H. Wills, Jr., '58, Robert H. 
Baumgardner, '59, Melvin J. Deale, '59, 
James P. Goodloe, Jr., '60, James H. 

(Continued on next page) 



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Robinson, Jr., '60, and William J. 
Rosen, '60. 

Members of the graduating class of 
1961 who are charter members of Chi 
Epsilon are Paul D. Dollenberg, Ronald 
L. Gordon, John H. Hunter, Richard J. 
Kerslake, Danny C. King, Guenther W. 
Lerch, David A. Lingrell, Joseph T. 
Kammerer, James H. Pielert, Howard 
F. Stup, Walter E. Sykes, Joseph D. 
Tonkin, Richard J. Van Elburg, and 
David J. Wakefield. 

Honor members are Dean Russell B. 
Allen (Yale '23) and Professor Louis 
E. Otts (Texas A. and M. '46). 

At the present time the chapter has 
twenty-two undergraduate members and 
seven pledges. 

Officers for the 1961-1962 school 
year are President, Thomas Crane; Vice 
President, James Erickson; Secretary, 
Richard Meininger; Treasurer, Terry 
Gossard; Historian-Transit Editor, Ro- 
bert Lubbert; Marshall, Richard Rader. 



New Instructors 

Gerard H. Schlimm, '57, one of the 
founders of the Civil Engineering Honor 
Society at the University of Maryland, 
has just completed his first year as 
instructor at the University of Mary- 
land in Civil Engineering and is working 
toward the Ph.D. in Civil Engineering. 
Jerome V. Larson, '60, and Russell 
Glock, Jr., '59, have also just finished 
their first year as instructors in Elec- 
trical Engineering at the University. 
Both are studying toward the Ph.D. in 
Electrical Engineering. 



Dr. Weber Lectures 

Dr. Joseph Weber, Professor of Elec- 
trical Engineering and Professor of 
Physics, who is recognized as an out- 
standing research scientist in the field 
of gravitational waves, has just com- 
pleted a series of lectures in Italy this 
past June. 



Receive Advanced Degrees 

Carl F. Koch, '57, who just received the 
Master of Science degree in Electrical 
Engineering from the University of 
Maryland, is now working for Radia- 
tion, Inc., in Florida. 

Norman W. Sheetz, Jr., '58, just re- 
ceived the Master of Science degree in 
Aeronautical Engineering from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Gerald L. Fuller, '59, just received 
the Master of Science degree in Elec- 
trical Engineering from the University 
of Maryland and is now working for 
ACF Industries. He is also studying 
part-time toward the Ph.D. in Electrical 
Engineering at the University. 



32 



the Maryland Magazine 



June, 1961, Military Awards 

The Armed Forces Communication and 
Electronics Association Award was pre- 
sented to Albert W. Small, '61, as be- 
ing the senior cadet who had demon- 
strated outstanding qualities of military 
leadership, high moral character, and 
definite aptitude for military service. 

Richard S. Reilly, '61, was presented 
the Glenn L. Martin Award as the out- 
standing senior cadet majoring in Aero- 
nautical Engineering who had applied 
for flight training. 

The recipient of the Society of Amer- 
ican Military Engineers Award to the 
senior cadet displaying outstanding scho- 
lastic achievement and leadership and 
majoring in the field of engineering was 
Urban H. Lynch, '61. 



Alumni in Business 

George C. Webster, '43, formerly Presi- 
dent of John G. Webster and Sons in 
Washington, D. C. and now of George 
C. Webster and Associates, Inc., 1223 
Connecticut Avenue, N.W., has been 
recently elected to the Board of Direc- 
tors of Capital Film Laboratories, Inc. 

Dr. R. J. White, Jr., '48, who received 
the Master of Science in Electrical En- 
gineering in 1953, was formerly Direc- 
tor of Research, Frederick Research 
Corporation, and has now formed his 
own firm, Don White Associates, in 
Bethesda, Maryland. 

Robert Langmack, '53, now has his 
own engineering firm in Torrance, Cali- 
fornia, which erects geodesic domes and 
makes sealers for them. 



Marylanders at Charles H. 
Tompkins Company 

Maryland graduates hold responsible po- 
sitions with the Charles H. Tompkins 
Company, the Washington, D. C. branch 
office of the J. A. Jones Construction 
Company. 

J. Slater Davidson, Jr., Engin. '28, 
is the Vice President and General Man- 
ager of the Washington branch. Mr. 
Davidson is a registered, licensed engi- 
neer in the District of Columbia and 
Maryland. Formerly Chief Engineer of 
the Tompkins Company, he has been 
Vice President since 1948. 

Also on the Tompkins executive staff 
is John P. Smith, Engin. '39, Vice 
President and Chief of Estimating and 
Purchasing Department. Working in this 
section under Mr. Smith are Maryland 
graduates Leroy M. Childs, '17, and 
Carlton L. Bell, '53. 

John D. Muncks, Engin. '39, is in the 
Project Management and Coordination 
Section. 

(Continued on next page) 



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Une Snade Shop 

and AFFILIATED PRODUCTS 

2214 M Street, N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

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Manufacturers and Distributors 

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A' Folding Doors 

Ar Draperies and Rods 

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A" Inside Shutters 

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A" Vertical Blinds 

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THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

1020 WEST PRATT STREET 

Phone MUlberry 5-6070 Baltimore 23, Md. 



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September-October, 1961 



33 




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Fayette at Hanover Streets 

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All accounts insured up lo $10,000.00 
by an agency of the United States Gov't 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



The Asphalt Service Co. 

Inc. 

1836 Chesapeake Ave. 
Elgin 5-1560-61 

BALTIMORE 26, MD. 



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College of 

HOME ECONOMICS 

New Curriculum 

A new curriculum with a "strong rele- 
vance to the family as the basic con- 
suming unit of society," has been ap- 
proved for the College of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Dean Selma F. Lippeatt reports that 
the new 15-credit block basic curricu- 
lum will be family-related and family 
oriented and graduate research in the 
College will look more deeply into fam- 
ily living problems. 

Dean Lippeatt heralded the College's 
greatly expanded research in the "social 
and behavioral science based" areas of 
home economics such as management 
theory and values, decision making, and 
trends in family living patterns. Re- 
search will be intensified in the tradi- 
tional field of food and nutrition, tex- 
tiles and clothing, and management. 

Dean Lippeatt noted that the most 
significant recent strides in the College 
have been in research planning and 
graduate preparation. 

The new curriculum design identifies 
three major areas into which graduates 
are qualified to enter professionally: 
educational, community-family life; 
technical; and commercial consumer 
areas. 

The course content of the new cur- 
riculum is designed especially for those 
who will take a bachelor's degree in 
home economics, but of interest to all 
young people. These courses, she said, 
"have a strong anchor of relevance to 
the family, not only the typical Amer- 
ican family but the institution of the 
family as it exists around the world." 

Personal Notes 

Mrs. William S. Nalley, '39, was ap- 
pointed leader of the Girl Scout-Ex- 
periment in International Living co- 
operative group to Vancouver, British 
Columbia for the 1961 summer pro- 
gram. 

Patricia A. Powell, '61, Home Eco- 
nomics, is employed as a home service 
representative by Jersey Central Power 
& Light Company. Miss Powell will 
work out of the Morristown commer- 
cial office. 

Erna Mae Behrend, '34, nutritionist 
for the A. D. Williams Memorial Clinics 
of the Medical College of Virginia, re- 
ceived the John G. Kolbe award in rec- 
ognition for her contribution to the 
dietetic profession, her contribution to 
the community and her service in the 
field of promoting professional dietetics 
among groups. 



34 



the Maryland Magazine 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



Awarded Grant of $20,000 

The National Science Foundation has 
awarded a grant of $20,000 to Dr. Ed- 
ward J. Herbst, Professor of Biochem- 
istry and Acting Head of the Depart- 
ment at the University's School of Medi- 
cine, toward continuance for another 
two years of research that the Founda- 
tion has already supported for the past 
two years, on the molecular form and 
function of spermine. 

He is being assisted in the research 
by Joseph L. Colbourn, a graduate stu- 
dent in the Department of Biochemistry. 



Insulin May Act as Metabolic 
Clutch 

The possibility that insulin may act as 
a "metabolic clutch" in releasing energy 
within living cells was discussed this 
summer at the 5th International Con- 
gress on Biochemistry in Moscow by 
Dr. Samuel P. Bessman, Professor of 
Pediatric Research and Associate Pro- 
fessor of Biochemistry at the Univer- 
sity's School of Medicine. 

The action of insulin is still not un- 
derstood, in spite of its being used suc- 
cessfully to control diabetes ever since 
it was isolated from pancreatic tissue 
almost forty years ago. Recent evidence, 
however, shows that its effect goes far 
beyond the role originally assigned it 
in regulating the metabolism of sugar 
and other carbohydrates. 

Dr. Bessman has demonstrated insu- 
lin's specific action in binding trypto- 
phan to muscle protein. Tryptophan is 
an essential amino acid, one of the ele- 
ments that the body uses in manufactur- 
ing the complex structure of the protein 
molecule. 

Insulin's action in stimulating protein 
synthesis has already been demonstrated 
by other workers. In the description 
of his overall theory about the mecha- 
nism of insulin, Dr. Bessman discussed 
the relationship of his own findings to 
the broader problems of protein syn- 
thesis and the release of cellular energy 
in the body. 

He believes that insulin acts as a 
temporary mechanical link between in- 
tracellular particles and in this way 
orients and organizes these particles in 
their intricate biochemical reactions. 

(Continued on next page) 



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President of SAMA 

William B. Weglicki, Jr., third-year 
medical student at the University, was 
elected President of the Student Amer- 
ican Medical Association (SAMA) at 
the organization's national meeting in 
Chicago earlier this year. 

The meeting was attended by 1,800 
SAMA members from more than 70 
of the Nation's 86 medical schools, in- 
cluding seven representatives of the Uni- 
versity's School of Medicine. 

Cardiac Catheterization 
Laboratory 

A new cardiac catheterization labora- 
tory has been established at University 
Hospital in which X-ray movies can be 
made that map in minute detail the 
heart chambers and the main vessels 
of the heart. 

By this means any heart defects that 
need surgical correction can be located 
quickly and precisely. 

The new $65,000 laboratory is under 
the direction of Dr. Robert Boudreau 
for University Hospital's Department of 
Radiology and Dr. Robert Singleton for 
the Division of Cardiology. 

Dr. Herrmann Joins Mayo Clinic 

Dr. Ernest C. Herrmann, '51, Ph.D. '53, 
of Bloomfield, New Jersey, has been ap- 
pointed to the staff of the Mayo Clinic, 
Rochester, Minnestota, as a consultant 
in microbiology. Dr. Herrmann was re- 
search associate in the Institute of Mi- 
crobiology at Rutgers University from 
June, 1953, until September, 1954, when 
he became head of the Virus Laboratory 
at E. R. Squibb and Sons. Since Decem- 
ber, 1955, he has been head of the Virus 
and Tissue Culture Laboratory at Scher- 
ing Corporation in Bloomfield. 

Elected a Member 

Dr. Sheldon E. Greisman, Assistant 
Professor in the Departments of Medi- 
cine and Physiology at the University's 
School of Medicine, has been elected a 
member of the American Society for 
Clinical Investigation, whose member- 
ship includes many of the Nation's lead- 
ing medical researchers. 

Dr. Heyman Promoted to Full 
Professor at Duke University 

Dr. Albert Heyman, '40, has been pro- 
moted to full professor. He taught at 
Emory University from 1943 until com- 
ing to Duke in 1954. Dr. Heyman is 
active in research and has contributed 
numerous articles to scientific publica- 
tions. He is a member of leading pro- 
fessional organizations. 



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they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 
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11th & E Sts., N.W. Washington, D.C. 



36 



the Maryland Magazine 



Assistant Director of Nursing 
Service 

Ruth I. Buckley has been appointed 
Assistant Director of Nursing Service 
in charge of the operating and recovery 
rooms at University Hospital. 

Miss Burkley is a graduate of St. 
Joseph's Hospital School of Nursing, in 
Syracuse, New York. She also holds a 
bachelor's degree in nursing and a mas- 
ter's degree in nursing service admin- 
istration from Syracuse University. 

She has had experience in operating 
room procedures as a staff nurse, head 
nurse, and supervisor at the St. Joseph's 
Hospital, Grace-New Haven Commu- 
nity Hospital, and Yale University Medi- 
cal Center. 



Department of 
AIR SCIENCE 



Lt. Col. Riffe 
Named Assistant Chief of Staff 

Army Lieutenant Colonel James L. 
Riffe, '58, recently arrived in the U. S. 
Army's Berlin Command where he is 
assigned as the Assistant Chief of Staff, 
G-3 (Operation and Training). 

The mission of Berlin Command, 
composed of the only U. S. Army occu- 
pation troops remaining in the world 
and coinciding with the 81 -square-mile 
United States Sector of Berlin, is to pro- 
tect American rights and property in 
this isolated city deep in the Soviet Zone 
of Germany and to assist where neces- 
sary in maintaining law and order in 
a free Berlin. 

Col. Riffe was commissioned as Sec- 
ond Lieutenant in the Infantry after 
completing Officer's Candidate School 
in 1943. He received a Master's Degree 
in International Affairs from George 
Washington University in July of this 
year. Prior to his arrival in Berlin, the 
Colonel's previous military assignment 
was as a student at the Army War Col- 
lege at Carlisle Barracks, Pa. 

Col. Riffe now lives in the American 
Sector of Berlin. 



Personal Notes 

William D. Davis, '54, has been named 
Assistant Publicity Director of O. S. 
Tyson Company, Inc., trade and indus- 
trial advertising agency with headquar- 
ters at 230 Park Avenue in New York 
City. 

James C. Hawley, '58, recently re- 
tired from U. S. Navy and has joined 
the Raytheon Company as Regional 
Sales Manager, South America. 

(Continued on next page) 




MASSEY- FERGUSON, INC. 

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Christmas Clubs — -Safe Deposit Boxes 

Community Hall for Rent 

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September-October , 1961 



37 



YORK BUILDING PRODUCTS CO., 

Inc. 

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Phone York 8-2818 



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Private Label Solicited on All Items 



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Dispensing and Manufacturing 
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Complete Optical Laboratory 
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PLUMBING— HEATING 

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KITCHEN AND BATHROOM 

REMODELING 

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Radio Dispatched Trucks 



LOckwood 5-3001 

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Plumbing & Heating Contractor 



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School of 

PHARMACY 



Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 
Dr. B. Oiive Cole 



Stank Joins Eli Lilly 

Kenneth E. Stank, '60, a registered 
pharmacist in Maryland, has joined Eli 
Lilly and Company's sales force in 
Baltimore. 

Prior to joining, Mr. Stank was Man- 
ager of the Stansbury Pharmacy in 
Dundalk. He is a member of the Amer- 
ican Pharmaceutical Association and is 
President of the University's alumni 
chapter of Phi Delta Chi, professional 
pharmaceutical fraternity. 

Receives Two Grants 

The Department of Pharmacy is the re- 
cipient of two research grants totaling 
$86,500 for support of research on anti- 
cancer drugs. 

The research, which has been in prog- 
ress for three years under the direction 
of Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos, Associate 
Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 
involves the synthesis of new experi- 
mental steroids. 

The U. S. National Cancer Institute 
is awarding $79,000 to aid the research 
for three years and Amith, Kline and 
French Laboratories are contributing 
$7,500 for one year. Both grants are 
in continuation of support extended in 
past years. 



College of 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Professor Johnson Receives Awards 

Dr. Warren R. Johnson, Professor of 
Physical Education, recently received 
two awards in recognition of his book, 
Science and Medicine of Exercise and 
Sports. 

The first was presented by the Amer- 
ican College of Sports Medicine, and 
the second by The American Academy 
of Physical Education. The citations 
read as follows: 

American College of Sports Medicine 

Citation to Warren R. Johnson 
"Investigator, Editor and Author; 
Skilled in Promoting the Cause of 
Physical Fitness and Sports Medi- 
cine through the Written and Spoken 
Word." 
Signed: David Bruce Dill, 
President 

(Directorate of Medical 
Research. U. S. Army 
Chemical Center) 



38 



the Maryland Magazine 



The second citation read: 

"This certifies that Warren R. John- 
son received Citation from The 
American Academy of Physical Edu- 
cation for Publication: Editor, Sci- 
ence and Medicine of Exercise and 
Sports." 

Thomas McDonoucjh, President 

Professor Johnson's book was pre- 
sented to President Kennedy by Dr. Dill 
on behalf of the American College of 
Sports Medicine. 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 

(formerly College of Special and 
Continuation Studies) 

G. Allen Sager 




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or Call 

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Personnel Procurement Officer 

Lieutenant Colonel Robert D. Brumley, 
'61, has become Personnel Procurement 
Officer for Brooke Army Medical Cen- 
ter, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 

Ziegler Completes Command and 
Staff College 

William Ziegler, '60, Chief of the Mili- 
tary Test Equipment Branch in the Di- 
rectorate of Procurement and Produc- 
tion, has become one of the first Depot 
workers to graduate from the 21 -volume 
Command and Staff College Correspon- 
dence courses being conducted by the 
Extension Course Institute, Gunther 
Air Force Base, Alabama. The Course 
concentrates on a study of offensive and 
defensive warfare and familiarization 
with the Department of Defense organ- 
izational structure. 

Have Textbook — Will Travel 

Harold J. Vetter, Assistant Professor of 
Psychology in the Overseas program of 
University College, has currently pub- 
lished an article describing his experi- 
ences as a traveling teacher in the 
Alumni Bulletin of the University of 
Buffalo, his alma mater. 

Dr. Vetter has humorously titled his 
adventures, "Have Textbook — Will 
Travel." He described his orders to re- 
port for his first teaching assignment 
as only slightly less bulky "than the 
master plan for the invasion of Nor- 
mandy and nearly as simple as a Ti- 
betan colophon." 

Appointed Lieutenant Governor of 
American Samoa 

Major Eric J. Scanlan, '59, Provost 
Marshal at McGuire Air Force Base, 
has been appointed Government Secre- 
tary (Lt. Governor) of American Sa- 
moa by the Department of the Interior. 

(Continued on next page) 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

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BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 

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PLANT: 621-27 G STREET, N.W. REpublic 7-5400 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILLE, MD. WArfield 7-0880 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

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RE 
5-3000 


Producers and Distributors of 

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WASHINGTON 20, D.C. 







September-October, J 96 J 



39 




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School of 

SOCIAL WORK 

School Receives Private Library 

The professional library of the late 
Edith Lewis Lauer, Baltimore social 
worker, has been presented to the Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Social 
Work by Miss Lauer's brother-in-law 
and sister. Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Hol- 
lander. 

In announcing the gift. Dr. Verl S. 
Lewis, Dean of the School of Social 
Work, described it as a most important 
contribution toward the establishment 
of a library of social work literature at 
the University. He stated that the col- 
lection will be maintained in the Uni- 
versity's new Health Sciences Library 
and that according to the Librarian, 
Prof. Ida M. Robinson, it contains rare 
out-of-print books in the field of child 
welfare, in addition to the valuable ref- 
erence works. 

Originally a field secretary for the 
Jewish Children's Society, Miss Lauer 
became Executive Director of the Jew- 
ish Family and Children's Bureau when 
it was established in 1938. She joined 
the staff of the Child Welfare League 
of America in 1949 and was active in 
that organization until her death in 
1955. 

She was nationally known as an au- 
thority on child welfare work and 
served for a time as editor of the pro- 
fessional magazine Child Welfare. She 
wrote many articles about social services 
for children and was in great demand 
as a lecturer in schools of social work. 
Dr. Lewis first met her when he was a 
student in a summer course she taught 
at the University of California. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 

Dr. Eduard C. A. Uhlenhuth 

Dr. Eduard C. A. Uhlenhuth, Professor 
Emeritus of Anatomy at the University 
of Maryland Medical School, died May 
5 at the age of 75. He had been living 
in his native Austria and traveling in 
Europe since 1957, had been hospital- 
ized continuously since February with 
a heart ailment. 

Dr. Uhlenhuth received his doctorate 
in Zoology in 1911 from the University 
of Vienna and then became a biology 
research assistant at the Research Insti- 
tute, Vienna. 




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the Maryland Magazine 



In 1914, he came to the United States 
on a fellowship to the Rockefeller In- 
stitute for Medical Research, New York. 

He was married in New York to the 
former Elisabeth M. Baier, 1919. 

In 1924, Dr. Uhlenhuth became a 
naturalized American citizen, and in the 
same year he came to Baltimore as a 
guest in the Department of Anatomy of 
the Johns Hopkins University School of 
Medicine. 

The following year he was appointed 
Associate Professor of Anatomy at 
Maryland. Here he rose through the 
ranks of the Anatomy Department; Pro- 
fessor of Gross Anatomy, 1931; Profes- 
sor of Anatomy, 1933; Chairman of the 
Department of Gross Anatomy, 1936; 
Chairman of the Department of Anat- 
omy, 1949. 

Dr. Uhlenhuth retired in 1955. but 
continued his activity as a Research Pro- 
fessor until 1957. Mrs. Uhlenhuth also 
died that year. After her death he began 
periodic trips to Europe. 

Dr. Uhlenhuth was the founder and 
a former president of the University of 
Maryland Biological Society, a Fellow 
of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, and a member 
of the Society for Experimental Biology 
and Medicine. 

He was also a member of the Amer- 
ican Association of Anatomists, the Har- 
vey Society and the Society for the 
Study of Internal Secretions. 

Dr. Uhlenhuth is survived by his sec- 
ond wife, Mrs. Renee Von Bronneck 
Uhlenhuth, whom he married in Vienna 
last February; his son. Dr. Uhlenhuth, 
Assistant Professor Psychiatry at the 
Johns Hopkins Medical School, and 
three grandchildren. 



Mr. E. Chandler Newnam 

Mr. E. Chandler Newnam, LL.B. '18. 
of Baltimore, Maryland died suddenly 
November 10. He was the proprietor 
of a successful advertising business, and 
keenly interested in all sports. 



Dr. Ira Clinton Long 

Dr. Ira Clinton Long. Med. "23, More- 
head City, North Carolina, formerly of 
Goldsboro, North Carolina, died sud- 
denly at his home. He had been retired 
for five years. 

He was in general practice for sev- 
eral years, after which he was associated 
with Dr. John C. King, psychiatrist, in 
the operation of St. Alban's Sanatorium, 
Radford, Virginia. He served on the 
staff of the state hospital in Goldsboro 
from 1936 to 1956 and was superin- 
tendent his last 1 1 years there. 

(Continued on next page) 



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Dr. Arthur Lee Daughtridge 

Dr. Arthur Lee Daughtridge, a pioneer 
in the field of radiology and a prominent 
physician in Rocky Mount, N. C, for 
more than 30 years, died May 11. 

In addition to his widespread activity 
in heart, cancer, and tuberculosis work, 
Dr. Daughtridge was intensely interested 
in community and civic affairs. Accord- 
ing to one colleague he had ". . . made 
it a practice to go the extra mile in 
making unselfish contributions to his 
community and its people". 



Dr. Theresa Snaith 

Dr. Theresa O. Snaith, '23, first woman 
graduate of the University's Medical 
School, passed away on June 12 in the 
Ohio State University Hospital. 

Dr. Snaith was a prominent pedia- 
trician throughout central West Vir- 
ginia. She began her practice there in 
1931. She was on the Board of Direc- 
tors of the State Medical Association, 
and the Board of the Stonewall Jackson 
Memorial Hospital. She was also a di- 
rector of the State Public Health Com- 
mission. 



Dr. Louis H. Douglass 

Dr. Louis H. Douglass, M.D. 11, in- 
ternationally known obstetrician and 
surgeon died July 24 after a lengthy 
illness. He was 72. 

Dr. Douglass was a retired professor 
of obstetrics at the University of Mary- 
land's School of Medicine. He had 
gained fame for his work on the rhesus 
(RH) blood factor. 

Men and women who had studied 
medicine under the surgeon held him 
in such high esteem that they formed a 
Nationwide organization of obstetricians 
known as "the Dougtricians." 



Miss Elizabeth Aitkenhead 

Miss Elizabeth Aitkenhead, Supervisor 
of Surgical Nursing at University Hos- 
pital for 29 years, died June 4 following 
a long illness. She had retired in 1951. 

Miss Aitkenhead had been brought 
to University Hospital in 1922 to re- 
organize the operating room area and 
in her long service she gained the re- 
spect and confidence of all the surgeons 
she worked with. She was. according to 
Dr. George A. Yeager, Professor of 
Clinical Surgery at the University's 
School of Medicine, "an excellent ad- 
ministrator as well as a brilliant and 
effective teacher." 

She was born in Glasgow, Scotland, 
and came to the United States to attend 
the School of Nursing at Wooster Hos- 
pital in Wooster, Ohio. As a graduate 



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42 



the Maryland Magazine 



nurse she assisted Ohio surgeons in the 
performance of operations, which at 
that time took place in the patients' 
homes. 

Miss Aitkenhead won wide repute for 
her nursing, supervisory and teaching 
skills and was made an honorary mem- 
ber of the University's Nurses' Alumnae 
Association in 1951. 



Other Deaths 

Harry E. Anthony, M.D. 01, of Mo- 
ravia, New York. 

W. H. Baish, D.D.S. '09, of Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Morgan M. Buchner, LL.B. '30, of Bal- 
timore, Maryland. 

Carlton A. Davenport, M.D. '24, of 
Hertford, North Carolina. 

James Burgess Diggs, LL.B. 16, of Bal- 
timore, Maryland. 

L. Alan Dill, LL.B. '08, of Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Clara Herskowitz, Pharm., of Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Dewey Lynwood Fleshman, M.D. '23, 
of Bassett, Virginia. 

John H. Kearney, M.D. '97, of Fitch- 
burg, Massachusetts. 

Herbert C. Kinkaid, M.D. 10, of Ar- 
lington, Virginia. 

James M. Flippin, M.D. '84, of Pilot 
Mountain, North Carolina. 

George A. Matheke, M.D. '33, of New- 
ark, New Jersey. 

Harry Downman McCarty, M.D. '05, 
of Baltimore, Maryland. 

L. John Merritt, M.D. '97. of Walden, 
New York. 

Irving H. Mezer, LL.B. '11, 

Everet M. Pearcy, M.D., of Clarksburg, 
West Virginia. 

Albert Scagnetti, M.D. '24. of Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Hugh W. Smeltzer, M.D. '09, of Green- 
dale, Virginia. 

James L. Swank, M.D., of Las Vegas, 
Nevada. 

Jaroslav Jerry Toula, LL.B. '39, of Bal- 
timore, Maryland. 

W. Randolph Tucker, LL.B. '37, of 
Washington, D. C. 

William C. Williams, M.D. '17. of Hills- 
ville, Virginia. 

Robert Wriston, M.D. '05, of Beckley, 
West Virginia. 

Louis H. Douglass, M.D. 11. of Ac- 
comas, Virginia. 

Oscar George Carpenter, Agr. '15, of 
Plum Point, Maryland. 

Julia C. Foley, Nurs. '14, of Rockville, 
Maryland. 

Stella Ricketts, Nurs. '11, of Towson, 
Maryland. 

Mrs. Jane Davies Tall, Ed. '52, wife of 
Robert E. Tall, editor and publisher of 
Industrial Communications Magazine, 
died. She was 32. 

John S. Jacobsen, Agr. '37, former flor- 
ist at the Willard Hotel and an active 
club and civic worker. 



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Directory of Advertisers 



Acme I ron Works 29 

Alcazar 26 

American Disinfectant Co 43 

American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

Inside Front Cover 

Anchor Post Products Co., Inc 43 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., Inc 42 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn 37 

Asphalt Service Co.. Inc 34 

Atchison & Keller, Inc 38 

Baltimore Envelope Co 33 

Hard-Avon School 40 

Herrmann's Laundry 39 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc 42 

Edward Boker Frosted Foods, Inc 26 

Hon Ton Food Products 43 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 37 

Briggs & Company, Meat Products 42 

Thomas E. Carroll & Son 39 

I). Harry Chambers, Opticians 29 

Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Silver Spring.... 25 

Comad, Inc 28 

Cloverland Dairy 28 

Crusty Pie Co 34 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 30 

I). C. Ignition Headquarters, Inc 42 

Del Haven White House Motel 29 

The Diplomat Motor Hotel 35 

Domino Restaurant, Inc 42 

Economy Dental Laboratory 36 

Electronic Wholesalers, Inc 35 

Farmers Cooperative Assn 40 

J. H. Filbert Co 42 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn 36 

First National Bank of Baltimore 21 

John G. Fitzgerald, Plumbing and Heating. . . 38 

Franklin Uniform Co 37 

Fuller & d'Albert, Inc 40 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co 33 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 31 

A. Gude Sons Co. 22 

Hagerstown, Md., Clearing House 27 

Harvey Dairy 42 

Hearn-Kirkwood 32 

Hotel Harrington 36 

The House of Sound 38 

Huffer-Shinn Optical Co., Inc 40 

The In Town .Motor Hotels 26 

Johnston, Lemon & Co 35 

Frank B. Jones, Optician 38 

E, A. Kaestner Co 40 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc 43 

King Brothers, Inc., Printing , . 36 

E. II. Koester Bakery Co 29 



The Latrobe 43 

Lustine Chevrolet 39 

Maria's Restaurant 43 

-Martin Co. Baltimore 24 

Martin Company, Waterproofing 41 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 30 

Massey-Furguson, Inc 37 

Modern Machinists Co 41 

Morrison & Fifer, Chemists 31 

Murray- Baumgartner Co 30 

McCormick & Co., Inc Back Cover 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc 34 

Norman Motor Co 37 

North Washington Press, Inc 41 

Noxzema Chemical Co 43 

Occidental Restaurant 30 

Oles Envelope Corp 26 

Olney Inn 24 

( Ittenberg's Bakers, Inc. 36 

Palmer Ford, Inc 33 

Park Transfer Co 31 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 41 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co., Inc 36 

Sealtest Foods 39 

Sears Roebuck and Co 31 

Seidenspinner Realtor 41 

Semler-McFaddin Co 29 

The Shade Shop 33 

Shoreham Hotel 32 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 39 

Southcomb Hats 32 

Strayer College 41 

Student's Supply Store 26 

Suburban Trust Co 30 

Sweetheart Bread 41 

The Tilghman Packing Co 38 

Thomsson Steel Co., Inc 31 

Town Hall Tavern 41 

Trailways 20 

Vermont Federal Savings & Loan Assn 34 

Wallop & Son, Insurance 41 

Washington Gas Light Company 23 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange, Inc. 40 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 27 

Perry O. Wilkinson, Insurance 43 

Williams Construction Co., Inc 43 

J. McKenny Willis & Son, Inc 33 

Winslow Paints 40 

York Building Products Co., Inc 38 

York Wholesalers, Inc 31 

Duke Zeihert's Restaurant 32 



44 



the Maryland Magazine 



Preparations have been made to accommodate several 
thousand alumni for the annual HOMECOMING cele- 
bration, November 4, at College Park. 

On the field to face the Terrapins will be a powerful 
Penn State. Pre-season predictions call this team the po- 
tential champion of the East. They whipped us 28-9 last 
year. This year the Nittany Lions will be in for some 
painful surprises. With the enthusiastic interest and par- 
ticipation of Alumni in HOMECOMING the Terps may 
well spring one of the big surprises of the 1961 season. 

Tickets are $4.00 and may be obtained through Box 
295, College Park, Maryland. For those desiring infor- 
mation on other ticket sale points in Baltimore and Wash- 
ington call WArfield 7-2807. Game time is 2:00 p.m. 

Details concerning HOMECOMING will be sent soon 
to the Alumni mailing list. Highlights which have been 
planned include a buffet luncheon in the Dining Hall 
for $ 1 .00; a massive Float Parade, climaxed by the crown- 
ing of the HOMECOMING Queen just prior to game 
time; and an elaborate half-time show featuring the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Marching Band. House decorations 
will be as colorful as ever and you are invited to tour 
the campus and its environs at your leisure. 

Immediately following the game a coffee hour will be 
held in the Student Union Building, adjacent to the 
Stadium. 

The traditional HOMECOMING Dance will be in the 
Armory as a fitting close for the many who will be COM- 
ING HOME for HOMECOMING. 



PLAN NOW 

TO ATTEND 

THE 1961 

HOMECOMING 

CELEBRATION 

NOV. 4 

AT 

COLLEGE PARK 








WORLD'S 

LEADING 

Spice and Extract 

House 



O ID 

a p 



MARYLAND HOSPITALITY 

When playing hosts to guests from out of town, Baltimoreans are now 
frequently including a visit to McCormick's Friendship Court in their tour 
of picturesque and historic sites. Few places afford a more sweeping view 
of the Baltimore harbor as it stretches toward storied Fort McHenry. 

McCormick & Company's hostesses, all well versed in the historical 
and romantic lore of the spice and tea trade, are ever ready in Friendship 
Court to assist yon in providing a friendly welcome to Baltimore. Also 
as part ol McCormick hospitality, a refreshing cup of tea or coffee awaits 
guests in Ye Olde Tea House. 



McCORMICK & CO., INC.— "77ie House of Flavor 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



magazine 




Volume XXXIII Number Six • November-December 1961 



Honors Convocation Recognizes Achievement 



A Winning Homecomim. 



At Bell Telephone Laboratories, mathematician Sidney Darlington 
has contributed notably in developing the art of circuit analysis. 




. . . It is essentially a thing of the mind for it works through concepts, symbols and 
relationships . . .it helps man to analyze and synthesize the complex phenomena of the 
universe and himself ...it ivorks in many ways to advance electrical communications: 



IT IS CALLED MATHEMATICS 

At Bell Telephone Laboratories, mathematics 
works powerfully to solve problems involving com- 
plex data. Intriguingly, too, the mathematical ap- 
proach: led to the invention of the electric wave 
fdter . . . disclosed a kind of wave transmission 
which may some day carry huge amounts of infor- 
mation in waveguide systems . . . foretold the feasi- 
bility of modern quality control . . . led to a scientific 



technique for determining how many circuits must 
be provided for good service without having costly 
equipment lie idle. 

For each creative task, Bell Laboratories utilizes 
whatever serves best — mathematical analysis, labora- 
tory experimentation, simulation with electronic com- 
puters. Together they assure the economical advance- 
ment of all Bell System communications services. 



M BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 



the 




m.i^aziiic 



IVtairylanci 




Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXIII Number G 

The Cover: This outstanding view of a portion of the College Park 

campus was photographed in November by Al Danegger, Head of the 
University Photographic Laboratory. He recorded it from the vantage ol 

a Maryland State Police helicopter which swung uproariously from building 
to building permitting a perspective ol' the campus never before achieved. 
Mr. Danegger used a Speed Graphic with a "G" filter. His shutter speed 
was 250th of a second. His shutter opening was I. II. His film was Royal 
Pan. To minimize the vibration of the vehicle. Mr. Danegger sat on the 
edge of his seat, using his body as a shock absorber. Time of exposure 
was 10:58 a.m. 



Z* The Alumni Diary 

D Alumni and Campus Notes 

J Honors Convocation Recognizes Achievement 



/ A Winning Homecoming 
y Maryland Books and Authors 
W) Terps Open Basketball Season 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

C. E. TUTTLE, Assistant Treasurer 
RICHARD W. CASE 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C.WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 

DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. MCCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICF. OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
DR. REGINALD V. TRUITT, '14, President 
DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '11, Vice-President 
HARRY HASSLINGER, '33, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. EDNA L. MESSERSCHM IDT .Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



ADVERTISING DIRECTORS 
MRS. H. B. GILLESPIE 
RICHARD F. ROSS 

6451 Blenheim Road 

Baltimore 12, Md. 

DR 7-7692 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March3, 1879. -$3.00 per year-Fifty cents the copy-Member of American Alumni Council. 



The General Alumni Council 

school and college 
represent a ti ves : 

AGRICULTURE 

H. M. Carroll, '20 
Paul M. Galbreath, '39 
Abram Z. Gottwals, '38 

ARTS & SCIENCES 

Richard Bourne, '57 
Joseph M. Mathias, '35 
Dr. Reginald V. Truitt, '14 

BUSINESS * PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas E. Bourne, Jr., '43 
Egbert F. Tingley, '27 
Chester W. Tawney, '31 

DENTISTRY 

Dr. Charles E. Broadrup, '32 

Dr. Harry Levin, '26 

Dr. Edward D. Stone, '25 

EDUCATION 

Edward S. Beach, Jr., '49 

Harry Hasslinger, '33 

Miss Dorothy L. Ordwein, '35 

ENGINEERING 

Emmett Loane, '29 
Tracy C. Coleman, '35 
Ben Dyer, '31 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '34 
Mrs. Ruth T. Clarke, '42 
Mrs. Mary Ward Davis, '55 



Emory H. Niles, '17 

Hon. W. Albert Menchine, '29 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., '35 
Dr. Arthur G. Siwinski, '48 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 

NURSING 

Mrs. E. Elizabeth R. Hipp, '29 

Mrs. Norma S. Long, '49 

Mrs. Kathryn Prokop Donnelly, '48 

PHARMACY 



Hyman Davidov, '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen, '25 
Frank J. Slama, '24 



EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS: 



Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Director & Executive Secretary 
Victor Holm, '57 

Field Secretary 
Mrs. Elizabeth Rohr Singleton 

Nurs., '47; Edu., '51 
Harry A. Boswell, Jr., Past President 
Frank Block, '24, Past President 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19. Past President 



ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES: 
Baltimore — Mrs. Ethel M. Troy, '17 
Frederick County — 

Nelson R. Bohn, '51 
"M" Club — George Knepley, '38 
Montgomery County — 

Robert W. Beall, '31 
New York— Harold McGay, '50 
Prince Georges County — 

Dr. John W. Cronin, '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, '19 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, '26 
Washington County — 

Carson S. Couchman, '51 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



FIFTEEN YEARS IS A LONG TIME IF YOU ARE LOOKING FORWARD, AND SUCH A 
short time when you have passed in review. One hundred years into the 
future is almost impossible to comprehend, while a hundred years of history is 
but a fraction of the past. The end is but a beginning, and the beginning an end. 

Early in 1947, we began our assignment as your Alumni Secretary. Fifteen 
years have passed. Now, with careful direction from an Alumni Council repre- 
senting some 50,000 University of Maryland Alumni, we are reviewing the past 
and searching the future for objectives, projects, and programs keyed to "What is 
best for the University of Maryland." Herein lies the reference to fifteen years. 

At the same time, the University, as one of 68 Land-Grant Colleges, observes 
the 100th Anniversary of an Act which in 1862 produced many significant educa- 
tional, industrial, scientific and social advancements. These institutions, represent- 
ing less than 4 percent of the Nation's colleges, enroll about 20 percent of the 
Nation's undergraduate students, and grant nearly 40 percent of all doctoral 
degrees in every field of study. Three distinctive programs have marked Land- 
Grant Colleges: instruction, research, and extension. The goal: to provide a 
balance between practical education and the traditional, classical education. 
These were combined in a curriculum best suited to meet the needs of a changing 
society. 

Looking toward this same objective, the Alumni Council is reaching into the 
area of the exceptional student, University growth, and responsibility to the 
majority. 

There are many who feel the minds and actions of 1 percent of the world's 
population will determine the future course of history and perhaps the survival of 
man. A speaker recently said that extinction came to the giants of prehistoric 
days, the dinosaur and the dinotherium, because they grew too heavy to sustain 
their own bodies, or because the protective iron-like scales weighted them down. 
The very factors of size and protective covering which had provided such great 
protection and domination became the very cause of their destruction. 

There are present-day concerns that man's intelligence, which has carried 
him to such great heights, to so many revelations and to a new level of comfort, 
if uncontrolled, will destroy him. The only possible way to avoid such a fate is to 
guarantee that the intellect of man in the foreseeable future is given every oppor- 
tunity for sensible, sensitive and challenging development. 

Others of our number are concerned about the great mass, the so-called aver- 
age, and their opportunities to render maximum service to a deserving and needy 
civilization. This is the basic responsibility of the Land-Grant College "Where 
the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, 
and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning, as are related 
to agriculture and the mechanic arts ... to promote the liberal and practical 
education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions in life." 

The third area of concern is the "late starter." What makes some smolder 
before they catch fire? The recent passing of "Mr. Sam" Rayburn, the eighth 
child of a family of eleven belonging to an impoverished southern share-cropper, 
brought this fact into sharp focus. Why did millions stand a death watch and 
mourn his departure when so many other lives drifted by almost unnoticed in 
the passing parade? Who really cares what makes a man great, as long as we can 
be certain that those with potential are granted opportunity. Such has been and 
will continue to be one of the basic reasons for a University of Maryland. 



Sincerely, 




tfhtC_^^ 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



the Maryland Magazine 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



DECEMBER 

2 University Commuters Club Party 
University Theater, Romanoff and 
Juliet 

S.U. Cultural Series: 
Twenty Years — What Have We 
Learned? 

S.U. Stairway to the Stars Dance 
AWS Christmas Pageant 
Christmas Recess Begins 



5-9 



15 
19 
20 



JANUARY 

3 Christmas Recess Ends 
9 Placement Briefing Session 
1 1 S.U. Classical Film: 
Foreign Correspondent 

16 Winter Concert, Band 

17 S.U. Cultural Series: 

It Was This Way, Sports 
Orioles 

18 National Symphony 

24 Pre-Examination Study Day 
25-3 1 Fall Semester Examinations 



FEBRUARY 

5-9 Spring Semester Registration 
S.U. Classical Film Scries: 
Four Bags Full 
Instructions Begin 
Washington's Birthday. Holiday 
S.U. Cultural Series: 
The Population Explosion 



8 



24 
28 



Ed. Note: Sports Schedules Are 
Pubi [shed In The Section "Univer- 
sity Sports" Page Ten. 



University Receives the Tydings Papers 



ON NOVEMBER 10, MRS. MILLARD E. TYDINGS PRESENTED 
the University of Maryland with personal papers and 
books belonging to her husband, the late Senator Millard E. 
Tydings. These materials are to be added to the library 
collection and housed in the Maryland and Rare Books De- 
partment of the McKeldin Library. 

Materials presented to the library include: 

— The correspondence of the 1950 campaign. 

— Two files of personal correspondence of the 

Senator. 
— Copies of speeches for radio broadcasts. 
— Copies of some of the bills introduced into the 

Senate by the Senator. 
— Political and personal scrapbooks, 1919-1950, 
made up of clippings from papers over the coun- 
try. One entire scrapbook is made up of clip- 
pings on the McCarthy investigation. 
— Photographs of the Senator used in political cam- 
paigns. 
— Questionnaires sent to the counties in Maryland 
to determine the political pulse of these areas dur- 
ing campaigns. 
— Lists of campaign contributions. 
— Copies of articles written by the Senator for 

magazines. 
— Four phonograph records made by the Senator. 



In addition to these personal effects, Mrs. Tydings also 
presented to the library a number of issues of The Congres- 
sional Record. The Congressional Directory (Congressman's 
Edition), and The Maryland Manna!. These volumes are to 
be used to fill in files in the library collection. 

Also included in the gift were numerous manuals, hand- 
books, code books, etc., used by officers during World War I, 
and which had belonged to the Senator. These items will 
be of interest to students working in the World War I period. 

As the Senator was one of the public figures who was car- 
tooned frequently, Mrs. Tydings, who owns a collection of 
the cartoons, lent them to the library for an exhibit. They 
were used as a part of an exhibit placed in the McKeldin 
Library at the time of the presentation of the materials. There 
were 19 display cases filled with examples of the scrapbooks. 
letters and books, plus the cartoons. 

The papers, now in possession of the library, were used 
during the past year by Myron Scholnick. a graduate in the 
History Department at the University of Maryland, who 
wrote a thesis on the 1938 campaign of Senator Tydings. 
The late Senator gave Mr. Scholnick permission to use his 
papers. The thesis will soon be added to the library's collec- 
tion. 

With these papers now in one location, it is hoped that 
studies relative to the Senator will be undertaken by graduate 
students at the University and by scholars from other parts of 
the country. 



November-December, 1961 



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Memorial Book Service 

•'Man rises to the greatest heights 
when, through tears, heartache and 
sacrifice, he gives the last ounce of de- 
votion. This unselfish hour is man's 
finest." 

These were words spoken by The 
Rev. Cecil Loy Propst at the Memorial 
Book Service commemorating Univer- 
sity alumni who gave their lives when 
their nation was engaged in armed 
conflict. The service was convened 
November 19 in the Memorial Chapel, 
College Park. 

"We must be living memorials," Rev. 
Propst said, "to the memory for which 
they died. Liberty is more precious 
than life itself, hope is man's daily 
hread. We cannot let our future be 
purchased at the price of slavery to 
any ideology, personality cult or philos- 
ophy of expediency. The moral, phys- 
ical and spiritual fiber of our coun- 
try must be strengthened to meet the 
testing, probing days ahead. To us is 
entrusted the task of serving humanity. 

"Proudly we place in memory this 
scroll of honored Alumni. 'Devoted to 
Duty' may well rest in hallowed sym- 
bolism over it — The essence of Man's 
Finest Hour, the Motivation for Man's 
Future Hope." 

The beautifully illustrated Memorial 
Book completes the intent declared in 
the dedication of the Chapel in 1952 
by establishing a permanent record of 
University of Maryland Alumni who 
have given their lives. The Student 
Government Association provided the 
funds for the production of the Book. 

The Memorial Book will rest in a 
case in the foyer of the Chapel. A 
photostatic copy will be available along 
with the original for public inspection. 

Participating in the Memorial Book 
Service were President Elkins, Father 



Merrill Stevens, Episcopal Chaplain, 
Rabbi Meyer Greenberg, Jewish Chap- 
lain, and Father William Tepe, Roman 
Catholic Chaplain. Providing musical 
selections were Charlton Meyer, or- 
ganist, and the Chapel Choir, Fague 
Springmann, Director. 



1960 Alumnus is Named 
Director of University Fund 

Tom Baker has been appointed Direc- 
tor of the Greater University of Mary- 
land Fund it was announced by Mr. 
A. E. Cormeny, Assistant to the Presi- 
dent for Endowment and Development. 
Mrs. Paula Willis was named Coordi- 
nator. 

Following a year when the Fund went 
over the half-million dollar mark for a 
three-year period, Mr. Baker and Mrs. 
Willis will launch a team effort con- 
tacting Maryland alumni to promote 
Fund objectives for 1961-62. 

A 1960 graduate of the University in 
public relations, Mr. Baker replaces 
Mr. George P. Giavasis, who became 
a partner in a Washington public rela- 
tions firm. 

Formerly, Mr. Baker was Assistant 
Director of the National Capital Area 
Chapter of The National Foundation, 
the March of Dimes. He also served 
four years in the Air Force. Mr. Baker 
lives in Hyattsville with his wife, the 
former Ann Marie Perry, a 1959 
graduate of the University, and one son. 

Mrs. Willis, Coordinator of the Fund, 
has been associated with the office 
since 1958. She lives in Ashton. 



Dean Bamford is Officer 
of Southern College Group 

Dean Ronald Bamford of the Gradu- 
ate School, University of Maryland, has 
been named Vice-President of the 
Southern Association of Land-Grant 
Colleges and State Universities. The 
Association's new President is Ralph B. 
Draughon of Auburn University, who 
succeeds President Frank G. Dickey of 
University of Kentucky. Dean Virgil 
Adkisson of the Graduate School, Uni- 
versity of Arkansas, was re-elected 
Secretary-Treasurer. Executive Com- 
mittee members are President R. C. 
Edwards, Clemson; Dean Walter J. 
Peterson, University of Kentucky, and 
President Dickey. 



Appalachian Research 
Center Opened in 
Cumberland County 

A new branch center of the Natural 
Resources Institute of the University, 
has been established at LaVale in Cum- 
berland County. 

The full staff of the center, which is 
officially named the Appalachian Re- 
search Center, includes a wildlife 
biologist, a forester, a fishery biologist, 
a conservation education man, and a 
secretary. 

The center has been set up to study, 
research, and convey knowledge of the 
potentialities of the natural resources 
of Western Maryland. It will be pri- 
marily concerned, as is the Institute 
itself, with the prevention of waste of 
Maryland's natural resources by mis- 
handling. 

Studies will be conducted on increas- 
ing the productivity and use of forest 
lands, providing better fishing in the 
area, and in the encouragement of 
various wild game species. 

Studies may also be undertaken at a 
later date in stream pollution and bet- 
ter utilization of the area's mineral re- 
sources. 

Construction Started on 
Cumberland Hall 

Construction has begun on Cumberland 
Hall, a new men's dormitory on the 
College Park campus, and a west din- 
ing room on the second campus dining 
hall. 

Cumberland Hall, which will house 
548 men when completed in the fall 
of 1962, will complete a five dormitory 
and dining hall complex on the north 
side of the campus. The new dormi- 
tory will face Centreville Hall, a 500- 
unit women's dormitory, completed this 
fall. 

Other new dormitories completed this 
fall were Cambridge Hall for 250 men, 
and Bel Air and Chestertown Halls for 
125 men each. 

The second campus dining hall, 
which now is providing food service 
to students in the new dormitories, 
also will serve Cumberland Hall stu- 
dents when construction is completed. 

Cumberland Hall, designed by Wal- 
ton and Madden, Architects, of Mt. 
Rainier, and the west dining room, 
designed by Johannes and Murray, 
architects, of Silver Spring, are being 
erected by the George Hyman Company, 
of Washington, at a cost of $2,017,000. 
(Continued on page 1 1 ) 



the Maryland Magazine 




Honors Convocation Recognizes 
Alumni. Student Achievement 



THREE MARYLAND ALUMNI WERE THE RECIPIENTS 
of Distinguished Service Awards at the Uni- 
versity's second annual Honors Convocation, 
November 3. They were Dr. E. Paul Knotts, of 
Denton; Major General Lindsay McDonald Silvester, of 
Washington, D.C.; and Dr. George H. Yeager, of Balti- 
more. 

In recognition of their achievement as honor students, 
the University presented Certificates of Distinguished 
Scholarship to 433 students currently enrolled or who 
have been graduated in the academic year 1960-61. 

The Convocation, convened on the eve of Homecoming, 
also celebrated the one-hundredth anniversary of the pas- 
sage of the Morrill Act, establishing the land-grant sys- 
tem of colleges and universities in the United States. 
As a land-grant institution, the University of Maryland, 



along with many of its sister universities, is joining in the 
national celebration, 1961-1962. commemorating a cen- 
tury of democratic opportunity in higher education. 

The Convocation, convened in the Reckord Armory, 
was attended by more than 1,500 students, faculty, family 
and friends. 

Recipients of Distinguished Service Awards were: 

Dr. George H. Yeager, physician, medical adminis- 
trator, leader in solving many of the problems of medical 
care in the State, and a 1929 graduate of the University's 
School of Medicine. Dr. Yeager received the Legion of 
Merit for his services during World War II, served as 
President of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of 
Maryland, and Chairman of the Committee oi\ Medical 
Care of the State Planning Commission. 



November-December, 1961 




General Lindsay McDonald Silvester (Ret.), 
patriot, military leader in two World Wars, and dis- 
tinguished graduate of 1911. General Silvester's military 
career includes achievements at home and overseas: 
infantry service in Hawaii, 1912 to 1915; the Mexican 
Punitive Expedition in 1916; with the 3rd Division, AEF, 
in World War I; commander of the famed Seventh 
Armored Division in France and Holland during World 
War II; commander who organized and trained the Na- 
tion's first tank group; and commander who covered 400 
miles of enemy-held territory in 15 days leading to the 
capture of Verdun in World War 11. Among his decora- 
tions are the Distinguished Service Cross, the Purple 
Heart, the Silver Star and the French Croix de Guerre 
in both wars. 

Dr. E. Paul Knotts, practitioner of the healing arts, 
1920 graduate of the University, School of Medicine, 
public benefactor and friend of education, has served 
Maryland as a member of Interracial Committee for the 
State of Maryland, Governor's Commission abolishing 
almshouses and establishing hospitals for the chronically 
ill, and as a member of the Board of Regents of the 
University of Maryland from 1942 to 1953. In 1951, 
Dr. Knotts was named "General Practitioner of the Year" 
by the Maryland Academy of General Practice. 



T, 



HE principal address was presented by dr. 
Eric A. Walker, President of Pennsylvania State University. 
In his address President Walker said, "One hundred 
years ago this next July, . . . Abraham Lincoln signed into 
law the Morrill Land-Grant Act. And, quite possibly, 
it was the greatest single piece of legislation ever passed 
by a United States Congress." 

"What, exactly," he asked, "was the Morrill Act? . . . 
it was an act designed to encourage the establishment of 



at least one college in each state by granting to the state 
30,000 acres of Federal land, or its equivalent in script, 
for each congressman from the state. This land or script 
was to be sold to provide a permanent endowment for 
the colleges established under its terms and conditions." 

"The colleges and universities in America," President 
Walker pointed out, "at that time were direct transplants 
of British institutions. The rigidly prescribed curriculum 
they offered was composed largely of the study of the 
classics, and it was possible to obtain a collegiate prepara- 
tion for only four professions — law, medicine, theology, 
and teaching." 

"Today there are 68 land-grant institutions. . . . These 
universities enroll well over a half million students, or 
more than one out of every five college students in the 
entire country. They grant 40 percent of all the doctor's 
degrees in all subjects; about half of all those granted in 
the sciences, engineering, and the health professions; 
and practically all those in agriculture." 

President Walker went on to say, "But the full im- 
portance of this act and of these institutions cannot really 
be measured in terms such as these. This importance can 
really be measured only in terms of the effect these univer- 
sities and the philosophy that has guided them have had 
on American higher education" 

"The sort of life we want, then, boils down to what sort 
of people we are. A wise and virtuous people will estab- 
lish wise and virtuous goals for themselves, but a selfish 
and foolish people will establish selfish and foolish goals." 

"Each of you," said President Walker, "being honored 
at this convocation . . . has proved that you possess extra- 
ordinary abilities and capacities. And each of you has 
been granted unusual opportunities to develop those abili- 
ties and capacities. For this combination, society has a 
right to expect a great deal. And each of you have the 
responsibility of making certain that society actually does 
get what it expects." 

"If you accept this responsibility," continued President 
Walker, "you will become leaders in your communities, 
in your state, and in your country. You have already 
demonstrated your potential and your promise for this. 
In realizing this potential, face up to your responsibilities 
courageously but humbly. Exercise your leadership 
firmly but not arrogantly. Temper your intelligence with 
wisdom and your knowledge with tolerance. Above all 
else, base your decisions and your judgments on a sense 
of values that places the man before the job, the larger 
good before the selfish interests, your self-respect before 
material expediency." 

"This is the essence of the dreams and the hopes of 
those who guided the Land-Grant Act into law a century 
ago," concluded President Walker. 

Following the presentation of the Distinguished Service 
Awards, deans of the colleges read the names of the stu- 
dents in their college receiving a 3.5 or better average 
for the last semester. 

After the invocation by Reverend Merrill A. Stevens, 
Episcopalian Chaplain, the combined University Women's 
Chorus and Men's Glee Club sang the "Morpheus" and 
"Paris." "Psalm One Hundred Fifty" and "Seven-Fold 
Amen" were also presented by the choir. 

Reverend Theodore Casper, Lutheran Chaplain, gave 
the benediction. Refreshments were served following the 
convocation and award recipients and members of the 
audience were given an opportunity to meet the members 
of the Board of Regents, President Elkins, President 
Walker, and honored guests. 



the Maryland Magazine 



-t- 
1 V 




A Winning Homecoming 



HUNDREDS OF ALUMNI CELEBRATED PERHAPS THE MOST 
exciting and colorful Homecoming in the Univer- 
sity's history. Returning alumni saw a greatly ex- 
panded campus, populated by the largest student body (15,- 
394) in the University's history. They also saw the Univer- 

November-December, 1961 



sity's young football team subdue Perm State, the top foot- 
ball team in the East, by a score of 21-17. 

Of those alumni who strolled around the campus, perhaps 
the person who saw the changing scene in the truest per- 
spective was Roland I.. Harrison. College o\ Agriculture. 




Class of 1895. Mr. Harrison played on Maryland's first 
football team and has returned many times to College Park 
to witness new developments on the campus and to watch 
the Terrapins contest with other universities on the athletic 
field. 

Others from the same era who honored their Alma Mater 
by their return were Dr. Edgar B. Friedenwald, School of 
Medicine, Class of 1903, and Thomas B. Mullendore, College 
of Arts and Sciences, Class of 1904, who travelled from 
Buffalo, New York to be present. 

For some, the day was not a complete success. Penn State 
alumni and supporters saw their bid for victory frustrated by 
fine offensive play and a magnificent Maryland goal-line 
stand. The overflow crowd of 39,000 received as much ex- 
citement and pleasure in the two and a half hours it took 
Maryland to beat Penn State as they would normally absorb 
in a week. For Maryland alumni, it was a dream game; 
tough all the way and ending in victory. 

Students spent much of the night before in preparation of 
house decorations, floats and other attractions to make Home- 
coming a real celebration for alumni. In the morning, im- 
pressed alumni saw first the extensive house decorations, 
next some of the campus growth and the ever expanding 
physical plant, and paused for a buffet luncheon in the 
familiar setting of the University Dining Hall. Following 
lunch, where some 500 paths crossed, and old friendships 
were renewed, markers directed the returning alumni to 
Byrd Stadium. 

Pre-game ceremonies included the most elaborate float 
parade of the decade, and the crowning of the Homecoming 
Queen. The theme of the 1961 Homecoming was "Maryland 
Mirror" in honor of the Centennial Celebration of the 
Morrill Act of 1862 which established the 68 Land Grant 
Colleges, of which the University of Maryland is one. Many 
almost forgotten campus days were recalled by the floats 
and house decorations and by the commentary which ac- 
companied the exceptional performance of our Marching 
Band. 

The Cole Activities Building was the setting for a post- 
game reception and victory celebration. Alumni crowded 
in to enjoy light refreshments and a warm handshake from 
those whom they had not seen for a number of years. Of 
course, the Homecoming dance was held in the Armory, 
but it drew only a few of the younger alumni whose youth 
provided a sufficient reserve to permit them to enjoy the last 
glimpse of a Homecoming which proved to be one of the 
best packages ever untied by those who found it possible to 
"come home to Homecoming." 

Crowned Homecoming Queen was blonde-haired, blue- 
eyed Jean Weaver, Delta Delta Delta. Runners up were Ruth 
Hatfield, Anne Arundel Hall, first; Elaine Ricca, Kappa Delta, 
second; Karen Mooney, Commuters Club, third, and Lynn 
Berkis, Phi Sigma Sigma, fourth. 

In the float parade, Zeta Beta Tau took top honors with 
the theme "Zeta Beta Tau Presents Bowl Time Again." Second 
place went to Sigma Alpha Mu which float depicted the 
Terps at the Orange Bowl in Florida. Garrett Hall reflected 
the Maryland Mirrors theme with their first place winning 
float for the men's dorms, "154 Years of Progress." "Hold that 
Lion" took second place, representing Belair Hall. 

With a Terrapin fortune teller looking forward to the end 
of a rainbow, Phil Sigma Sigma won first place in the sorority 
house decoration division. Sigma Kappa received second 
honors with the theme, "Mirror, Mirror on the Wall." 

In the women's dorms division, Dorchester scored first with 
"Maryland Strikes at a Bowl." "Testudo Travels in 30 Years" 
was the theme for Montgomery Hall, second place winner. 



8 



the Maryland Magazine 




Maryland Books and Authors 

by Mrs. Harold Hayes, 
Head, Maryland Room, McKeldin Library 



PROFESSOR GEORGE F. CORCORAN, CHAIRMAN OF THE 
University's Department of Electrical Engineering, 
has been named the 1961 recipient of the Medal in 
Electrical Engineering Education by the American In- 
stitute of Electrical Engineers. 

Established by the Institute in 1956, the award is made 
annually to a teacher of electrical engineering based upon 
his excellence in teaching, his ability to inspire students to 
give higher achievements, and his contributions to the teach- 
ing of electrical engineering by textbooks and by writings 
on engineering education. 

Other considerations for the award include participation 
in the work of the professional and educational societies and 
contributions to teaching and the profession through research, 
engineering achievements and technical papers. 

Professor Corcoran, a native of Redfield, South Dakota, 
has been Chairman of the University's Department of Elec- 
trical Engineering since 1941. 

He received a bachelor of science degree in 1923 from 
South Dakota State College and a master of science degree 
in 1926 from the University of Minnesota. 

He was a Teaching Fellow in electrical engineering at the 
University of Minnesota in 1925, an Instructor at Kansas 



State College in 1927, and Associate Professor and Profes- 
sor at the State University of Iowa between 193 1 and 1941. 

As a student, teacher and professional engineer. Professor 
Corcoran has been affiliated with Sigma Alpha Epsilon, social 
fraternity; Eta Kappa Nu. Sigma Tau. Tau Beta Pi. Phi 
Kappa Phi and Sigma Xi. honorary societies; and American 
Society for Engineering Education. American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers. Institute of Radio Engineers and Ameri- 
can Association of University Professors, professional so- 
cieties. 

He is a registered professional engineer and has served as 
a consultant to industry, to state and Federal agencies. 

Professor Corcoran's reputation as an author is world- 
wide. Among his books are: Introduction to Electrical 
Transients (with E. B. Kurtz) 1935: Alternating Current 
Circuits (with R. M. Kerchner) 1937. (4th edition I960); 
Basic Electrical Engineering, 1949; Electrical Communica- 
tions Experiments (with H. R. Reed and T. C. G. Wagner) 
1952: Electronics (with H. YV. Price) 1954: and Introductory 
Electrical Engineering (with H. R. Reed) 1957. 

A number of these books have been translated into Spanish 
and Portuguese. 



November-December, 1961 



Terps Open Basketball Season 



BUD MILLIKAN BEGAN HIS TWELFTH YEAR AS HEAD COACH 
of the Terrapins, December 2 when Maryland opened 
the 1961-62 Basketball Season with Penn State at State Col- 
lege, Pa. His eleven year record reads 173 victories against 
99 losses. 

The Terrapins had a 14-12 record last year with a 6-8 
Atlantic Coast Conference reading. In the Atlantic Coast 
Conference tournament they lost in the semi-finals to cham- 
pion Wake Forest after winning the first round game from 
Clemson. 

Two lettermen are gone from the 1960-61 team. The big 
loss was Bob McDonald, 6-7 forward who was the Terps' 
leading scorer and rebounder. Also graduated is 6-10 center 
Bob Wilson. Their loss also represents the loss of important 



1961-62 


1961-62 


Varsity Wrestling 


Varsity Swimming 


December 9 North Carolina 
State — Home 


December 2 North Carolina 




State — Home 


15 Oklahoma — 




Home 


4 American Univer- 




sity — Home 


January 6 Army — 




at W est Point 


16 Virginia — Home 


13 Penn State — Home 


January 13 Duke — Home 


20 Navy— 

at Annapolis 


1 7 Navy — 

at Annapolis 


February 12 Pittsburgh — 


20 Pittsburgh— 




at Pittsburgh 


16 Virginia Military 




Institute — 


February 1 Wake Forest — 


at Lexington 


at Winston-Salem 


17 Virginia — 


2 Clemson — 


at Charlottesville 


at Clemson 


20 Duke — Home 


9 North Carolina — 


24 North Carolina — 


Home 


Home 






12 Washington & 


March 2 Atlantic Coast 


Lee — Home 


3 Conference Tour- 


16 V.M.I.— Home 


nament— 




at Raleigh, N.C. 


22-23-24 Atlantic Coast 


March 22 NCAA Tourna- 


Conference Cham- 




pionships — at 


23 ment — 


Raleigh, N.C. 


24 at Stillwater, Okla. 





Head Coach: William "Sully" 
Krouse; 16th season as coach. 
Co-Captains: Eugene Kerin (ACC 
OSW 1960 and 1961, ACC 
Champ 1960-61) and Pat Varre 
(ACC champion 1960 and 1961). 
1960-61 Overall Record: won 6, 
lost 2. 

ACC Record: won 4, lost 0. 
Coach Krouse's 15-Year Record: 
won 81, lost 36, tied 2. 
8-Year ACC Record: won 38, lost 
0, tied 0. 

ACC champions eight consecutive 
years and in 1961 won all 10 in- 
dividual titles. 



Head Coach: Bill Campbell 
(Springfield, '53); five year record 
at Maryland, won 41, lost 19. 
Atlantic Coast Conference Cham- 
pions 1959-60. Shared Title in 
1960-61. 



1962 

Indoor Track 



February 1 7 



Navy — 

at Annapolis- 



height to the Terp squad. McDonald had a 13.4 scoring 
average and grabbed eleven rebounds a game. 

Returning are seven lettermen, four seniors and three jun- 
iors. They include seniors Bruce Kelleher, 6-2, Wilmington, 
Del.; Paul Jelus, 6-2, Camden, N.J.; Mike Nofsinger, 5-9, 
Westernport, Md.; and Ted Marshall, 6-7, Johnstown, Pa. 
A trio of standout juniors return in 6-7 Jerry Greenspan, 
Newark, N.J.; Bob Eicher, 6-2, Greensburg, Pa.; and Bill 
Stasiulatis, 6-3, Bayonne, N.J. Connie Carpenter, a 6-4 jun- 
ior from Norwalk, Conn., returns, although not a letterman 
as a sophomore. Missing will be 6-1 Dave Schroeder, Media, 
Pa. Millikan had counted on Schroeder for his senior year 
but Shroeder broke his leg in an auto accident this summer 
and will not play. 

The Terrapins have some outstanding height coming up in 
6-7 Joe Barton, Beaverdale, Pa., and 6-9 Scott Ferguson is a 
fine looking prospect up from the freshman team. He had a 
14.5 scoring average for the Terp frosh. 

Kelleher and Jelus have been varsity standouts and will 
be counted on to lead the young Terrapins. Kelleher brings 
an 11.9 scoring mark back with Jelus having an eight point 
average. With Kelleher and Jelus, Millikan can count on 
some top performance and experience from his fine soph trio 
of last year, Eicher, Stasiulatis, and Greenspan. They were 
starters for Millikan last season and are expected to give the 
Terrapins the steady experience the Terps will need. With 
Greenspan, the Terps have one of the best big men in the 
league. The Terps were hurt last season after he played only 
the first half of the season. He had been the leading scorer 
and leading rebounder in the eleven games he started. He is 
the best rebounder Maryland has had in a long time and has 
excellent scoring potential. Millikan is counting on Greenspan 
to give the Terps the big spark they will need. Eicher is 
tabbed by Millikan as one of the finest basketball players 
he has seen and coached. He finished with a 10.2 average 
last year and also is considered the top defensive player on 
the team. In Stasiulatis, the Terps have another outstanding 
performer as a junior. Stasiulatis is a good scorer and re- 
bounder and can give a top defensive game. He was second 
to McDonald with an 11.2 mark. 

The Terps could get a big assist from Barton and Ferguson. 
With their size and strength, Millikan says he will work extra 
hard with them in hopes they can contribute the much needed 
help in the height department. Both are excellent prospects 
for the future. 

The Schedule: Dec. 2, Penn State, away; 6, Georgetown, 
home; 12, North Carolina State, home; 15, Minnesota, home; 
16, Wake Forest, home; 18, Virginia, away; 29-30 Sugar 
Bowl Tournament, New Orleans, away. 

Jan. 3: George Washington, away; 6, South Carolina, 
home; 10, Georgetown, away; 13, Duke, away; 16, George 
Washington, home; 20, North Carolina State, away; 22, 
Miami, away. 

Feb. 3: Navy, away; 6, North Carolina, home; 9, South 
Carolina, away; 10, Clemson, away; 13, Duke, home; 17, 
Wake Forest, away; 19, North Carolina, away; 21, Virginia, 
home; 24, Clemson, home. 

March 1-2-3, Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament, 
Raleigh, North Carolina. 



JO 



the Maryland Magazine 



Alumni Notes — from page 4 




professor crowell, right, introduces Mr. 
Hightower. 

Distinguished Reporter 
Talks to Journalism Students 

Everything in the political sphere moves 
away from disarmament. There is 
danger of conflict, but this problem can 
not be solved by war or compromise. 
Therefore, we will continue to live in 
conflict — a kind of war different from 
those fought in the past. 

John Hightower, international re- 
porter for the Associated Press, pre- 
sented these thoughts to an audience of 
journalism students and faculty in the 
Department of Journalism and Public 
Relations at the University. 

In a speech marking National News- 
paper Week at the College Park cam- 
pus, Hightower said that "President 
Kennedy must persuade Khrushchev 
that we are prepared to meet the Com- 
munist threat, or we might have to go 
to war to prove it." 

Hightower also cited four revolutions 
"which have a profound effect on what 
we do and think." 

He described the continuing indus- 
trial and scientific revolution. The ris- 
ing standard of living, urban growth, 
and population explosion are entwined 
in this process, he said. 

Referring to the colonial revolution, 
Hightower said that "more than 50 new 
nations have come into being in the 
last 10 to 15 years." 

Citing the Communist revolution, he 
said, "The Communists aim at destroy- 
ing Western culture — what we call free- 
dom." The extension of Communism 
is not because of ideology but power, 
he added. 

Then he described the present revolu- 
tion in weapons. "This has changed 



the nature of war. Man now has the 
power to destroy himself," he said. 

"These revolutions have created a 
world which is unstable but exciting 
and adventurous," he said. "It is the 
role of the journalist to make t his world 
of change more meaningful." 



Press Freedom and 
National Security 

If the freedom of the press is to remain 
unimpaired, there must be a high de- 
gree of responsibility on the part of 
the press itself. This is the finding 
of Dr. Carter R. Bryan, Assistant Pro- 
lessor of Journalism at the University. 
He spoke recently at the Association 
for Education in Journalism convention 
at the University of Michigan. 

Bryan's paper, "Security and the 
News in Liberal Countries: Self-im- 
posed and Governmental Censorship." 
showed that where editors have shown 
the highest degree of responsibility, 
governments have shown the greatest 
respect for the freedom of the press. 
However, in other countries, such as 
France, where there is little tradition 
of social responsibility on the part of 
the press, press freedom is sharply 
limited, he pointed out. 



1961 Enrollment Climbs 
15.1 Percent Over 1960 

Total enrollment this fall at College 
Park has climbed to more than 2,000 
over last year's figure. 

The total College Park enrollment 
figure for this year is 15,394, com- 
pared with 13,372 students registered 
last fall. This represents a 15.1 percent 
rise in overall enrollment. Nationwide 
college and university increases are ex- 
pected to be between six and seven and 
one half percent. 

Major reasons for the spurt in 
growth, President Elkins reports, were 
the large increase in the college-age 
population in Maryland, and the in- 
creased interest in obtaining a higher 
education among the youth of the 
State. 

Of this year's total enrollment, 12,- 
643 are undergraduates, a 13.6 per- 
cent increase over last year. Graduate 
student enrollment rose to 2,751, 22.9 
percent over last year. Both increases 
have been achieved without disturbing 
the student-teacher ratio of 18 to 1. 



I he College ol Aris and Sciences 
continued to It-ad in growth) report 
a total ol 4,626 undergraduate! 
compared with ^.727 last yeai ( ur- 
reniis second in size is I nginei 
with 1,996 full-time undergraduates 
I he ( ollege ol Business and Public 
Administration enrolled 1,869 students, 

and the ( ollege ol I Hue. .Hon 

students. 

Approximate!) $1.2 million ol ■■ $2.4 
million budget increase requested foi 

l l >o2 is earmarked to accommodate 
these enrollment increases and the fui 
ther upswing expected in tall ol I! 

Dr. K. Lee Hornbake. Vice President 

for Academic Allans at the University, 

gave several additional reasons tor the 

upswing m enrollment. Contributing 
to the increase, he said, were , . ."the 
academic probation plan of 1957 and 
the recently instituted pre-college sum- 
mer session program. Students who 
now enroll are meeting higher admis- 
sion standards ami are much more 
likely to remain in college. The present 
sophomore class appears to be the 
largest percentage of continuation of 
previous freshmen that we have ex- 
perienced to date. 1 he upper classes of 
juniors and seniors follow this pattern, 
too. 

"No doubt the new academic stand- 
ards have attracted more students to 
the University. Honors programs in 
the areas of physics and mathematics 
have also worked toward this end," he 
added. 

The total enrollment figure of 15.394 
does not include those students en- 
rolled in the many off-campus educa- 
tion centers of University College, nor 
those students in the College Park eve- 
ning division or the Professional Schools 
in Baltimore. 



New Dean Appointed to 
College of BPA 

Dr. Donald W. O'Connell. Program 
Associate for the Economic Develop- 
ment Administration of The Ford 
Foundation, has been appointed Dean 
of the University's College of Business 
and Public Administration, effective 
February 1 . 

He will succeed the Acting Dean o( 
the College, Professor James H. Reid, 
who has headed the Universitj o\ 
Maryland's second largest college since 
the retirement of Dean J. Freeman 
Pyle in June of this year. 

A native of New York City. Dr. 
O'Connell received a B.A. degree in 

(Continued on next page) 



November-December, 1961 



11 



1937, an M.A. degree in 1938, and a 
Ph.D. degree in 1953 from Columbia 
University. 

Dr. O'Connell was named a Kellett 
Fellow at Cambridge University (Great 
Britain) in 1938. The award is made to 
the top graduate in economics at Co- 
lumbia. 

The newly appointed dean has had 
wide experience as both teacher and an 
author. Between 1940 and 1959, he 
held numerous faculty positions at Co- 
lumbia University. These included In- 
structor and Associate in Economics; 
Assistant Dean and Assistant Professor 
of Banking, and Associate Professor of 
Banking in the Graduate School of Busi- 
ness. Later, he was Associate Director 
of the Consumer Credit Management 
Program in the same University school. 

Dr. O'Connell was an economic edi- 
torial writer for The New York Herald 
Tribune between 1949 and 1956. 

A member of Phi Beta Kappa, Dr. 
O'Connell holds memberships also in 
the American Economic Association, 
the American Finance Association and 
the Arctic Institute of North America. 

Annual Awards to Honor 

Memory of 

Dr. W. M. Gewehr 

Beginning with the academic year of 
1961-62, the two annual awards of 
Beta Omega Chapter of the Phi Alpha 
Theta National Honor Society in His- 
tory — one of $50 for the best under- 
graduate paper in history and another 
of $50 for the best graduate paper — 
henceforth will be known as the Wesley 
M. Gewehr Annual Awards. 

By these two awards Beta Omega 
Chapter hopes to honor the memory 
of the late Dr. Gewehr, whose long 
and distinguished career as professor, 
author, and chairman of the Depart- 
ment of History at the University of 
Maryland was an inspiration both to 
his colleagues and several generations 
of students. He was a charter member 
of the Chapter, and generously and 
warmly supported its numerous activi- 
ties. As an expression of gratitude, the 
Chapter dedicates the awards as a living 
memorial to him. 

With the object of placing these 
awards on a permanent and sound 
financial basis, the Chapter is estab- 
lishing a special sustaining fund to 
provide for an annual outlay of $100. 
To achieve this worthy goal, it is seek- 
ing contributions from members of 
Phi Alpha Theta as well as from 
friends and former students of Dr. 
Gewehr. 



College of 
AGRICULTURE 

A. B. Hamilton 



Personal Notes 

Dr. Arthur F. Novak, '37, was pro- 
moted to the rank of full Professor of 
Agricultural Chemistry and Biochemis- 
try at the Louisiana State University. 

Carl A. Sachs, '41, was recently pro- 
moted to the rank of Colonel in the 
United States Marine Corps at Nor- 
folk, Virginia, where he is presently on 
duty. Col. Sachs' son, Carl Ir., is a 
freshman at the University. 

James W. Sanders, Jr., '60, has been 
named route supervisor in the Home 
Service Department of Sealtest Foods 
Division of National Dairy Products 
Corporation in Washington, D.C. 

Wiley in Africa 

Joe Wiley, '49, a missionary in Mon- 
rovia, Liberia, was on the campus dur- 
ing the summer. He was home for a 
brief vacation after three years at a 
Lutheran Mission in Liberia. 

High Flying Dairyman 

Robert Shaffer, '53, checked in at 
Symons Hall this summer. His primary 
duty is flying for United Airlines on a 
run from Pittsburgh to Miami, but his 
interest is cows. He owns and between 
flights supervises a dairy farm of 130 
cows at Warrenton, Virginia. 

Service Award to Crouse 

Earl A. Crouse, '50, a civilian employee 
at Fort Belvoir, Va., was awarded a 
certificate and $250 for "Sustained 
Superior Performance of his duties in 
the Mechanical Engineering Branch of 
the Engineering Department." Crouse 
has been employed since 1959 at the 
Laboratories, which are the principal 
field agency of the Army Corps of 
Engineers for the research and develop- 
ment of new materials. 

Hamilton Heads Agricultural 
Services 

A. B. "Art" Hamilton has been trans- 
ferred from the Department of Agri- 
cultural Economics to the Dean's office 
to handle meetings and foreign groups 
for the College of Agriculture. The 
number of meetings, short courses, and 
foreign delegations coming to the Col- 
lege has become a major responsibility. 
At times Symons Hall looks like the 
United Nations with people from many 
lands. At the present time there are 
groups from nine countries studying 
extension methods. 

Maryland To Entertain Dairymen 

The annual meeting of the American 
Dairy Science Association will be held 



at the University of Maryland June 18- 
21, 1962. The Association is made up 
of about 3,000 members who are in- 
terested in the production, processing, 
and distribution of milk. The Univer- 
sity is honored to have this large group 
meet on our campus. 

Many Alumni On Dairy Program 

At least 15 alumni from the College of 
Agriculture presented papers at the 56th 
Annual Meeting of the American Dairy 
Science Association meeting at Madi- 
son, Wisconsin. Larry A. Wisher, a 
recent graduate and now a graduate 
student in the Dairy Department, had 
the honor of placing second in a Na- 
tional Contest for his work on flavor 
compounds in milk. 

Major symposium talks were given 
by J. T. "Tom" Reid and William "Bill" 
Hansel. Tom discussed energy require- 
ments for feeding dairy cattle, and Bill 
reported on developments in the knowl- 
edge of reproduction in dairy cattle. 

Mylo Downey, head of the 4-H 
Club work of the USDA, discussed the 
dairy program for 4-H use. 

Original research reports were given 
by Richard Bassette, Marvin Speck, 
Edgar A. Day, Herbert F. Richter, 
Richard Brown, Ira D. Porterfield, 
Frank Ellmore, Norman W. Hoover, 
Ira Katz, Milton Allison, and Gurson 
D. Turner. 

New Hat For Baden 

The Rev. John Baden, '39, was elected 
Archdeacon of the Episcopal Diocese 
of Virginia. This is his third hat as he 
is also executive secretary of the De- 
partment of Missions and a Diocesan 
Commissioner. The position of arch- 
deacon is the highest diocesan clerical 
position in the diocese next to the 
bishops. 

Rev. Baden is truly a rural minister 
at heart. He started with the idea of 
teaching agriculture, but along the high- 
way of life he had several detours. Now 
with his many church duties and a 
family of three children he still raises 
and sells pure bred sheep. 

Brownell Dairyman 

James Brownell, '31, has been climbing 
in many directions. After serving in the 
Army he returned and started a small 
dairy farm in Frederick County. When 
he outgrew the 50 acre farm he rented 
a larger farm in Montgomery County. 

Three years ago he took the big step 
and purchased a 700 acre farm at Blue- 
mont, Virginia. Today he is milking 
140 cows and has almost a hundred 
head of young cattle. Each morning 
they ship two and a half tons of milk. 

On a visit to their place I was im- 
pressed with the family attitude. They 
have four sons and a daughter and all 
have definite responsibilities and share 
in the decisions. 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Staff of the College 



Dr. Zucker Portrait Presented 

President Elkins, at a ceremony No- 
vember 26, accepted for the University 
an oil portrait of Dr. A. E. Zuckcr, 
Emeritus Head of the Foreign Lan- 
guage Department. From the walls of 
its new headquarters in the recently- 
completed Language Building, Dr. 
Zucker now looks down on the Depart- 
ment which he built up since 1923. 
The painting was a gift from "Three 
of his Friends." 

Dean Leon P. Smith, introduced by 
Dr. Douglas W. Alden, new Head of the 
Department, spoke of Adolph Zucker, 
teacher, scholar, and administrator, who 
now would be able to continue to keep 
an eye on the language department. 

Dr. Zucker replied that he and his 
wife, Dr. Lois Miles Zucker, wished 
they knew the identity of the anonymous 
donors so that they could thank them. 
He paid tribute to the artist, Col. James 
P. Wharton, Head of the Art Depart- 
ment, who had painted the large-size 
seated portrait. 

After the unveiling, University friends 
of Dr. Zucker's joined the members of 
the Department at a reception and tea 
tendered by President Elkins and Dr. 
Alden. 

Le Cercle Francais 

The University of Maryland branch 
of the Alliance Franchise held its first 
meeting of the year with Dr. Douglas 
W. Alden, new Head of the Language 
Department, as* guest speaker on the 
subject of old French chateux and 
churches. The talk, in French, was 
illustrated by slides. 

Visitors at College Park 

The Honorable Octavio Paz, Mexican 
Minister to France and distinguished 
Spanish-American poet, lectured at the 
University on "Contemporary Mexican 
Literature" and led a round table dis- 
cussion for a class in Latin American 
Civilization. 

The Director General of the Ecole 
Pratique de L'Alliance Francaise in 
Paris and Madame Gaston Mauger 
visited with the members of the Uni- 
versity's French Section. Monsieur 
Mauger, in this country as official lec- 
turer for the Alliance Francaise, was 
the guest of Professor William R. 
Quynn. 

Spanish Via TV 

Professor Frank Goodwyn is teaching 
elementary Spanish for the new educa- 
tional television station, WETA-TV. 



The course is sponsored jointly by the 
University and the Greater Washington 
Educational ["elevision Association, It 

conies on channel 26 al 7:30 p.m., 

Monday through Fridaj everj week 

The class, without credit and without 

tuition, is offered as a public service. 

Pi RSONAL Noi I s 

John P. McK.cc. '56, has been named 

Manager of Pacific Mutual 1 He's New 
Orleans insurance office. 

Lt. Col. Francis J. Kelly. '55, was re- 
cently selected to attend the Ainu 
War College at Carlisle Barracks, Penn- 
sylvania. 

John E. Raton, Ph.D. '58, has been 
appointed a research group leader at 
the Dayton, Ohio, Laboratory of Mon- 
santo Research Corporation, alter seiz- 
ing as a senior research chemist with 
Monsanto Chemical Company's Re- 
search & Engineering Division at that 
location. 

Jane P. Cahill, '54, has been pro- 
moted to Recruitment Manager in the 
SDD Personnel Department, Bethesda. 
Maryland, of the IBM Federal Systems 
Division. 

Andrew M. Sherling, '55, Assistant 
Professor of Air Science at the Uni- 
versity, has been promoted to Captain, 
United States Air Force. He has been 
a member of the University's Air 
Force ROTC staff since fall, I960. 

William Francis Benjamin, '55, re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy from the George Peabody 
College for Teachers. 

W. L. Faith, '28, consultant, has been 
elected President of Air Pollution Con- 
trol Association. 

Largest Interdepartmental Grant 

A contract in the amount of $912,000, 
the most extensive research grant for 
interdepartmental research ever given 
the University, has been awarded to a 
team of scientists here for the study of 
materials in the solid state. 

Sponsored by the Advanced Research 
Projects Agency of the Department of 
Defense, research on solid state physics, 
molecular structure and the behavior of 
materials will be conducted by faculty 
members in the University Depart- 
ments of Physics, Chemistry, and the 
Institute for Molecular Physics at Col- 
lege Park. The studies will be both 
experimental and theoretical. 

There are several areas of research 
marked out for special attention under 
the four-year project. 

All studies will be aimed to aid scien- 
tists to understand better the physical 
properties of materials and their be- 
havior in unusual states, tying this to 
our present knowledge of the structure 
of matter. 

The ARPA research project will be 
directed by an inter-departmental com- 
mittee of the two university depart- 
ments and institute. Headed by Dr. 
Ralph Myers, solid state theorist in the 



Department ol Physics the committee 

n ill include l)i Richard A 1 errell I >i 
Rolfe i Glover, ill. and i>i I dward 
\ Stern, also ol the Department of 
Physics; Dr. Homei w Schamp, "I the 
Institute toi Molecular Physics; and 
Dr. I Ihs R I ippincott, ol the Depart- 
men! ol ( bemisa j 

(81,600 Gram id Departmeni oi 

Ml( ROBIOI <><,<i 

An $81,600 grant t>> the I niversity's 

Department ol Microbiolog) liom the 

National Science Foundation will be 
used to renovate the microbiolog) 

graduate laboratories into one ol the 
most modern facilities m the nation. 

Awarded on a matching-fund basis. 

the construction funds will be doubled 
with an equal amount being added by 
the University. 

Plans call lor major interior renova- 
tions of the third Moor ol the Skinner 
Building here, including the construc- 
tion of eight new laboratories. In addi- 
tion, new research laboratories will be 
built for each faculty member ami the 
graduate students he supervises 

The 33-year-old University Depart- 
ment has a staff of six full-time faculty 
members, 50 graduate students and 300 
students taking undergraduate courses. 
Since 1928, 65" Ph.D. degrees have been 
awarded to graduates of the Department. 

Elected President 

Dr. Peter P. Lejins, Professor of 
Sociology, has been elected president 
designate of the American Correctional 
Association at its 91st Annual Congress. 
When Dr. Lejins' term of office begins 
September, 1962. he will be the first 
college professor to hold this office 
since 1912. 

More than 1000 delegates from 47 
states and many foreign countries at- 
tended the Congress which was held in 
Columbus, Ohio. Founded in 1870. 
the organization is made up of profes- 
sionals in the field of crime delinquency, 
and control. Among those present 
were prison wardens, psychiatrists, psy- 
chologists, probation and parole person- 
nel, and academic criminologists. 

Improvement of methods used in 
dealing with crime and delinquents is 
the purpose of the association. 

Dr. Lejins will succeed the director 
of Pennsylvania's Department of Cor- 
rections, Arthur Prassc, currently 
President of the association. 

Academic Appointments Ac i mm in 

Academic appointments have been ac- 
cepted by the following individuals who 
recently received their Ph.D degree in 
Microbiology: Dr. Paul Vasington, '61, 
Department of Microbiology. St. Johns 
University. L.I.. New York: Dr. Con- 
stantme 1 fthynuou. '6f. Department ot 
Biological Sciences. Carnegie Institute 
of Technology, Pittsburgh. Pennsyl- 
vania; Dr. Philip Provost, '61, Univer- 
{Continued on next page) 



November-December, 1961 



13 



sity of Maryland Medical School, Balti- 
more. Maryland; and Dr. Gerald 
Gilardi. "61. Department of Micro- 
biology, New York Medical College, 
New York. New York. 

Professor R. N. Doetsch has been 
appointed a member of the Archives 
Committee of the American Society of 
Microbiologists. 

Professor Michael J. Pelczar, Jr., at 
the invitation of the President of the 
University of New Hampshire, recently 
visited the Department of Microbiology 
of the University of New Hampshire to 
assess the graduate program. 

Professor P. Arne Hansen was the 
guest speaker at the Institute of Cellular 
Biology at the University of Connecti- 
cut. He spoke on the subject of 
"Demonstration of Structures in Bac- 
teria". 

Mr. David A. Power, graduate stu- 
dent in Microbiology, was recently 
awarded a predoctoral U.S.P.H.S. fel- 
lowship. Mr. Francis E. Cole, also a 
graduate student, was awarded a N.S.F. 
summer fellowship for continuation of 
his research. 

Recent visitors to the Department 
of Microbiology included Dr. W. G. 
Murrell, Division of Food Preservation, 
Homebush, N.S.W., Australia; Dr. Helge 
Larsen, Norges Tekniske Hogskole, 
Trondheim, Norway; and Dr. M. A. 
Palo, UNESCO fellow in marine micro- 
biology. 

Dr. Terry Named to OEG Staff 

Dr. Edgar R. Terry has joined the Oper- 
ations Evaluation Group (OEG) of 
M.I.T. as a member of the Washington, 
D. C. research staff. A graduate of the 
U. S. Naval Academy, Dr. Terry holds 
an M.A. in political science and geog- 
raphy from the University of Maryland 
and a Ph.D. in international relations 
and geography from The American 
University. 

OEG conducts operations analysis for 
the Office of the Chief of Naval Oper- 
ations in such areas as strategic plan- 
ning, air warfare, submarine and anti- 
submarine warfare and logistics. 

Dr. Terry was formerly a senior 
mathematician at Vitro Laboratories in 
Silver Spring, Maryland. A member of 
the Operations Research Society of 
America, he is also a Fellow of the 
Royal Geographical Society and mem- 
ber of Columbia University's Academy 
of Political Science and The Society of 
Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. 

Achievement in Space and 
Missile Work 

Allen M. Lenchek, Research Assistant, 
was awarded the Dr. Robert H. God- 
dard Memorial Scholarship Award by 
the National Rocket Club. The award 
was granted for outstanding achieve- 
ment in Space and Missile work. 

14 



Dinker Named to Lakeside Staff 

Milford H. Dinker, Jr., '51, has been 
named Assistant to the Domestic Sales 
Manager of Lakeside Laboratories, Inc., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Mr. Dinker formerly served as a 
medical service representative for the 
company for more than seven years in 
the Baltimore area. 



Elected a Director of Firm 

Dr. Arthur B. Hersberger, Ph.D. '36, of 

Radnor, Pennsylvania, General Man- 
ager of Marketing at The Atlantic Re- 
fining Company, was elected a Director 
of the firm. The board of directors also 
elected him a Vice President. 

Before advancing to his present po- 
sition as General Manager of Market- 
ing, Dr. Hersberger had been General 
Manager of foreign marketing and Man- 
ager of Special Sales. He joined Atlantic 
in 1936 in the Research and Develop- 
ment Department and was an Associate 
Director of the Department when he 
was appointed Manager of Chemical 
Sales in the Marketing Department in 
1947. In 1951 he was made Manager 
of the Products Sales Division and in 
1957 was appointed Manager of Head- 
quarters Sales and Special Services. 

Dr. Van Royen Receives 
Commemorative Edition of Book 

Dr. William Van Royen, Head of the 
University's Department of Geography, 
received a commemorative edition of 
his book, Fundamentals of Economic 
Geography. 

The book, which Dr. Van Royen 
co-authored with Dr. Nels A. Bengtson, 
University of Nebraska, Professor of 
Geography and Dean of the Junior Di- 
vision, Emeritus, has attained sales of 
more than 150,000 copies. Fundamen- 
tals of Economic Geography was first 
published in 1935 by Prentice-Hall, Inc. 

The book is a basic text for freshman 
or sophomore courses in economic, in- 
dustrial commercial and agricultural 
geography. 

A native of Utrecht, the Netherlands, 
Dr. Van Royen received his M.A. de- 
gree from Ryksuniversiteit, Utrecht, in 
1925. After coming to the United States 
in 1926, he received his Ph.D. from 
Clark University, Worcester, Massachu- 
setts in 1928. 

He joined the University of Maryland 
faculty as a Professor of Geography 
in 1944 and has been Head of the 
Department since 1951. 

Dr. Van Royen is the author of the 
Atlas of the World's Resources, Vol. I, 
"The Agricultural Resources of the 
World," and co-author with the late 
Oliver Vowles of the Atlas' Vol. II, "The 
Mineral Resources of the World." He 
is also author of The Low Countries 
Between the Great Powers in Political 
Geography. 



French Scholarship 

Two important contributions to the his- 
tory of ideas in the French Enlighten- 
ment were reviewed last spring by mem- 
bers of the Foreign Language Depart- 
ment. Dr. Alfred J. Bingham's review 
of Lester G. Crocker's An Age in Crisis 
appeared in The New Scholasticism, 
April 1961. Dr. Leonora C. Rosenfield 
reviewed Aram Vartanian's critical edi- 
tion of La Mettrie's L' Homme Machine 
in The Journal of Philosophy, June 22, 
1961. 

A Farewell Russian Literary 
Evening 

Mme. Marie Boborykine, retiring Rus- 
sian instructor, presented in the Student 
Union Auditorium earlier this year, the 
last and most brilliant of her series of 
Russian "literary" evenings, devoted to 
plays and music in Russian. The entire 
program was taped by the Voice of 
America. 

A citation by President Wilson H. 
Elkins, honoring Mme. Boborykine for 
her fifteen years of association with the 
University, whose Russian program she 
built up, was read by Dr. A. E. Zucker, 
former Head of the Department of 
Foreign Languages, and in Russian 
translation by Mr. Zinovieff. 

Scenes from Gogol's The Inspector 
General and Dead Souls, as well as 
Chekhov's short comedy Papa and the 
Fiance, were acted by the University's 
Russian students. The program was in- 
troduced in English by Mrs. Kosara 
Gavrilovic, Professor of Russian at 
Goucher College. 

A special feature of the evening was 
a little children's Choral Group that 
sang songs in perfect Russian. Third 
and fourth grade pupils of the Park- 
wood Elementary School were coached 
by Mrs. Alexandra Smirnoff. 

The grand finale of the program was 
a Russian Musical Ensemble, the well- 
known balalaika player Grisha Titoff, 
his wife Ania who sang Russian folk 
songs, and Henry Kindlam at the piano. 
In the audience were former students 
of Mrs. Boborykine who remembered 
nostalgically when they had acted in 
her plays before Maryland audiences. 

Microbiology Training Center 

The University's Department of Micro- 
biology has been chosen as a Microbi- 
ology training center by the U. S. Gov- 
ernment and will receive $170,370 over 
the next five years to expand its pro- 
gram. 

Dr. Raymond Doetsch, Professor in 
the Department, who will direct the 
training, said that the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Health, Education and Welfare 
funds will be used to support six stu- 
dents during the academic year. This 
will be in addition to the 49 graduate 
students presently working for advanced 
degrees in the department. 



the Maryland Magazine 



Speech Therapy Scholarship 
Established 

A graduate scholarship for women in 
speech therapy has been established at 
the University by the Suburban Wash- 
ington Alumnae Association of Kappa 
Kappa Gamma Sorority. 

"The scholarship will provide an addi- 
tional professional speech therapist each 
year which will help alleviate a short- 
age of therapists in Maryland," Pro- 
fessor Strausbaugh, head of the Depart- 
ment, said. 

Powell Receives Crown 
Zellerbach Foundation Award 

John Buncan Powell, '55, a graduate 
student at the School of Advanced Inter- 
national Studies, has been awarded the 
Crown Zellerbach Foundation scholar- 
ship award for the academic year 1961- 
1962. 

The grant was for $3,000, one of the 
highest honors a student can receive at 
the school. 

During the past summer Mr. Powell 
was the recipient of an OAS fellowship 
which allowed him to study the land 
reform program in Venezuela. 

Manager Named By 
National Airlines 

John G. BrinckerhofT, '39, was appointed 
northern area Manager in New York 
for National Airlines. He will direct all 
sales and service activities. 

Mr. BrinckerhofT began with National 
in 1953 as a Sales Representative in 
Tampa, Florida. He was later named 
District Sales Manager in Charleston, 
South Carolina and then opened the 
Boston office as District Sales Manager 
when the airline began service there in 
1956. 

He is a member of SKAL, an inter- 
national travel organization, and also 
the Boston Chamber of Commerce 
where he serves on the aviation com- 
mittee. 

Professor Sebastian Peter Grossman 

Sebastian Peter Grossman, '58, was 
recently appointed Professor at the Uni- 
versity of Iowa. 

He graduated summa cum laude from 
the University of Maryland and rece-ved 
his M.S. degree from Yale University 
the following year. He has just com- 
pleted work for his doctorate at Yale. 
While at Yale, Professor Grossman held 
several assistantships and fellowships, 
and was an Instructor in Experimental 
Psychology. At SUI he is organizing a 
new laboratory in physiological psychol- 
ogy. 

Professor of Languages and 
Linguistics 

Waldeman Matias, '54, is currently serv- 
ing as Cultural Coordinator and Pro- 



fessor of Languages and Linguistics tor 
the Institute De Idiomas in s.u> Paulo, 

Brazil. His job will include coming to 
the United States to interview teaching 

candidates for positions with the Insti- 
tute, building a protession.il library, and 
editing a scholarly and professional 
journal on linguistics anil its applica- 
tions. And most important, he \sill be 
speaking in other countries to establish 
cultural relations with them. 

In his letter to us, Mr. Matias says 
that, "Brazil is a most wonder! ul coun- 
try and a very hospitable one. Upon my 
arrival I was immediately welcomed by 
some Paulista families and since then I 
have been treated like a prince. The peo- 
ple are most interested in American In- 
stitutions and wish to study there." 

Mr. Matias is currently living at Rua 
7 de abril 230, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. 

Elected a Fellow in the APS 

Dr. John S. Toll, Chairman of the 
Physics Department, has recently been 
elected a Fellow in the American Physi- 
cal Society. 

Dr. Toll has been head of the Physics 
Department at the University since 
1953. He was graduated from Yale 
University in 1944 with highest honors, 
receiving a B.S. in physics. Jn 1948 he 
took a master's degree in physics at 
Princeton and later, in 1952, a Ph.D. 

New Doctors of Foreign Language 

Two instructors of the Foreign Lan- 
guage Department obtained their doc- 
toral degrees last summer from the De- 
partment, Dr. May Roswell in German, 
and Dr. Richard F. Allen in Spanish. 
Dr. Allen has become Assistant Profes- 
sor at Wake Forest College. 

Mediaeval Erudition 

Dean Leon P. Smith has found time out 
of his busy administrative program to 
turn back to his old loves, Romance 
philology and mediaeval literature. His 
article "A Newly Discovered Manu- 
script Fragment of the Old French Par- 
tonopeus de Blois" appeared in the May 
issue of Modern Philology, published 
at the University of Chicago. 

Dr. Bulatkin Leaves For 
Ohio State 

Dr. Eleanor W. Bulatkin of the Depart- 
ment of Foreign Languages, has been 
appointed as Associate Professor at 
Ohio State University. 

Parasitologist Awarded 

Dr. James Turner, Ph.D. '57, who 
earned three degrees while holding down 
a full-time job, has been awarded the 
top honor in the field of Parasitology. 
Dr. Turner is a senior research para- 
sitologist at the Agriculture Research 



( enter, Beltsville. He is the Bral recipi- 
ent ot the Brayton Howard Ransom Me 
modal Award "tor meritorious m-imu- 
to parasitology and related scieno 

He v.. is eleeted tor the intein.ilion.il 
citation by the trustees ot the Hehnin 

thological Society ot Washington, ihe 

Society, established 1910, created the 
aw aril to perpetuate the inemors ol I )r 
Ransom, who was intel n.itionalK le 
nized lor his contributions to the study 
and control ot parasites at the tune ol 
his death in 1926. 



College of 

EDUCATION 



Mary J. A halt 



WHO Appoints Dr. Seyi i i R 
to Taiwan 

Dr. Charlotte Seyffer, D.Ed. '59, WHO 

Senior Nurse Educator at the Higher 
Institute of Nursing, University of 
Alexandria, United Arab Republic, has 
been appointed Senior Nurse Educator 
of the WHO-assisted nursing education 
project in Taiwan. 

The World Health Organization 
(WHO) has helped establish a school 
of nursing at the National Taiwan Uni- 
versity in Taipei, Taiwan. Assignment 
of WHO nurse educators to the school, 
which started in 1952, is expected to 
continue until 1965. 

Television Script 

Dr. Jean R. Grambs, Lecturer in Educa- 
tion, co-authored The Junior High 
School We Need published by the 
ASCD of the National Education As- 
sociation. 

Dr. Gramb's television script "Whose 
Decision?", depicting an unfinished 
problem in the lives of several high 
school athletes, used by WGBH-TV in 
Boston for a one-hour experimental 
program was awarded honorable men- 
tion by the Ohio State University In- 
stitute. 

Speaking Engagements 

Dr. Jean R. Hebeler, Coordinator of 
Special Education Program, addressed 
a Conference in the Maryland State 
Department of Education and the 
Baltimore County Special Education 
staff. 

Dr. Richard H. Byrne, Professor of 
Education, presented the address to the 
graduates at Bloomsburg State Col- 
lege in Pennsylvania, "The Enemy. 
Nothingness, and You!" He also ad- 
dressed the annual banquet of the 
Chamber of Commerce at Cambridge. 
Maryland, on the topic "Psychological 
Issues in Occupational Decisions." 

{Continued on next page) 



November-December, 196 J 



15 




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Dr. Jean R. Grambs served as the 
keynote speaker at the Annual 4-H 
Leadership Conference held at the Na- 
tional 4-H Center on Connecticut Ave- 
nue in Washington, D.C. 

Mrs. Alphoretta Fish, Instructor in 
Education, recently gave a talk on sci- 
ence to the elementary school PTA at 
Church Hill, Maryland. 

Dr. Lyle D. Schmidt, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Education and Counselor in the 
University Counseling Center, presented 
a paper "Trends in Legal Responsibili- 
ties of Student Personnel Workers" at 
the APGA Annual Convention. 

Educational Policies Commission 

Dr. Vernon E. Anderson, Dean of the 
College of Education, will serve as 
Adviser to the Educational Policies 
Commission for a term of three years. 
The Commission, sponsored by the Na- 
tional Educational Association of the 
United States and the American Asso- 
ciation of School Administrators, is 
responsible for identifying significant 
educational problems and issues, study- 
ing them, and publishing policy recom- 
mendations concerning them. 

Library Science Education 

A new undergraduate program in Li- 
brary Science Education, under the di- 
rection of Dale W. Brown, being 
organized within the College of Educa- 
tion has offered the first library science 
courses, September 1961. Designed as 
an eighteen-hour program of library sci- 
ence professional courses, the emphasis 
will be primarily on school librarian- 
ship. Courses will be available to stu- 
dents pursuing a four-year curriculum, 
as well as to in-service teachers and 
school librarians. 

Mr. Brown is working with a com- 
mittee composed of representatives of 
schools and libraries throughout the 
state as well as members of the College 
of Education faculty in the planning and 
developing of this program. 

Awards 

Mr. William Middleton, a graduating 
senior at the University of Maryland 
majoring in Business Education, was 
presented the United Business Educa- 
tion Association Award of Merit for 
outstanding achievement in Business 
Education by Dr. Arthur S. Patrick, 
Professor of Business Education. Mr. 
Middleton plans to continue his work at 
the University as a Graduate Assistant 
in the College of Education. 

The following students from the Col- 
lege of Education were selected to 
Mortar Board, the senior women's hon- 
orary on campus, at the annual Maye 
Daye ceremonies: Shelley R. Landay 
and Jacqueline Carrick. Miss Karen 
Jacobsen, the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. 
Eckhart Jacobsen, Associate Profes- 
sor of Education, was also selected. 



The following awards were made to 
students in the College of Education: 
Linda Slan — Top ranking student in 
the College of Education; Marlene 
Murray — Outstanding woman selected 
for the Alumni Award; William T. 
Middleton — Outstanding man selected 
for the Alumni Award; and Jack A. 
Crabill — Phi Delta Kappa Award. 

Personal Notes 

Mrs. Betty Cavin Bethards, '61, is 
teaching at the Wicomico Senior High 
School, Salisbury, Maryland, this year. 

Dr. Kenneth B. Hoyt, '48, has been 
promoted to full Professor at the State 
University of Iowa. 

David Larioza, M. Ed. '53, received 
a master of arts degree from Western 
Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. 



College of 
ENGINEERING 

Presley A. Wedding 

Whereabouts 

Donald R. Henderson, '59, employed by 
the J. E. Greiner Co., Baltimore, has 
been transferred to Denver, Colorado, 
to serve in the position of Project Engi- 
neer for the headquarter's function of 
the company's missile base organization 
for the expected stay of two years. Mr. 
Henderson resides with his wife and son 
at 5551 South Delaware, Apt. 3, Little- 
ton, Colorado, and would like to hear 
from his many Terp friends. 

Guggenheim Fellowship 

Dr. Harold Staras, Ph.D. '55, of the 
RCA Laboratories technical staff at the 
David Sarnoff Research Center, was 
awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for 
one year to undertake "studies of com- 
munications systems that utilize new 
modes of wave propagation." 

Personal Notes 

Saul S. Seltzer, '52, is now Director of 
Engineering for Towers Properties, Inc., 
the real estate and development com- 
ponent of Towers Marts International, 
Inc. of New York City and Toronto, 
Canada. 

James H. Harlow, '23, was named 
Chief Engineer of the Philadelphia Elec- 
tric Company's Engineering and Re- 
search Department. 

Sanford Samuel Sternstein, '58, has 
been appointed an Assistant Professor 
of Chemical Engineering at Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York. 

Donald P. Easter, '42, was recently 
honored for his work at the U.S. Army 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 



Engineer Research and Development 

Laboratories, Fort Belvoir, Virginia. 
Mr. Easter was presented with a Depart- 
ment of the Army certificate and $250 
for "Sustained Superior Performance'" 
of his duties in the Basic Research 
Laboratory. 

Morris Gisser, M.S. '53, has recently 
joined the staff of the National Bureau 
of Standards, U.S. Department of Com- 
merce. Mr. Gisser will study and 
evaluate new concepts in combined 
analog and digital computation. 

Earl A. Crouse, '51, was presented 
with a certificate and $250 for "Sus- 
tained Superior Performance" of his 
duties in the Mechanical Engineering 
Branch of the Engineering Department, 
Fort Belvoir, Virginia. 

William J. Ulrick, "58, has been ap- 
pointed an engineering representative 
for Consolidated Systems Corporation. 
Mr. Ulrick has been assigned to CSC's 
northern regional office in Washington, 
D.C., where he will provide engineering 
liaison with emphasis on digital data 
processing equipment. 

G. J. Ferguson With Patent Office 

A letter from Isaac Fleischmann, Direc- 
tor, Office of Information Services of 
the U.S. Patent Office, to Dean Mavis 
tells of the employment of Gerald J. 
Ferguson, Jr., EE '58. To quote Mr. 
Fleischmann: 



"Mr. Ferguson performs professional, 
scientific and technical research in ex- 
amining applications for patents in the 
art of Oscillators and Antennas, The 

research he conducts results m de- 
cisions he makes on vital questions per- 
taining to patentability. He also inter- 
views inventors and attorneys concern- 
ing applications tor patents. As ,i 
patent examiner, he has the privilege 

of viewing first-hand latest technological 
developments. 

"Commissioner ol Patents. Robert ( . 
Watson, and the stall of the United 
States Patent Office commend your 

university and its curriculum." 

Dr. Si k;ii Promoted 

Dr. Arnold E. Seigel. ME '44. has been 
named head of the Ballistics Depart- 
ment at the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, 
White Oak, Maryland. This position 
was last filled by Dr. Z. I. Slawsky. who 
now heads the Physics Research De- 
partment and holds a part-time teach- 
ing position at Maryland. Dr. Seigel 
was Chief of the Gas Dynamics Di- 
vision. 

In his new job Dr. Seigel will be re- 
sponsible for theoretical and experi- 
mental research in ballistics, including 
the fields of gas dynamics and missile 
dynamics. 

A native of Washington, Dr. Seigel 
attended Roosevelt High School, grad- 
(Continued on next page) 



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uating at the head of his class. In 1944 
he graduated first in his class at the 
University of Maryland with a degree 
in Mechanical Engineering. Going on 
to the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, he earned an M.S. degree in 
Mechanical Engineering in 1947. After 
joining the staff of NOL in 1948, he 
was sent by the Laboratory to do re- 
search in high pressure gas dynamics 
at the University of Amsterdam, Hol- 
land, where he earned a doctorate in 
Physics. 

After returning to NOL in 1952, Dr. 
Seigel also accepted a position as 
Lecturer in the Aeronautical Engineer- 
ing and later in the Mechanical Engi- 
neering Department at the University 
of Maryland. 

Dr. Seigel is a member of the follow- 
ing honorary societies: Sigma Xi 
(scientific), Tau Beta Pi (engineering), 
Pi Tau Sigma (mechanical engineer- 
ing), Phi Kappa Phi, and Phi Eta 
Sigma. He is listed in Who's Who in 
American Science, and Who's Who in 
American Engineering. 

Dr. Seigel is married to the former 
Rhoda Ottenberg of Washington. They 
have three children: Harold, 8; Lisa, 
5; and Stuart, 3. The Seigels live at 3302 
Pauline Drive, Chevy Chase, Md. 

Here and There 

Terrell Holliday, CE '58, on a recent 
visit, informed us that he is a Pilotless 
Aircraft Engineer with the National 
Aeronautical and Space Agency. 

Norman Hathaway, ChE '43, is Ex- 
ecutive Vice President, Nitrogen Di- 
vision, Allied Chemical Corporation, 
Riverside, Connecticut. 

Mr. P. H. Collins, ME '34, Mrs. 
Collins and son Guy and Walter Maack 
visited the campus this past spring. 
Mr. Collins is Engineer, DuPont Com- 
pany, Penns Grove, New Jersey. 

William Rosenberg, Class of 1950, 
is now Chief Engineer of Universal 
Machine Co. in Baltimore. 

Arthur G. McDearmon, Class of 
1946, has been advanced to a new posi- 
tion of sales manager at Catalyst Re- 
search Corporation, Baltimore, Md. 

Robert B. Sherfy, Class of 1951, has 
accepted a position with the U.S. Army 
Engineer Research and Development 
Laboratories, Fort Belvoir, Va. 

Richard M. Jansson, ME '54, has 
joined the staff of Frederick S. Bacon 
Laboratories in Watertown, Mass., as a 
project engineer. 

Professor Hennick Retires 

Professor Donald C. Hennick is re- 
tiring as of June 1961 after forty-two 
years of service to the University of 
Maryland. A member of the Mechani- 
cal Engineering staff since 1919, Pro- 
fessor Hennick completed studies at 
Johns Hopkins University and the 
University of Maryland, where he re- 
ceived his bachelor of science degree. 



18 



the Maryland Magazine 



Post retirement plans call for extensive 
travel for him and Mrs. Hennick 
throughout Europe. 

Dr. Lobb, Program Chief 
Dr. R. Kenneth Lobb, Lecturer in the 
Department of Aeronautical Engineer- 
ing, has been named Program Chief for 
Aeroballistics at the Naval Ordnance 
Laboratory. 

A native of Canada, Dr. Lobb was 
born in Edmonton, Alberta. He did 
his undergraduate work at the Univer- 
sity of Alberta, earning a degree in en- 
gineering physics in 1947. He next 
studied at the University of Toronto 
where he completed a Ph.D in aero- 
nautical engineering in 1950. 

Dr. Weske Appointed To 
IAS Committee 
Dr. John R. Weske, Professor of Aero- 
nautical Engineering, has recently been 
appointed to a national committee of 
the Institute of Aerospace Sciences to 
advise on student activities of the In- 
stitute and on accreditation standards 
in Aerospace Engineering. Other 
prominent educators appointed to the 
committee include Dr. William Sears 
and Dr. Courtland D. Perkins, Head 
of Aerospace Engineering at Cornell 
and Princeton Universities respectively. 

Bill Ahrendt Dies In 
Plane Crash 
William R. Ahrendt, former lecturer 
for fifteen years in Electrical Engineer- 
ing, died September 1, with his wife 
and three of his four children, in the 
crash of his private plane high in the 
Peruvian Andes. He was serving as 
visiting professor at Peru's National 
University of Engineering at the time 
of the plane crash. 

Ahrendt started his own instrumenta- 
tion firm in College Park in 1946. 
Eight years later the Ahrendt Instru- 
ment Company merged with Litton In- 
dustries of Beverly Hills, California, 
with him as Vice President of the new 
firm. He retired in 1957, at the age of 
37 years, to become a private engi- 
neering consultant. 

He wrote many technical treatises 
and was a contributor to Encyclopedia 
Britannica on the science of servo- 
mechanisms. 

News of Recent Graduates 
David Fullarton, '61, is now working 
for the National Rural Electric Co- 
operative Association in Washington, 
D.C., and has begun law school at 
George Washington University at night. 

James Rand, '61, is a new Instructor 
in Aeronautical Engineering and is 
working toward his Ph.D in AE. He 
is also doing research on the hypersonic 
gun tunnel. 

Nils Hveding, '60, is working as an 
Engineer for Page Communications 
Engineers, Inc., in Washington, D.C. 
(Continued on next page) 



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Dingman Elected Executive 
Vice President 
James E. Dingman, '21, Vice President 
and Chief Engineer, was elected Ex- 
ecutive Vice President at A.T.&T. 

Mr. Dingman began his Bell System 
career in 1922, as a tester in the instal- 
lation organization of Western Electric 
in Baltimore. The next year he joined 
Long Lines and worked in the Plant 
Department in New York City and in 
Troy, New York, before becoming 
District Plant Superintendent at New 
Haven in 1930. He held various Long 
Lines plant jobs until 1943 when he 
was named Employee Relations Man- 
ager of Long Lines. 

Mr. Dingman was elected a Vice 
President of the Bell Telephone Com- 
pany of Pennsylvania in 1949, and was 
in charge of personnel before being 
named Vice President-operations. In 
1952 he was elected Vice President and 
General Manager of Bell Labs. He 
returned to Long Lines as Director of 
Operations in 1956. 

Since 1959, he has been at A. T. & T. 
as Vice President and Chief Engineer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dingman live in Sum- 
mit, New Jersey. 



College of 

HOME ECONOMICS 



Dean Selma Lippeatt 



Faculty Notes 
New faculty members in the College of 
Home Economics include: Mary S. 
Eheart and Helen Thompson, Food and 
Nutrition; Paula Sutton, Family Life 
and Management; Louise Johnson, Tex- 
tiles and Clothing; Cornelia Beckwith, 
Applied Art. 

The Department of Home Manage- 
ment in the College of Home Economics 
became the Department of Family Life 
and Management on July 1. 

Alumnae Board 
The Alumni Board of the College has 
developed two exhibits to be used in 
promoting public understanding of the 
College and its offerings. 

The new officers of the Alumnae 

Board for the 1961-62 year are: 

Mrs. Ruth Lee Thompson Clarke 

President 

Mrs. Mary Ward Davis 

Vice-President 

Miss Amelia Catakis 

Secretary 

Miss Mary Kay Labbe 

Treasurer 

Last year's board has distributed 
flyers to Montgomery County Public 
School libraries with a request that 
suggested publications in Home Eco- 



nomics be made available to students. 
This year's board is going to continue 
this work and add more publications 
to the list. 

Alumnae News 
Miss Harriett Willette Bland, better 
known as "Billie," of the Havre de 
Grace High School, retired in October 
from active teaching rank, after 38 
years of service in Home Economics. 
Harriett was a member of the first 
graduating class in Home Economics 
at the University of Maryland. 

The College of Home Economics has 
been notified of the death of Mrs. Elaine 
Knowles Weaver in October. 

Shirley Corkran McCalley, '57, who 
had a baby born in September, is back 
working on her master's degree this fall. 

Phyliss Zaroff, Feb. '61, is now 
Phyllis Garbis, and a 1933 graduate, 
Dorothy Treasa Lane, is now Mrs. 
Gosch, and is teaching Home Eco- 
nomics in a Balmont, California, High 
School. 

School of 

LAW 

Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich 



Personal Notes 
Thomas E. Long, '52, appointed as 
regional real estate representative for 
the American Oil Company. 

Joseph J. DeSalvo, '59, has been 
named a Tax Attorney for the Esso 
Region, Humble Oil & Refining Com- 
pany. 

Frank Markoe, Jr., '50, has been ap- 
pointed Vice President of Warner- 
Lambert Pharmaceutical Company of 
Morris Plains, New Jersey. Mr. 
Markoe is also Secretary, Counsel and 
a member of the Board of Directors of 
Warner-Lambert and he is a Director 
of two of its subsidiaries — Maryland 
Glass Corporation and Pro-phylac-tic 
Brush Company. 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



$36,000 Grant 
The National Institutes of Health has 
awarded a three-year $36,000 grant to 
Dr. Richard D. Richards, Head of the 
Department of Ophthalmology at the 
University's School of Medicine, to sup- 
port a study of radiation cataracts. 

Dr. Emil Blair 
Dr. Emil Blair, a faculty member in 
the division of Thoracic Surgery of the 
University's School of Medicine, has 
been awarded a senior fellow grant by 
the National Institutes of Health. 



20 



the Maryland Magazine 



The award, one of seven made this 
year throughout the country, is in- 
tended to encourage the pursuit of re- 
search as a career by investigators with 
background in clinical research as well 
as the basic sciences. 

Dr. Blair's grant, which provides five 
years' support for his research in ex- 
perimental coronary disease, makes him 
eligible for successive grants, made on 
a merit basis, which can lead to a career 
professorship, awarded for life. 

The first senior fellow grant ever 
made to a clinician by the NIH was 
awarded in 1959 to a colleague of Dr. 
Blair's at the University of Maryland. 
Dr. William S. Spicer, Jr., Associate 
Professor of Medicine and Head of the 
Medical School's Section for Pulmonary 
Diseases. Dr. Spicer is now working 
on air pollution and respiratory prob- 
lems. 

The object of Dr. Blair's research is 
to produce experimental heart attack in 
animals in order to study the changes 
that occur in heart failure, both func- 
tional and pathological. Dr. Blair also 
hopes to find surgical ways to treat the 
thrombosis, or clotting that produces 
the heart attack, and the heart failure 
that results. 

Postgraduate Courses 
The Committee on Postgraduate Educa- 
tion of the University's School of Medi- 
cine has announced seven postgraduate 
courses for the academic year 1961-62. 

According to Dr. Patrick B. Storey, 
Chairman and Director of the Com- 
mittee, the courses are designed to give 
the Physicians of Maryland an oppor- 
tunity to continue their medical educa- 
tion under the guidance of leading 
faculty members of their state univer- 
sity. 

The program follows : 
Basic Electrocardiography — November 
2, 3, 4, 1961 

Dr. Leonard Scherlis. Limited to 30 

students. 

Highly individualized instruction in 

the interpretation of EKG tracings. 
Neuropathology for Pathologists — No- 
vember 13-17,' 1961 

Dr. John A. Wagner. Limited to 12 

students. 

Given at the practical level, it will 



include drill in cutting, blocking. 
staining, and microscopic sliuh ot 
specimens 
Endocrinology and Metabolism- Jan- 
uary 12, 13, 1962 

Dr. Thomas B. Connor and Dr. John 
(i. Wiswell. Limited to 30 students 
Demonstrations and drills in inter- 
pretation of various clinical pictures 
and associated chemical findings \mII 
be conducted in small group sessions. 
Advances in Medical Science — January 
10 through May 16, 1962 (IS conse- 
cutive Wednesdays, 4:00-6:00 p.m.) 
Dr. Patrick B. Storey. Limited to 60 
students. 

Designed for experienced physicians 

who wish to review recent progress 

in medical science. 

Clinical Anatomy — January 29-May 21, 

1 962 ( 3 hours every Monday and 

Wednesday for 15 weeks) 

Dr. Otto C. Brantigan. Limited to 14 
students. 

Designed to aid in preparation for 
examination in anatomy of American 
Board of Surgery. 
Clinical Cardiology — February 1, 2, 3, 
1962 
Dr. Leonard Scherlis. Limited to 30 
students. 

The practical aspects of the newer 
techniques of investigation such as 
right and left heart catheterization, 
dye dilution curves, angiocardiog- 
raphy, sound and pulse tracing, etc., 
will be included. The course will be 
featured by case presentations and 
clinical exercises. 
Hematology — March 8 and 9, 1962 
Dr. Milton S. Sacks. Limited to 25 
students. 

Illustrative blood and bone marrow 
slides will be provided each student 
in connection with selected case ma- 
terial. 

Immunized Against Measles 
More than 4,000 children, 3,700 of 
them Maryland children, have been 
immunized against measles under the 
direction of Dr. Fred R. McCrumb, 
Jr., of the University's School of Medi- 
cine. 

Dr. McCrumb reported his work at 
the International Conference on Measles 
Immunization in Bethesda, Maryland. 
(Continued on next page) 



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where 75 participants represented 22 
different countries, including Russia, 
Poland, and South Africa. 

Using a live virus vaccine developed 
from naturally occurring measles by 
Nobel Prize Winner John F. Enders, 
Dr. McCrumb found a way to prevent 
most side effects of the immunization 
procedure. 

Of the first children vaccinated, 
nearly all reacted with some degree of 
fever and rash (something like a very 
light case of measles) and as many as 
20 per cent had a temperature above 
103° F. 

Dr. McCrumb and his colleagues 
have been able to counteract this by 
giving a shot of gamma globulin right 
after the vaccination. (Gamma globulin 
is the fraction of blood that contains 
most of the antibodies.) 

With this modification, he found 
less than 10 per cent of the children 
had significant fever and temperatures 
rose above 103° F. in only 2 per cent 
of those vaccinated. 

The gamma globulin did not weaken 
the vaccine, which blood tests showed 
to be more than 97 per cent effective. 

In Maryland alone, he expects to 
have many thousand more children vac- 
cinated by spring, and at that time a 
commercial vaccine will probably be 
on the market. 



School of 

NURSING 



Joan White 



Twenty-Seven Graduates 
Twenty-seven graduates of the Division 
of Practical Nursing in the School of 
Nursing have received their certificates 
and are qualified to take the State Board 
examination for licensure. 

Miss Ellen Kirsten Slater, President 
of the class, has entered the School of 
Nursing at Maryland General Hospital. 

Members of the class from Baltimore 
include Mrs. Dozie Bailey, Mrs. Mada- 
lyn Byers, Mrs. Elizabeth Carson, Miss 
Carol Christopher, Mrs. Martha Curtis, 
Mrs. Jurelyne Fowler, Miss Miriam 
Freeman, Miss Hilda Henson, Mrs. 
Romona Iden, Miss Brenda Johnson, 
Mrs. Elouise Johnson, Miss Joyce Jones, 
Mrs. Edythe Minor, Mrs. Erma Moore, 
Mrs. Charlesette Robinson, Miss Bea- 
trice Spruell, Miss Marian Williams, 
and Mrs. Beatrice Young. 

Out-of-town members are Miss Ruth 
Brehm, Ellicott City; Mrs. Ruth John- 
ston, Glen Burnie; Miss Nellie Kline, 
Hagerstown; Miss Sharon LaRue, 
Lutherville; Mrs. Virginia Reddick, Lin- 
wood; Mrs. Constance Riddick, Penn- 
sylvania; Miss Charlotte Webb, Hale- 
thorpe; and Miss Louise Woerner, 
Catonsville. 



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Baltimore 2, Md. 



22 



the Maryland Magazine 



School of 

PHARMACY 



Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 
Dr. B. Olive Cole 



Annual Frolic 

The fifteenth Annual Frolic of the 
Alumni Association of the School of 
Pharmacy was held in the Straus Audi- 
torium, Park Heights and Slade Ave- 
nues, Baltimore, on Novemher 9, 1961. 

The entertainment consisted of nine 
skits produced by the undergraduate 
students of the School under the super- 
vision of Dr. Frank J. Slama, Executive 
Secretary of the Alumni. 

President James P. Craig, Jr. wel- 
comed the guests and awarded the 
prizes. Milton A. Friedman was Mas- 
ter of Ceremonies. Dean Noel E. Foss 
expressed appreciation of the work of 
the Alumni Association. The audience, 
numbered approximately 400 persons. 

The following captured the prizes: 

The Newman Club — First Cash 
Prize and the Bernard Cherry Cup, pre- 
sented by him personally, for one year, 
together with a token cup for the Club. 

Phi Delta Chi Fraternity — Second 
Cash Prize. 

Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity — Third 
Cash Prize. 

The Phi Sigma Delta Fraternity also 
presented an entertaining skit. 

The following individual acts re- 
ceived prizes: 

M. Neal Jacobs and The Newcomers 
tied for First Cash Prize; David Lebo- 
witz secured the second individual Cash 
Prize; The Brothers Three rated fourth 
place. 

Scripto pens were presented to the 
participants in the two last mentioned 
groups, and also to Miss Marjorie 
Abramovitz, who posted the signs for 
each act as they appeared on the stage. 

The judges were Past Presidents of 
the Alumni Association. Herman Bloom 
was the photographer. The music be- 
tween the presentations and for danc- 
ing was by Gene Bonner's Orchestra. 

Refreshments were served by the 
Place and Refreshments Committee, 
Sam A. Goldstein, Chairman, ably as- 
sisted by members of the Alumni and of 
the Traveler's Auxiliary of the Mary- 
land Pharmaceutical Association. 

Door prizes in quantity and quality 
were provided by Loewy Drug Co., 
Muth Brothers, Calvert Drug Company, 
Henry B. Gilpin Company, Allen and 
Sons, F. A. Davis & Son, I. and L. 
Candy and Tobacco Company, Noe 
Equal Hosiery Company and the Ihrie 
Potato Chip Company. 

The Washington's Birthday Dance of 
the Alumni Association will be held on 

{Continued on next page) 




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Thursday, February 22, 1962, Emerson 
Hotel, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. 

The Annual Alumni Banquet will be 
held on Thursday, June 7, 1962, The 
Baltimore Union Building, 621 West 
Lombard Street. 

Scholarships 
The Student Aid and Scholarship Com- 
mittee of the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy, Samuel I. Raich- 
len, Chairman, selected the following 
as recipients of scholarships at the 
University of Maryland, College Park 
and at the Baltimore Junior College, as 
pre-pharmacy students for the session of 
1961-62: 

Patricia Carol Abbott 

Michael J. Walsh 

Sharon J. Jasilaitis 

Richard L. Cysyk 

James R. Goulden 

Allan Gus Lamartina 

Jacquelin Grace Morton 

Joan Marie Weiner 

John R. Newcomb 

These scholarships are provided by 
the Alumni Association, the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association and the 
Read Drug Stores Foundation, Inc., and 
include tuition, fees, textbooks and 
equipment not to exceed $500.00 for 
the academic year. The recipients are 
selected on the basis of worthiness, 
scholastic achievement and the need of 
financial assistance. 

The following were the recipients for 
the first semester of 1961-62 scholar- 
ships from the annual donation of 
$400.00 provided by the Alumni Asso- 
ciation of the School of Pharmacy to 
match a corresponding amount for 
scholarships from the American Foun- 
dation for Pharmaceutical Education 
for undergraduates: 

Louis Gubinsky — Senior 
Walter Mackay — Senior 

This arrangement with the American 
Foundation for Pharmaceutical Educa- 
tion has been in effect for many years 
and numberless students have enjoyed 
these scholarships. 

Faculty Honored At Dinner 
A Testimonial Dinner in honor of Miss 
Georgianna S. Gittinger, Instructor in 
Pharmacology; Dr. Claire S. Schradieck, 
Assistant Professor of Foreign Lan- 
guages; Dr. Gaylord B. Estabrook, Pro- 
fessor of Physics; and Dr. Allie W. 
Richeson, Professor of Mathematics, 
was held at The Baltimore Union on 
Tuesday, June 20, 1961. Members of 
the faculty of the School of Pharmacy, 
their wives and/or escorts were invited 
to attend. 

Miss Gittinger retired July 31, 1961, 
after having, been associated with the 
School of Pharmacy since 1936. Miss 
Gittinger received her formal education 
at Hood College and the University of 
Virginia and prior to her association 
with the University of Maryland taught 



The gathering place for 
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new Student Activities Building. 
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Buy U. S. Savings Bonds 
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24 



the Maryland Magazine 



science and history in several private 
schools and held a position as Junior 
Pharmacologist with the U.S. Food and 
Drug Administration. 

Drs. Schraclicck, Estabrook and 
Richeson, transferred to the College 
Park campus of the University to teach 
in their respective fields inasmuch as 
the courses which they offered in the 
School of Pharmacy are now incor- 
porated in the pre-pharmacy curriculum 
of the School of Pharmacy at College 
Park. 

Alumni News 
Dr. John J. Sciarra, Ph.D. '57, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry at St. John's University's 
College of Pharmacy, has been invited 
as the sole representative of the United 
States to participate in the program of 
the Third International Aerosol Con- 
gress of the Federation of European 
Aerosol Associations meeting in Lu- 
cerne, Switzerland during the week of 
October 3-8, 1961. 

The program will include presenta- 
tions by 1 1 leading figures in the field of 
aerosol research from the countries of 
Europe in addition to Dr. Sciarra. He 
will present a paper on "Development 
of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Aero- 
sols in the United States." Dr. Sciarra 
is one of the foremost experts in the 
United States on aerosols and his paper 
will include current research now un- 
derway in St. John's laboratories. 

In conjunction with his appearance 
at the Aerosol Congress, Dr. Sciarra has 
obtained a month's leave of absence 
from St. John's to visit various colleges 
of pharmacy and aerosol companies in 
England, Belgium, France, Italy and 



Switzerland, to observe European tech- 
niques and their latest developments. 
He will leave New York on Septembei 
1, and return to St. John's following the 
Aerosol Congress. 

Donald C. drove. Ph.G. '2'>. M.S. in 
Pharmacy '30, M.S. in phannaeeulic.il 
chemistry '33, and Ph.D. in pharma- 
ceutical chemistry '37. recently received 
a superior service award from the Secre- 
tary of Health. Education and Welfare 
Abraham Ribocoff for "effective leader- 
ship in the conduct of certification serv- 
ices with respect to safety and efficacy of 
important antibiotic drugs throughout a 
difficult period.'' 

Dr. Cirove joined the Baltimore 
Laboratories of the Food and Drug Ad- 
ministration in 1932, and was trans- 
ferred to the Washington Laboratories 
in 1937. After working in various de- 
partments he was transferred in 1945 to 
help form the Division of Antibiotics. 
He has been Acting Director of the 
Division of Antibiotics since May I960. 

Dr. William M. Heller, Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital Pharmacy Intern 1949-51, 
M.S. in Pharmacy 1951, Ph.D. with 
major in pharmacy 1955, has been 
named Editor of a new column, "As 
a Hospital Pharmacist Sees It," ap- 
pearing in Drug Topics, pharmaceutical 
trade publication. Dr. Heller is cur- 
rently Chief of the Pharmacy Service 
at the University of Arkansas Medical 
Center, and Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacology at the School of Medi- 
cine, University of Arkansas. 

Dr. Leonard Karel who earned the 
Ph.D. in 1941 with a major in phar- 
macology has been appointed special 
assistant to the associate director of re- 
(Continued on next page) 



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November-December, 1961 



25 




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Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

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6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

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search of the National Science Foun- 
dation. Dr. Karel came to the Foun- 
dation from the National Institutes of 
Health where he headed a branch of the 
Allergy and Infectious Diseases Insti- 
tute and directed programs of research 
in bacteriology, virology, tropical medi- 
cine and parasitology and related sub- 
jects. 

Lt. Clarence L. Anstine, U.S.N. R., 
B.S. '58, is instructor in Naval Intelli- 
gence at the Fleet Air Intelligence 
Training Center in Norfolk, Virginia. 

Graduate Student Wins National 

Research Award 
Mr. Arvind P. Shroff, who is presently 
working for his Doctor of Philosophy 
degree with a major in pharmaceutical 
chemistry at the University of Mary- 
land School of Pharmacy, earned an 
Honorable Mention Award in the 
graduate competition of the Southern 
Region in the Lunsford Richardson 
Pharmacy Awards. In addition to re- 
ceiving a certificate, he is granted a 
$100.00 honorarium. At the same time, 
an honorarium of $10.00 will be pre- 
sented to the University of Maryland 
School of Pharmacy, Student Branch of 
the American Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion, since Mr. Shroff is a member of 
that branch. 

The objective of these awards is to 
encourage scientific and professional 
thinking on the part of students, both 
graduate and undergraduate, in the in- 
terest of furthering pharmacy as a 
cardinal member of the American health 
team. 

Mr. Shroff had submitted a paper 
on the steroid research which he had 
completed with Dr. Norman J. Dooren- 
bos, Associate Professor of Pharma- 
ceutical Chemistry. 

Dr. Ernst Klesper Joins Faculty 
Dr. Ernst Klesper has joined the faculty 
of the School of Pharmacy this Septem- 
ber as Assistant Professor of Physical 
Chemistry in the Department of Phar- 
maceutical Chemistry. Dr. Klesper was 
enrolled from 1947-49 at the University 
of Kiel and from 1949 to 1954 at the 
University of Hamburg in Germany, 
completing his formal education in 1954 
with a Dr. rer. nat. His thesis work 
was concerned with inorganic fluorine 
compounds. From 1955-1958 Dr. 
Klesper was Chief Chemist of Wm. T. 
Burnett and Co., Inc., in Baltimore. 
From 1958-1961, Dr. Ernst Klesper 
was a research associate at the Johns 
Hopkins University conducting re- 
search on the analytical and synthetic 
aspects of porphyrins. He was espe- 
cially interested in porphyrins found in 
petroleum since they might elucidate 
the origin of petroleum. Porphyrins are 
degradation products of chlorophyll. Dr. 
Klesper is the author of several research 
papers including such subjects as 
chromatography of organic compounds; 
effect of structure on reaction kinetics; 



26 



the Maryland Magazine 



high pressure gas chromatography above 
critical temperatures; and identification 
of porphyrin by the x-ray powder 
method. Dr. Klesper will teach under- 
graduate courses in Physical Chemistrj 
and conduct research on the physical 
chemical aspects of drugs. 

School of Pharmacy Re( i ives 
Research Grants 
The National Institutes of Health 
awarded two research grants for a total 
of $124,000 to the School of Pharmacy 
for research that is to be conducted 
over a three-year period. The National 
Institute of Mental Health awarded a 
$45,000 grant for the synthesis of com- 
pounds of possible usefulness in the 
treatment and study of mental illness 
and for a basic chemical investigation 
of the properties and reactions of these 
compounds. This research is being done 
under the direction of Dr. Francis M. 
Miller, Professor of Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry, with the assistance of Bar- 
bara Konopik, Irving Fried, Theodore 
Wang, Albert Warfield and David 
Warthen, who are graduate students 
within the department. 

The National Cancer Institute 
awarded a $79,000 grant to support 
steroid research directed toward the 
synthesis and study of steroid alkaloids 
which might be useful in the treatment 
of cancer and heart disease. This re- 
search has been in progress for three 
years under the direction of Dr. Norman 
J. Doorenbos, Associate Professor of 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry. He is being 
assisted by Dr. Mu Tsu Wu, Dr. Leon 
Milewich, Mr. Charles Kumkumian, 
Mr. Robert Havranek, Mr. Arvin Shroff, 
Mr. Conrad Dorn, Mr. V. C. Patel and 
Miss Masako Nakagawa, who are post 
doctoral fellows or graduate students 
in the department of Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry. 

Smith, Kline and French Laboratories 
has again renewed its research grant of 
$7500 to support a portion of the 
steroids research program for this school 
year. This is the third year that Smith, 
Kline and French has supported this 
program. 



School of 

SOCIAL WORK 

Appointed Assistant Professor 

Joseph F. Toll, for the past four years 
Psychiatric Social Service Administra- 
tor of Evansville State Hospital, Evans- 
ville, Indiana, has been appointed As- 
sistant Professor of Social Work in the 
University's newly established School 
of Social Work, where he will serve as 
field instructor for a student unit at 
the Baltimore City Department of Pub- 
lic Welfare. 

(Continued on next page) 







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November-December, 1961 



27 



IN the MARYLAND SEGMENT 

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Phone: FEderal 7-7038 

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Room Phones GRanite 4-6565 



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The appointment was made possible 
by a grant from Community Research 
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Before going to Evansville Prof. Toll 
directed social service at Woodville 
State Hospital, in Woodville, Pennsyl- 
vania; in all, his experience in the field 
of psychiatric social work spans nearly 
twenty years. He is a graduate of the 
College of the City of New York, did 
graduate work in clinical psychology 
at Ohio State University, and earned a 
Master of Social Work degree at the 
University of Pennsylvania School of 
Social Work. 

At Evansville he received a $79,000 
grant from the National Institute of 
Mental Health to demonstrate the value 
of a home-maker service program in 
state hospital treatment of mental pa- 
tients. 

Several professional journals have 
published articles by Prof. Toll. He is 
a member of the National Association 
of Social Work and the National Coun- 
cil on Crime and Delinquency. 

First Class Held 

The University's School of Social Work 
held its first class, September 25, with 
30 students chosen from more than 100 
applicants. This enrollment exceeds by 
50 per cent the estimate given the 
University's Board of Regents last year. 

Classrooms and offices for the new 
school, on a newly renovated floor of 
Redwood Hall, at 721 West Redwood 
Street, were completed just in time for 
the opening class. 

Dr. Verl S. Lewis, Dean of the 
School, announced that a supplemen- 
tary grant of $8,000 from the Com- 
munity Research Associates, Inc., a 
nonprofit research group of New York 
City, will permit the establishment of 
a student unit in the Baltimore City 
Welfare Department, where six students 
will be assigned for two days' field 
instruction a week to help welfare re- 
cipients solve personal problems. 

Besides Dean Lewis, the staff of 
the new school includes two Associate 
Professors, Manon McGinnis and Irma 
L. Stein, and an Assistant Professor, 
Joseph F. Toll. 

Miss Simpson Awarded Scholarship 
The University's School of Social Work 
has awarded a full-tuition scholarship 
provided by the Maryland chapter of 
the National Association of Social 
Workers to Mary Jane Simpson, Balti- 
more. 

A native of Hagerstown, Miss Simp- 
son is a graduate of Duke University 
and holds an M.A. degree in American 
Civilization from the University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Miss Simpson is one of 30 students 
enrolled for the inaugural year of the 
University of Maryland's newest pro- 
fessional school. This is a two-year 
program leading to a Master of Social 
Work degree. 



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28 



the Maryland Magazine 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 



Appointment of New Directors 

New directors have been appointed to 
both the European and Far East Di- 
visions of the University of Maryland's 
University College. 

Dr. Mason G. Daly is the new Chief 
in Europe. He has been succeeded as 
Director of the Far East Division by 
Dr. Leslie R. Bundgaard, his former 
second-in-command. 

The reassignments, two of many ad- 
ministrative changes necessitated at this 
time, stemmed from the death last No- 
vember of Brig. Gen. Herman Beukema 
(U.S. Army, retired), European Di- 
vision Director. 

Dr. Daly is no newcomer to the 
European Division. He joined the 
Maryland faculty as a speech instructor 
in 1951, the year after receiving his 
doctorate from Northwestern Univer- 
sity. He became an Assistant Director 
of the University London office the next 
year, and in 1954 was assigned to the 
Heidelberg headquarters of the Di- 
vision as Associate Director serving 
under Gen. Beukema. 

He took over as Director of the Far 
East Division in 1957, a year after 
Maryland began its operations in that 
area. 

Dr. Bundgaard joined the University 
of Maryland staff in 1954 as an in- 
structor in Government and Politics on 
the College Park campus. Two years 
later, after receiving the Men's League 
Award as outstanding faculty member 
for 1956, he was transferred to the 
European Division in the capacity of 
Assistant Professor in the Department. 

He was dispatched to the Far East 
Division one year later as Assistant 
Director, and in 1958 was named As- 
sociate Director under Dr. Daly, the 
position he has held until his newest 
promotion. 

Personal Notes 
Army Capt. Alvin L. Meredith, '59, re- 
cently arrived in Germany and is as- 
signed to 79th Artillery where he is 
commander of the Artillery's Head- 
quarters and Service Battery in Giessen. 

Louis E. Tagliaferris, '61, has joined 
the personnel department at Monsanto 
Chemical Company's John F. Queeny 
Plant, St. Louis, Missouri. 

L. Lawrence Dixon, '60, appointed 
Vice President — sales for Electronic 
Aids, Inc., in which he will direct all 
national and international sales and 
marketing programs for the company. 

John J. Williams, '59, has returned to 
the United States on home leave from 
the U.S. International Cooperation Ad- 
ministration mission in Korea. Mr. 
Williams' next assignment is in Moga- 
discio, Samali, where he will be Supply 
Advisor. 

(Continued on next page) 



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MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Phi Kappa Phi Initiation 

Five University College students were 
recently inducted into the Phi Kappa 
Phi, scholastic honor society. They were 
among the group in the 49th annual 
initiation ceremonies held at the Uni- 
versity this summer. 

The students are: Captain Gilbert 
Stockman, U. S. Army; Major Siegfried 
M. Clemens, U. S. Army; Miss Ellen de 
Beruff, civilian; Mr. Douglas A. Ne- 
mier, civilian; Lieutenant Charles J. 
Williams, U. S. Air Force. 

Founded in 1897 at the University 
of Maine, Phi Kappa Phi is now a na- 
tional organization with over 75 chap- 
ters. The Society has for its sole pur- 
pose the recognition and encouragement 
of superior scholarship. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 

Dr. August Kiel 

Dr. August Kiel, '46, a neurosurgeon, 
member of staff of University's Medical 
School and a member of the staffs of 
four Baltimore hospitals. He was 39. 

He served in the Navy for two years 
during World War II. 

Following graduation from medical 
school, Dr. Kiel served his internship 
at Mercy and University Hospitals. 

At the time of death he was a staff 
surgeon at those two hospitals as well 
as St. loseph's Hospital and Bon Se- 
cours Hospital. 

In addition to his parents, he is sur- 
vived by his wife and four sons. 

Edwin G. W. Ruge 

Edwin G. W. Ruge, former Professor 
at the University's Law School. 

Mr. Ruge taught agency, contracts 
and corporation law. He came to the 
University in 1925 and retired in 1958. 

He was graduated from Yale Univer- 
sity in 1912 and from the Harvard Law 
School in 1915. After practicing law in 
Atlanta, Georgia, for two years, he 
served in the army in World War I, 
holding the rank of captain in the 36th 
Infantry Regiment. 

He was awarded the Distinguished 
Service Cross and the Order of the 
Purple Heart for extraordinary heroism 
in action in the Meuse Argonne. 

After the War, Mr. Ruge worked in 
Cleveland, and then practiced law in 
New York, before coming to the Uni- 
versity. 

When he retired James P. Wharton, 
Professor of Fine Arts, painted his 
portrait, which was presented to the 
dean of the Law School. 



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30 



the Maryland Magazine 



Henry H. O'Neii i 

Henry Hugh O'Neill, Agr. '12, retired 
Justice of the Peace and former sub- 
stitute trial magistrate at Hyattsville 
Police Court. Mr. O'Neill was 70. 

Mr. O'Neill was a member of the 
American Legion and a past member 
of the Veterans of Foreign Wars and 
Lions International. 



Joseph Lockk Mason 

Joseph Locke Mason, Agr. '36, a stock- 
broker with the Silver Spring firm of 
Rouse, Brewer, Becker & Bryant. He 

was 43. 



Donald W. Meadows 

Donald W. Meadows, BPA '52, former 
resident of the District, died in a crash 
of a private airplane in Brazil. 

Mr. Meadows was employed by the 
Corn Product Company as an auditor 
for their international division. He had 
been in Brazil for over 5 years. 

He leaves his mother, Mrs. Mary S. 
Meadows, and two brothers. 



Thomas H. Bartilson 

Dr. Thomas H. Bartilson, Ph.D. '50, 
Assistant Director of Animal Husbandry 
Research for the Agriculture Depart- 
ment, died after a long illness. 

In 1923 and 1924 he taught poultry 
husbandry at the University, prior to 
joining the Agriculture Department in 
1929. 

He was a member of Phi Kappa Phi, 
Alpha Zeta and Pi Sigma Alpha, all 
honorary agricultural societies; the 
American Society of Animal Husbandry 
for the Advancement of Science. He 
was also a 32d-degree Mason, a Shriner 
and a member of Mount Hermon 
Masonic Lodge, Hyattsville, Maryland. 

Michael A. Pennella 

Capt. Michael A. Pennella, A & S '43, 
a retired Army officer who was born in 
the District and served with distinction 
in the Italian campaign of World War 
II. He was 40. 

Capt. Pennella earned his commis- 
sion while attending Reserve Officers 
Training Corps programs at the Univer- 
sity, and entered the Army at the be- 
ginning of World War II. 

As a Ranger, he saw action at Anzio 
and Salerno, was twice wounded, and 
was awarded several decorations. After 
the war, he served in the South Pacific 
until he was taken ill about six years 
ago. He retired because of medical 
disability. 

He then joined his wife, in Chapel 
Hill, North Carolina, and was employed 
at the University of North Carolina. 
Mrs. Pennella died a year ago. 

(Continued on next page) 



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November-December, 1961 



31 



Other Deaths 

Mrs. William H. Spalding. Nurs. '10, 

of Baltimore. Maryland. 
Fred Shapiro. DDS '28, of West Hart- 
ford. Connecticut. 

Walton L. Strother. M.D. '00, of 
Clarksburg, West Virginia. 

Louie M. Limbaugh, M.D. '14, of 

Jacksonville. Florida. 
Marion Y. Keith, M.D. '23. of Greens- 
boro. North Carolina. 

Edward A. Lynaugh, DDS '15, of Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island. 

F. Eugene Polance, DDS '19, of Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Luther A. Riser, M.D. '08, of Columbia, 
South Carolina. 

Robert J. King, DDS '27, of Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Maurice Rome Brown, LLB '31, of 
San Francisco, California. 

Mrs. Stow, Nurs. '94, of Frederick, 
Maryland. 

Robert Dixon Smith, A&S '58, of 
Phoenix, Maryland. 

Russel B. Strite, Eng'r '26, of White- 
boro, New York. 

George Lewis Pence, M.D., of Hinton, 
West Virginia. 

Edd A. Misenheimer, M.D., of Concord, 
North Carolina. 

James F. Condron, M.D. '48, of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

H. Stanley Ford, Eng'r '14, of Birming- 
ham, Michigan. 

John Kenneth Wilson, Agr. '26, of 
Pylesville, Maryland. 

Walter K. Hartsell, DDS '01, of Greens- 
boro, North Carolina. 

Franklin B. Weller, DDS '97, of Rock 
Stream, New York. 

Laurence L. Leggett, DDS '30, of Mt. 
Airy. Maryland. 

Dr. Jose Davila Lopez, M.D. '42, of 
Puerto Rico. 

Oregon Milton Dennis, LLB '91, of 
Tomkins Cove, New York. 

Sherman J. Hamilton, DDS, of Freder- 
ick, Maryland. 

O. F. Hershey, LLB '92, of Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

J. J. O'Connor, M.D. '07, of Olyphant, 
Pennsylvania. 

Robert W. Beckham, Eng'r '37, of 
Murrysville, Pennsylvania. 

Sydney T. Lawler 

Sydney T. Lawler, Agr. '31, a well 
known teacher in Montgomery County. 
Mr. Lawler had been a science 
teacher at Sherwood High School in 
Sandy Spring since 1935. He served 
as school principal from 1943 to 1948. 
He organized the first vocational agri- 
culture class at the school. 



Dr. Thomas C. Wilder 

Dr. Thomas C. Wilder, M.D. '41, a 
member of the surgical staff of the 
Rockwood Clinic, Spokane, Washing- 
ton, died on October 16, 1961. 



Dr. Wilder was born in Chicago, 
Illinois, on July 19, 1915, the son of 
Dr. & Mrs. Russell Morse Wilder. He 
came to Rochester when his father was 
appointed to the staff of the Mayo 
Clinic in 1919, and he attended the 
public schools of Rochester. 

He was an intern in the University 
of Maryland Hospitals in Baltimore in 
1941 and 1942. 

Dr. Wilder returned to Rochester in 
1942, as a fellow in surgery of the 
Mayo Foundation, but left in 1943, on 
active duty in the Medical Corps of 
the U.S. Naval Reserve. He was re- 
leased to civil life in 1946. 

Dr. Wilder then resumed his fellow- 
ship in surgery in the Mayo Founda- 
tion. He was appointed a first assistant 
in surgery in 1948 and he was an as- 
sistant to the surgical staff of the Mayo 
Clinic in 1948 and 1949. He received 
the degree of master of science in sur- 
gery from the University of Minnesota 
in 1949. He left Rochester in 1949, 
to enter the private practice of surgery, 
and became associated with the Rock- 
wood Clinic in Spokane, Washington. 
He was a member of the staff of the 
Deaconess Hospital and the Sacred 
Heart Hospital, and was extended cour- 
tesy privileges by the staff of Saint 
Luke's Hospital, all of Spokane. 

Dr. Wilder was certified as a spe- 
cialist in surgery in 1950 by the Ameri- 
can Board of Surgery, Inc. He was a 
member of the American Medical As- 
sociation, the Washington State Medi- 
cal Association, the Nu Sigma Nu pro- 
fessional medical fraternity and the 
Alumni Association of the Mayo Foun- 
dation. 

Sterling Ely 

Sterling Ely, A & S '21, Washington 
representative for the Union Carbide 
Corp. He was 62. 

Mr. Ely was a native of Nelsonville, 
New Jersey, but had lived in Washing- 
ton since his graduation from the Uni- 
versity. He was a research chemist and 
a consultant to chemical firms including 
the National Carbon Company, Haynes 
Stellite Company, and affiliates, in the 
early days of his career. 

He received a law degree in 1930, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1931. 
He was identified thereafter with legal 
aspects of the chemical business. He 
had been with Union Carbide since 
1944. 

Mr. Ely was a past President of the 
University Club and a member of the 
Nineteen Twenty-five F Street Club and 
the Beachcombers Club at Province- 
town, Massachusetts, where he had a 
summer home. 

He was a member of the American 
Chemical Society, American Bar Asso- 
ciation, American Judicature Society, 
and Delta Sigma Phi. 

Survivors include his wife and two 
children. 



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Acme Iron Works 21 

Alcazar 27 

American Disinfectant Co. 30 

American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

Inside Front Cover 

Anchor Post Products Co.. Inc 28 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co.. Inc 24 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn 26 

Asphalt Service Co.. Inc 20 

Atchison & Keller, Inc 22 

Avignone Freres 30 

Baltimore Envelope Co. . . 27 

Baltimore Photo & Blue Print Co 21 

Bard- Avon School 28 

Herrmann's Laundry 27 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc 30 

Bon Ton Food Products 28 

Brentwood Inn 20 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 26 

Briggs & Company, Meat Products 30 

Thomas E. Carroll & Son 24 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 27 

Crosse & Blackwell 17 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 30 

D. C. Ignition Headquarters, Inc. 28 

Del Haven White House Motel 28 

Embassy Dairy 18 

Farmers Cooperative Assn. 28 

J. H. Filbert Co 24 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn 25 

John G. Fitzgerald, Plumbing and Heating . . 19 

Franklin Uniform Co 26 

Fuller & d'Albert, Inc 28 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co 22 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 26 



Harvey Dairy 

Hotel Harrington 

The House of Sound . ... 

1 luffer-Shinn Optical Co.. Inc. 

The In Town Motor Hotels 

Johnston, Lemon & Co. 



Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc. . . 
E. H. Koester Bakery Co. 



LtlStine Chevrolet 



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Maryland Hotel Supply Co 24 

Massey-Furguson, Inc 26 

Midwest Book Center 19 

Modern Machinists Co 23 

Murray-Baumgartner Co 



McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc. 



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Norman Motor Co 23 

North Washington Press. Inc. 23 

Northrop Inside Back Cover 

Occidental Restaurant 21 

Oles Envelope Corp ... 27 

Ottenberg's Bakers, Inc. 31 

Palmer Ford, Inc 29 

Park Transfer Co 31 

Poor, Bowen, Bartlett & Kennedy, Inc. 18 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co., Inc 

Sealtest Foods 23 

Seidenspinner Realtor 23 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 

Russell W. Smith, Insurance 26 

Strayer College 

Student's Supply Store 30 

Suburban Trust Co ... 28 

Sweetheart Bread 21 



Thomsson Steel Co.. Inc. 
Town Hall Tavern 



Vermont Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 

Wallop & Son, Insurance . . 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange, Inc. 

Westiughnuse Electric Corp. 

Perry 0. Wilkinson. Insurance 

Williams Construction Co., Inc. 

J. McKenuy Willis & Son. Inc 



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York Building Products Co., Inc. 19 

York Wholesalers. Inc. 25 



Duke Zeibert's Restaurant 



24 



32 



the Maryland Magazine 



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seAsoirs QReecioQS 



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bCHOV 



V.W 



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TO ALUMNI EVERYWHERE, 

A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS AND 

A NEW YEAR BLESSED 

WITH PEACE AND UNDERSTANDING